What do you want in a welding book?

I think it would be more helpful to have a more advanced book based mainly on TIG. There are plenty of books on general welding. The only
good TIG book I have seen is Millers.
I would include pics and descriptions on back purging SS and Ti. Proper preheats and slow cool times for cast iron and aluminum, and why you would use 99ni and 4047 over say 55ni or 4043. Why you would use a 304L, 304LSi or 304H rod for specific SS applications. I would also focus on the pros and cons of using an inverter or transformer machine. I would have a section on Chromoly also. Also incude info on different gas blends and the results. Using tips and tricks that you have learned along the way. Basic torch and consumable selection. (I use mainly a 75% Helium mix on my Dynasty 300.) Later on you could do a book on MIG with loads of other info.
I also think a DVD is the way to go. I would also rent a Dynasty and do a side by side with your Syncrowave to show the differences of the advanced squarewave arc.. I frequent all the welding boards and alot of times the most asked beginner TIG questions are Dynasty vs. Syncro, Inverter vs. transformer, Chromoly roll cage welding, and learning to do nice aluminum beads.
You should also post this question at:
http://www.millermotorsports.com/mboard / http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/index.php http://www.hobartwelders.com/mboard /
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On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 04:17:34 GMT, Ernie Leimkuhler

I strongly support the DVD, and dividing the book into main weld processes or publishing separate books on each process. I'd buy the TIG book first, Mig, second, OA third.
I look forward to this one.... most of my current welding books have been a dissapointment, probably due to the lack of feedback (sound, action), like a DVD would give me.
Dan Linscheid
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I'd like to see a good effort put into explaining why certian settings and maneuvers are used when welding instead of just saything "this is the way you do it". Most of the people I introduce to welding (TIG mostly) just want the bare essentials (one guy made little labels for his Syncrowave 250 to go on the switch positions that say "steel" and "aluminum") but don't realize that they're really digging themselves into a rut. Without knowing the finer points they'll never be able to tweak and improvise when something comes up. Or I might be wrong and just overwheming beginners, who knows?
I'd like to see a pretty complete section on filler rod alloys, again with some explanations. Information on the different filler choices for things like 4130 steel or 304 SS are invaluable in a reference book.
Detailed descriptions and pictures of the actual torch movements and filler deposition. All the books I've read have nice pictures of finished products but what I want to see welds with little arrows showing torch movement.
The last thing is some good tips on joint design. The design is what often makes the difference between a bad weld holding and a perfect weld breaking.
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Obviously you have to include the parlor tricks like beer can to beer can.
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Sounds very interesting..
My approach would be some basic theory, some practical exercise ( IOW burning rods ), a walkthrough analysis of the results and explain what went wrong and how to fix it..
Do this for OA, Stick, MIG and TIG..
Move on with some detailed application info on each of the techniques ( For sanitary pipe welding the TIG process is the most widely used because............ heres how to do sanitary welds on stainless pipe.. )
Maybe some generic instructions for misc. welding machines ( what does this button do ?) in the back along with safety instructions..
/peter
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I haven't read all the responses so I don't know if I'm repeating other's ideas... Things I would liked to have known as I followed the path from newbie-ism to my current not-quite-newbie-ism would include:
How to judge how succesful my welding was; how to do destructive testing, tell-tale signs of bad welds.
Properties of metals as they relate to welding: how stong are they, how weldable are they, effects of welding on strength and temper. This doesn't have to in-depth - just a primer on the basics would be a help.
Troubleshooting: both in term of technique and machine settings.
There are other things that have plagued me, but these stand out as significant conundrums.
Peter

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Peter Grey wrote:

...
I read all the responses, and don't recall "how to do destructive testing" mentioned elsewhere. I don't think it takes much explaining on the "how", so fitting it in shouldn't be a problem. (But as JohnM wrote, "You're gonna need wheels for this book if you take even half the advice you've got so far." Maybe that could be a welding project in the book :) Anyway, I think there should also be at least a few paragraphs about the "why" of destructive testing, and how important it is, and how informative and surprising it can be, and why destructive testing should be done by the maker rather than the end user. :)
Do you plan to mention or cover any nondestructive testing methods?
-jiw
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OK Guys after reading the responses I am starting to get an idea of what direction I am going to take.
I am thinking I will follow the pyramid approach. The traditional way to write newspaper articles is to give the most important information at the beginning and then work your way back so the last paragraphs of the article give the greatest detail. I can see this working for welding instruction. Each section would give you the basics up front, of say MIG, like how to set the machine and move the gun, and then digress further as you go into it towards WHY you do those things. If you can catch on fast you don't even have to read the whole section to get started.
First I am going to do a general welding book that covers GAS, MIG, TIG, STICK, Fuel-gas cutting, and Plasma cutting.
A second book will cover just TIG with a lot more info on fabrication.
Each book will have a large reference section in the back, or maybe I will have a third reference book, separate from those 2.
As to the DVD/Video tape, I will do one that accompanies each book. The videos will be available by themselves as well, but will work hand in hand with the books.
I wrote a welding book many years ago, but it was specific to the theatre industry. I never got it published, but it taught me a lot about the publishing world. I have an offer from a fellow who runs a printing house to offer print-on-demand services. So there would be no large upfront cost for printing. As each order comes in, the book is printed and sent out. It seems the safest route. There is a shop here in Seattle that does nothing but DVD and CD-ROM production, called Discmaker. They can easily handle mass producing a DVD, once I have the content.
Feel free to keep making your suggestions as to content. I will keep taking notes.
--
"I love deadlines, especially the wooshing sound they make as
they fly by" - Douglas Adams
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That actually sounds very good. Now you just have to -write- the thing!
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Why not (also) re-view that one and, after any needed updates, publish it the same way?
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Because I re-viewed it a year ago and realized how bad it was now that I know so much more about commercial welding.
I may rewrite it so it is much better, but one book at a time.
--
"I love deadlines, especially the wooshing sound they make as
they fly by" - Douglas Adams
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The more I think about it, the more I realize there is to teach about fitting parts to be welded. What fixtures are easy to make and invaluable, what clamps work well, techniques for welding things when they have to be flat or they have to be square or they have to be at a given angle. I learned really a lot about fitting structural steel when I worked as a shipfitter for 10 years once, but fitting a framework which will support a generator in the engine room of a ship isn't quite like building say a display table to go in the lobby of a museum. What I didn't learn back then was how to use elementary heat forging to fix weldments that got pulled a little out of alignment. Now I just estimate a couple of degrees for the weld to pull something, weld it up solid, check it with a square, and bend it cold or forge it to tolerance whatever that is. I have never seen anything like that in a book, that's where a blacksmith/artist/craftsman can bring real value to a welding text.
Grant
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

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A couple of things that others have not mentioned.
One would be to include a photo of a MIG weld that looks good but is essentially a bead not fused into the parent metal and a photo of how it fails a destructive test. It would be good to get a photo of the weld being made. And of course the same photos of a good MIG weld and how it passes a destructive test.
Another topic to cover is low hydrogen rods. Which metals require that the rod be really dry and what metals you can weld with 7018 that has not been kept dry. And something about rod dryers. I am not convinced that the light bulb in a compact refrigerator are really good enough for when you need Low Hydrogen rod.
Another whole book you could publish would be projects as making anvils, welding tables, go karts, sculptures. You might start taking pictures of things your students build and get releases now , just in case you ever decide to write a second book.
Dan
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One thing that came to mund, was that American writers (probably some liability thing) seems obsessed with safety, please dont start with 5 pages on how to put the plugg into the poweroutlet (I have litterally seen such a book), and we also know were not supposed to do welding on our tothfillings :-) Henning
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Humor. Keep things interesting and we will learn more. Michelle
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

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Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:

You're gonna need wheels for this book if you take even half the advice you've got so far..
What about booklets, wire bound (as someone else suggested).. one for each process, including a reference in the back on alloys, filler for what alloy and common sources of different alloys.
DVD's might work out, dunno. There you run into stuff like filesharing, if that bothers you. Books can also be scanned and fileshared but that'd not be the same as having a quality, friendly book. A DVD isn't as useful in the shop as a good book, at least not in my shop. On the other hand, a DVD can be sold pretty cheap- if you were willing to sell it cheap enough you might not have to worry much about people stepping on your copyright. Retailed on ebay at about $6, they would really sell, should also be cheap enough to discourage pirating.
Best of luck with it,
John
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I think it's quite difficult to get the right balance between theory and practice. It also depends on the person reading the book. I would prefer a book with quite a lot theory.
First of all, I wouldn't like to buy a book that spawns from stick to TIG. Separate the books, or you get a mischmasch of everything without all. :-)
Now, that you (err, I) have decided to write a single book for every process, the contents depends on the welding process. for example O/A and TIG are quite easy to learn, because it's more you setting the pace. You can weld slowly, or fast. If you're good, you can weld fast, if not, then not. For O/A, I still cant weld above 4mm. But I also don't care, I fire up the O/A once a year and use it only for thin stuff. What I want to say, is that it is easier to see what's happening, because you have much more time to observe what's going on, and you also see what the puddle is doing.
Now to the processes:
* O/A-book: would not buy one.
* TIG-book: would not buy, because I don't have a TIG. :-) The one I want costs above 3000 $, I can't afford that. Anyhow, what I'd like to see is: - AC/DC, what for. - AC, selecting the propper frequency - sure how to select the propper rod _and_ how to find the propper rod for say, aluminium. Describe some chemical tests that give the content of Si, Mg, etc. and then a table what rod to use.
* Stick-book: A lot about the propper sticks. A _lot_! - select the right stick for the different positions. Sticks for repair work (eg. CI, SS, etc.). - starting an arc with stick X and AC or DC. Many do have problems with that.
* MIG/MAG-book - selecting gas - setting up. Many people don't have the slightest clue what's right. the bad thing about MIG/MAG is, that the seams often look good, but don't hold what they promise. teach them to check their welds. Now this is a funny aproach, but I think it helps a lot for MIG/MAG: teach them how to make _bad_ welds. for example a push weld, holding the burner flat. Explain what's happening and say they have to cut through the weld and look close at it (maybe some etching). If you know how to make the many possible errors, you also know how to avoid them. Preparation of workpiece.
general: Teach how to observe and _analyze_, how to avoid and improve.
Would I buy a dvd? I think no. A picture shows how to hold the burner, in a picture you can add some hints, lines, whatever. But not in a video. A video makes the project more expensive, without adding _real_ information. Until I get a real good example, I think that videos are for dummies. :-))
Nick
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Motormodelle / Engine Models:
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I support the book. I am a professional firefighter and in the evenings, between runs, I usually read something instead of watching TV and then I can go home in the morning and try out some of what I have learned.
--

Strube
Professional Firefighter
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I also support a book. First of all a DVD can suffer from a miriad of production probelms. The net result could be a lot of work for a very amature looking product. Then you are stuck having done all the work with no place to go with it. Kind of like a bad weld. A book can be fluid. It can be a work in progress. Add information, subtract, re-write, edit, add pictures, illustrations, expand Q&As etc. Print on demand...you and I have talked about this approach. I still feel this is a viable option. Secondly, any kind of video production takes hours and hours to set up shots, edit them, putting it all together so it doesn't look like a home movie. Net cost, even for you own labor is expensive. Do the book(s) by topic...o/a, mig, tig. Market them seperately or as a series. More topics? Just look at our posts on this ng...it's all here. The first edition may not be a masterpiece, but you can take input, improve, sculpting the final product. As with any complicated project, the best advice I can give is to start. -Mike
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From the beginner's standpoint:
I. When to use WHICH process: O/A, stick, wire, TIG, MIG A. Metal types B. Metal thickness C. Expected results 1. Strength of weld 2. Appearance of weld
II. Equipment types, requirements, and limitations A. "Shop" (ie. non-portable) 1. Power/fuel 2. Consumables B. "Semi portable" [portable if you have a Semi] 1. Power/fuel 2. Consumables C. Portable 1. Power/fuel 2. Consumables
III. Techniques A. Safety B. Fundamentals [DVD/VHS demonstrations vital] 1. Basic concepts a. Difference between Soldering, Brazing, and Welding b. Purpose of fluxes and shielding gasses 2. Basic O/A or TIG puddle formation
etc.
[I'm sure that you have your lesson plans engraved in your head and, with your multi-year experience with students, have encountered most of the more-repeated questions and problems! 8-) ]
One thing for sure: try to get the publisher to use a soft "cloth" cover and plastic-coated paper: the book _will_ be seeing _very_ hard use in a wide range of "hostile" environments.
If you still have an archive of your old posts to these two NGs, you can, probably, save yourself weeks of typing by "culling" from them. 8-)
BTW, please let us know when, where, and for how much this set is published. I, personally, intend to order several - I have friends who could stand to learn a lot more - in addition to the set(s) for ME!
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