My mig died today

My old Dan-mig mig welder died on me today in mid bead. Nothing
lights up, but the fuses are ok. I ll try to trouble shoot it. Not
even a pilot light.
Sigh..damnit.
Shit.
Sob.
Gunner
It's better to be a red person in a blue state
than a blue person in a red state. As a red
person, if your blue neighbors turn into a mob
at least you have a gun to protect yourself.
As a blue person, your only hope is to appease
the red mob with herbal tea and marinated tofu.
(Phil Garding)
Reply to
Gunner
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You going to give the old girl a proper burial? She has done you well hasn't she? that is the least you can do for her... :)
Reply to
Don D.
That's rotten luck Gunner. Sorry to hear it.
I'm not familier with Dan-Mig products, but I would almost bet it has a control transformer that supplies power to the contactor, wire feed system and indicator light. If I recall correctly, some of the old Lincolon machines I have worked on had an internal fuse to protect this control circuit. Dan-Mig may have done the same.
Good Luck,
Bob
Reply to
Bob
Big sigh of relief.. I found one of the control transformer wires on the secondary side dangling free. So I put it back in place (really tight in there) and tightened up every screw I could find.
Its working fine again...yay!
Thanks all.
Gunner
" We have all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare...Thanks to AOL and WebTv, we know this is not possible."
Reply to
Gunner
I'm glad you were able to revive the old machine with that little bit of minor surgery. Well done!
Bob
Reply to
Bob
Just a note for y'all with transformer type MIG's and TIGS. If it's not a loose wire but the transformer that appears to be shot, not all is lost. Start unwrapping the wire on the bad coil until you find the break (usually in the first 50 turns) and reterminate the wire to the connection lug. (Solder or mechanical connection.) Don't bother to resolder the wire together on the transformer, it will almost immediately fail due to the increase in resistance at the joint.
I have done this on a Snap-On MIG (God know's who actually makes it.) and it's a tip I picked up from working on coils on pinball and electromechanical arcade games. I have yet to find a coil I couldn't pull less than 50 turns off of and resolder the connection. Actually makes the coil pull a bit stronger in the deal as well.
Just my 2 cents on this thread.
Bart
Reply to
Bart D. Hull
Yeah, I was a game technician right out of tech school. I learned more about electronics at that job than I did in two years and $20-something grand at ITT. Pinball machines were my favorite to troubleshoot. Mostly Williams and Gottlieb machines. Never tried unwinding coils, though. Owners were pricks. I hear they got busted by the IRS recently.
The toughest lesson I learned was not to handle playfield glass without warming your hands up first (in the winter). 250 miles round trip to get glass on a friday afternoon sucks.
Reply to
John L. Weatherly
Either Century or Sytematic.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

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