What is the weight of a Lincoln SA200

Here's a fine specimen of SA-200 welder.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/SA-200.jpg
My question is how much does it weigh.
Thanks guys.
i
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I'll swag it at 1200 to 1500 pounds. On 3/23/2011 12:36 PM, Ignoramus29973 wrote:

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replying to RoyJ, Germandarkgary wrote: Yes the lincoln welder with the f162 and f163 weight is 1500 and the diesel three and four cylinder engines are about 2800
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On 03/23/2011 10:36 AM, Ignoramus29973 wrote:

Something close to 500 pounds, I think.
-bill
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On 3/24/2011 12:45 AM, Winston wrote:

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us/Equipment/Pages/product.aspx?product=K6090-11
Hey, my 1200 to 1500 was right on!
The 1311 pounds is for the unit with a Kubota engine. I think the diesel is a bit heavier than the Continental in Iggy's unit.
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RoyJ wrote:
(...)

http://www.engine.kubota.ne.jp/english/catalog2/index.html
Tips the scales at 403 to 414 lbs. Figure the gas version is within say 100 lbs of that? I dunno.
--Winston
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I picked it up, I think that it is 1150, just by gut feel.
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/tVBBsetbU7ocY5zDhvUnG9xO3bjAhN7B42H-ddOjxhE?feat=directlink
It also came with a heavy duty cart.
i
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The weight is not stated in the downloaded Lincoln manual I got. The figure of 1100+# sticks in my mind, because here in Utah, a trailer that weighs less than 700# does not need to be licensed. The DMV person asked me how much it weighed, and I asked all together, or just the trailer. She said just the trailer. I recall having seen the actual figure, and a SA200 can vary with the different generators they put on them. She said she didn't think the trailer went over 700#, and it was up to me if I wanted to license it or not. Definitely not the exact answer, but I'd guess 1150# with gas, and go from there for leads, gas bottles, trailer, work table, spare, etc, etc, etc.
Actually used mine yesterday. Fired up after about .75 seconds of starter motor. Wonder what's up with that. It usually fires faster than that.
And oh yeah. I just GOTTA put a muffler on it one of these days. It is obnoxiously loud with that straight pipe and rain flap!
But, all in all, it was a decent deal for $300. And then there were the tanks, Victor cutting set, 6 gas welding tips, rosebud, strikers, hoses, leads, rods, spare tire, and assorted tools.
HTH
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Thanks. Mine was $300 and it came WITHOUT tanks and leads.
i
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I have written an e mail to Bill's Welder Repair, they specialize in restoring and rehabbing SA 200's and the likes. I'll post if I get a response.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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A little update. I was able to unload this SA-200 from my truck, which was not exactly trivial. It now sits on a cart and I can move it around, though it is not that easy.
Anyhow, I see several issues.
1) For one reason or another, fuel is not coming out of the fuel tank and down through the bowl. The bown is held by a springy support, which I removed, and the bowl dows not seem to want to come off.
2) I took off an electric fuel valve or pump near the bowl and I will look at it carefully tomorrow.
3) The battery is dead.
4) The fuel line is rotted, fell apatr when I pulled it. I took a part of it and, through it, poured some gasoline into the carb.
5) With fuel added directly to the carb, the welder does start, at least for a couple of seconds. I did not want to annoy my neighbors at midnight, so I shut it off.
I will mess with it somewhat more tomorrow. Probbaly a trip to Napa is in order.
i
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Ignoramus31983 wrote:

Resembles the second item down? http://www.weldmart.com/store/FuelParts.htm     S-5350 Lincoln Style Fuel Bowl Assembly
--Winston
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This is EXACTLY what it is!
And now that I look at it, I think that perhaps I did not add enough gas to the tank, and it simply does not get into the bowl?
How do you take the glass part off?
i
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Ignoramus31983 wrote:

I betcha it is varnished in place.
I suppose one could place the fuel bowl assembly in a parts cleaner basket and give it an overnight bath. Perhaps the solvent would loosen the gunk enough.
Prepare to make a replacement seal, in any event.
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId 51533
--Winston
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-----snip----

Try putting it in a lacquer thinner or acetone bath, and using some sort of vibration (one of those powered toothbrush thingamajigs) to clean it.
I've put old gummed up parts in a lacquer thinner bath in a rubber-lined coffee can and secured them to a jitter-bug type vibratory sander clamped to my workbench. It's a home-made version of an ultrasonic jewelery cleaner, basically. Works like a charm, in much less time than simply soaking them.
--
Tin Lizzie
"Elephant- A mouse built to government specs." - Lazarus Long
  Click to see the full signature.
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When I disassembled mine, the glass bowl was frozen to the 50's technology cork/rubber gasket, and the threaded rod and nut tightening assembly, and the whole thing was pretty much one corroded piece. I took it off completely, and inserted TWO inline replacable gas filters, one for forward flow, and one for any back flow, and for northern/southern hemisphere applications. ;-) I could see that the gasket seal was a site for future problems, and the elimination of it was easy and cheap. I did not price a replacement, but imagine it would have been more than the Joe McGee solution I put in place.
I also noted that the gas intake port is on the front corner of the machine, so when parking it, it is easy to have it suck air when it gets low on gas, and if you either block it, or use the tongue jack to lower the front of the machine by just one degree, it will run entirely dry. Particularly if you have a high bumper truck. I just eyeball it, or put a small magnetic level on it. It ain't much gas of a difference, but it just might get you through that last weld.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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My SA 200 is an obnoxiously loud straight pipe with a rain flap. I want to put a muffler on there. Would any old cheap-o muffler do it, or is there a special one that has the right backpressure? How about the little 12-15 incher or so muffler? I'm sure I'm going to have to build a support bracket, too, and think I'll point it horizontal to keep height down, and not have it pointed up into the rain, although it does have a rain flap. Or maybe 45 it to point the gases and noise up just a little.
Anyone done this? Pointers?
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com
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Farm supply stores should have a suitable muffler.
i
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Back pressure is not an issue with the Continental. Iggy suggested a tractor muffler they are probably the easiest to install http://www.stanleymuffler.com/Store.aspx Just browse until you find something you like ie http://www.stanleymuffler.com/store.aspx?panel=1&categoryid7
You can also use a car muffler. Just stop at your local auto parts place, ask them for a short body muffler that has been sitting there way too long, adapt it as needed. The car muffler will be quieter than the tractor muffler.
For any of these solutions, the biggest thing is to get the input size to fit your pipe. You certainly can make an adapter but why not get the right muffler to start? Lots of choices, not much difference in cost.
Try to install the muffler horizontal and add an output pipe aimed down to avoid the need for a rain cap. If it's gotta go up, absolutely put a rain cap on it. In dry climates, make sure the exhaust isn't aimed at potential fire hazards like dry grass.
You might find that adding one extra 90 degree bend just before the exit does wonders
On 3/26/2011 12:23 PM, Steve B wrote:

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