Welding table

What would be the disadvantages of making a welding table out of 1/4 inch aluminium plate? I have been experimenting with a piece of scrap
ally of this thickness and haven't come across any problems as yet. The reason I ask? I have found a pneumatically operated drafting table that I would like to convert into a welding table for doing those litttle TIG jobs that require a steady hand and good positioning. However I think a steel plate would be too heavy for it. My deal table area would be 4ft by 3ft. Any comments welcome.
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wrote:

I've never tried an aluminum top. But here's something I found useful on a welding table - a smaller table on one end that can be adjusted for height. Mine is 2 pieces of about 5X5x3/8X24" angle back to back. Sits about 6" above the table normally, but can be raised another foot. Reduces stooping. Strong enough to hammer on, easy to clamp from either side or both with visegrips, C clamps, etc. Has one angle closed in on one end for clamping small pieces at 90 degrees. I find I use that smaller table a whole lot, and the main table ends up being where all the tools are piled. :-)
Wayne
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We use .120" aluminum tops on a couple of student use welding booth tables. On the positive side, the tables hold up well, the weld spatter just brushes off. On the downside, one of the tops has a hole in it where a student laid a big MIG bead in the wrong spot. I think 1/4" or 3/8" aluminum top for a portable table would be ok.
Howard Hughes wrote:

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