Making welding tables

A couple months ago, I discovered that "welding tables", meaning sturdy tables with thick steel tops 3/8 to 1 inch, are very hot
selling items, desired by many people and easy to sell.
Right now I have several steel plates of such thicknesses and a quantity of 2 inch pipe.
I plan on making tables by just cutting off 30" or so pieces of said pipe and welding them as table legs to the plates.
My questions are
1) do they need any reinforcements, such as cross braces etc 2) What is the most optimal table height? 30 inches?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ig, 2" pipe is very strong in compression, but pretty narrow. Given its column strength, someone might be encouraged to put a VERY heavy item on the table, then attempt to move it, bending or breaking off the tiny legs.
You should gusset them or diagonally brace them. I'd also put at least one leg dead in the middle, to prevent bowing with heavy, centered loads.
I personally prefer about 32" high, but that's a highly "personalized" matter, and partly hinges on what sort of work will be done on the table. For tiny work, 36" might be better.
If it's not too much work, you could put footed telescoping rods into the bottoms of the tubular legs, and drill a few holes for cross-bolts.
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2012-12-01, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Lloyd, I read your post and at first I agreed with you. But as I kept driving, I realized that I disagree more than I agree.
2" pipe at 30 inches is very sturdy. If you load the table to the extent that dragging it can collapse the pipe, it would be so heavy that dragging it would not be practical.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 01 Dec 2012 11:29:32 -0600, Ignoramus7601

Dragging a table? Whatever for?
And 2" pipe wont hold a vise very damned well either.
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nah... attempting to drag the load across the table.
Yeah... 2" won't hold a vise OR a grinder very well. It vibrates like a bowstring under any rotating load.
Ig, I suspect you do not appreciate how small and "fragile" 2" pipe is compared to the loads routinely put on AND DRAGGED ACROSS welding tables.
I didn't suggest that someone might just put a hand on one end of the work and pull. But he/she might attempt to drag it with mechanical means, or with a couple of helpers. People don't think before they jump.
LLoyd
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm thinking make 4 side pipes - using the 'ends' at one height and that ties two legs from spreading and then two more t's at a different height for the other legs. Now all four are attached to themselves and to the top.
I'd consider having pipe flanges on the feet - allowing for locking to the floor but also screw up/down to level just right on all four legs.
Martin
On 12/1/2012 11:29 AM, Ignoramus7601 wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A couple months ago, I discovered that "welding tables", meaning sturdy tables with thick steel tops 3/8 to 1 inch, are very hot selling items, desired by many people and easy to sell.
Right now I have several steel plates of such thicknesses and a quantity of 2 inch pipe.
I plan on making tables by just cutting off 30" or so pieces of said pipe and welding them as table legs to the plates.
My questions are
1) do they need any reinforcements, such as cross braces etc 2) What is the most optimal table height? 30 inches?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, for sale, 43x49 welding table, 3/8 inches top, brand new, never used, made in USA.
Picture here:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-eiT08-xZ7nQ/ULo71Z9xrCI/AAAAAAAABwk/W6pJmjwn1ok/s720/20121201_111700.jpg
Price $200, I will ask for more elsewhere.
i

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 01 Dec 2012 11:30:41 -0600, Ignoramus7601

Nice table. But..it needs a shelf underneath on at least..one narrow side. Clamps, hammers etc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Reinforce them, even with triangles of plate. Make clamp hangers, grinder hangers, and a little shelf for square, soapstone, ruler, etc. Make them strong, and build for disaster, because those things happen. Even if it bends somewhat, then you have an untrue welding surface, which would have been so easy to have prevented.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/2/2012 6:08 PM, Steve B wrote:

I'd want all those things, and most of what others have said regarding convenience features. But ... these tables will be bought by _weldors_ - let them add the features that they'd like and want. I'd say that Iggy can maximize his value-added per hour-spent by doing what he is doing: the minimum.
My $.02, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good point. Here's a welding table. You are a weldor, so make it into your perfect welding table with hangers, doodads, a polished shelf for condoms etc.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Steve, I may add some reinforcement, I have some steel round bars 1/2 and 5/8 inch, which are not really usable for anything, but they would be used to tie the legs together near the floor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Just remember your weakest area is going to be where it can be side loaded or pressure applied from the side.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/1/2012 8:18 AM, Ignoramus7601 wrote:

Mine is 42" high. I do a lot of small stuff and it is a good height to work at standing or sitting on a tall stool. The height has been good for me. I have 2" x 1/4" angle at the bottom of the legs and 4" wheels under that. The wheels are fantastic in every shop I have had it in (5 since I built it 20 years ago). I have a column of 36" x 3" PVC tubes below the top, running front to back to store rod in. The top is 3/8" plate with the corners radiused at about 6" so it does not do a kidneyectomy on you if you back into it or cut the corner walking around it.
BobH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That makes a whole two people here who understand the folly of a 30" height for a welding table..... goodgawd.... Sheeit, kitchen counters/stove tops are 36" in height! Heh, mebbe Iggy is only 4' 8"??
Angle iron for legs is also a big help, can still weld pipe at the bottom for adjustability. 2" pipe for the whole leg is way too dorky.
--
EA



I have 2" x 1/4" angle at the bottom of the legs and 4" wheels
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/2/2012 8:09 PM, Existential Angst wrote:

It probably makes some difference what kind of welding you are doing for how high you want the table. Pretty much all my welding is TIG welding. For me, I like to put my arm and hand down flat on the table for stability. For stick or MIG welding, the weld is happening a foot lower than your hand, so a lower table might be good.
The wheels are important to me because I can move the table around to deal with different jobs in the shop.
BobH
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BobH wrote:

Why I like my hydraulic table. Just adjust it so you're comfortable.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or make a 48" table, and supply a milk crate as an accessory.... lol
--
EA


>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve W. wrote:

Reminds of what I use as a coffee table/ small dining table. It is a very sculpted old barber chair base or similar and I have a 30mm thick marble top a bit over a metre in diameter on it. It will raise from about 17" to 26" and spin round and can be locked. I would expect it to make a nice welding table with a steel top and an extension to raise it a bit. I know a couple of antiques restorers that have similar bases to allow the pieces they're working on to be raised to a convenient height.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.