Welding videos

Mostly selling equipment but still interesting. http://www.weldingtheater.com/Video-News /

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Steve



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It would be nice if they were on dvd. I haven't owned a vcr for years. Bob

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Sailor wrote:

I actually bought two videos recently because I have a small TV/VCR combo that I keep around, but I asked Steve at www.weldingvideos.com if they had plans to offer the videos in DVD format.
He said they were and they should be available sometime around September.
rvb
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Someone posted a couple of useful URLs a few days back. I think one of them my have been http://www.weekendwelder.com or something like that. Seems they had a few "movies" there that could be viewed online. If you have broadband it might be better, but I watched a couple with a 56k connection. It just took a while to buffer the movie.
Al
==========Rick Barter wrote:

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Yes, these look to be the same videos.
I am very pleased with them. I just finished the first Arc welding videa and getting ready to start the second. Very good quality footage.
Jim
0225024&categoryId=0

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I bought 4 of them from Northern Tool. Yes they are the Wall Mountain videos. I have Oxy-Act. Welding, Arc I and II, and GMAW Wire Feed. Seems to be a good basis for starting out and answers a lot of questions that I wasn't smart enough to think of just starting out.
Mike
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There are a few interesting ones in there, like the Oxylance video.
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wrote:

That was awesome. I only saw one burning bar in use in my life. The underwater hollow cutting rods we used remind me of a mini burning bar. I was surprised that they used dewers of oxygen to feed them. I know those suits are good, but it has to get fairly warm in there. Know any links to the electric underwater cutting rods? We learned about them first topside cutting railroad rails, then went into the tank. They cut sweet, but you have to be careful, especially if you're clearing a prop.
Steve
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    --For a good time check out the first few minutes of a movie called "Thief" wherein our hero uses a burning bar to pop a safe. Very kewl.
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Do us a favor and rescue
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : a doggie or three...
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It looks good on the movies, but I think it would fry almost anything inside. Mythbusters filled a safe with water, then blew it up. It was their best way of popping a safe without destroying the contents.
Steve
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Actually I use that scene from "Thief" with my welding students. It is one of the best scenes ever filmed of steel burning.
I admit they would have been low on breathing air by the time they got through the door, but the actual burning bar is very real. I would love to know who was the consultant on that.
BTW In the movie they were after diamonds so the heat didn't matter.
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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

Considering the possible heat involved and oxygen and the value of the content they may have wanted to avoid direct impingement on the diamonds, I've not seen the film AFAIK. The subject of diamond burning came up awhile ago on rcm and while not easy a jeweller chipped in that it is possible to damage diamond with excessive heating. My memory of an OpenUniversity program about activation energy and burning diamond was an example. It discussed the differing ease of burning various forms of carbon, and diamond while not easy, will burn. Here is an OU film on youtube, not the same one I recall, but it does show burning diamond.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mKqtT8J2ms

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Damn, reminds me of Marathon Man where at the end all the diamonds go into the water.
Geez.
Steve
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diamonds burn very nicely in hot air or oxygen.
I am downloading this movie right now.
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wrote:

Marathon Man or the movie about the burning bar? If you watch Marathon Man, you will never look at your dentist the same way again.
Steve
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I am downloading "Thief".
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to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
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as it happens, on cable currently they are running the movie "killer pad" which has the distinction of being directed by robert englund, who played freddy kreuger in the nightmare on elm street series. it's quite possibly the worst movie i've ever seen, and i make it a point to find bad movies; but anyway, in one scene, a guy is torturing another guy and you see him working hard to yank something from the victim's head while the victim is screaming; then he turns around and it's a nose hair. (did i mention it was a comedy-horror movie?)
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Go to the Oxylance site and they also have videos of the smaller system. The industry standard for the commercial diving industry is Broco, but a bunch of smaller companies make small hand held Exothermic lance systems.
Broco http://www.strongweldingproducts.com/broco/index.cfm
Oxylance http://www.oxylance.com /
Scorpion http://www.specialwelds.com/products/scorpion/index.htm
Netherlance http://www.netherlance.com /
Colemetal http://www.colemetal.co.uk/main.htm
Magnum USA Blackhawk http://blackhawktorch.com /
Arcair Slice Torch http://www.thermadyne.com/IM_Uploads/DocLib_733_69_64-2103.pdf
We use the MagnumUSA Blackhawk torches at school, and I have a Arcair Slice torch myself.
We burn through about $3000 of Blackhawk rod every month at school.
There are various methods of making Exothermic Cutting Rods. Some are steel tubes coated in Ceramic, some look like a jellyroll in cross section, but most are just a steel tube filled with steel wires wrapped in electrical tape. How they charge as much as they do baffles me. The Blackhawk rod costs about 30% less than Broco rod and as far as I can tell the only difference is that I think Broco has a really cool machine for applying the electrical tape and Blackhawk uses a room full of 12 year old Phillipino girls.
I have made rods for my Slice torch by just filling steel hydraulic tube with TIG welding filler rods. They worked great, and cost less than the real thing.
You can use a welding power source to add an electric arc to the blast if you are cutting metals, and it does make it more aggressive, but for non-conductive materials you can just use a 12 volt battery to ignite the end of the rod and then just use the blast to cut.
A lot of fire departments use them for emergency extraction.
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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

I thought one of those six wire inside the tube was magnesium, not steel. I seem to recall reading that in the Navy U/W welding / cutting manual you gave me the link for. I think when I was looking at the Broco rods one of the wires had red paint on the end in each rod as well.
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I saw an oxylance cut through a gear that was the size of my truck. It was a massive unit - likely out of balance beyond fix or other - The scrap yard got it free from the foundry/gear plant and they cut it in quarters, photograph it for proof, then sell - yes sell it back to the foundry - smaller chunks fit in easier.... :-) They got a great deal and have been serving the foundry at the foundry will - thus the nice deal.
The gear would be lanced and it was something to see from a distance! We are talking about thick metal. Once two cuts are made it was dropped from 40' or so and most of the time the slag would snap off and a quarter falls away.
Remember many safes have a thick concrete or stone interior. That keeps out some metal cutting. Jack hammer is also needed...
Martin
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

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