Volume Purchases of servo connectors

My club is interested in purchasing unassembled servo connectors in volume.Does anyone know any sources?

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Dymond sells them in packs of 40 I think. Pins and housings.
Fred
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Hi,
At our club we purchase them from Farnell. They suit the Futaba Rx's by knive chamfering one corner. Housing ref:865-618 Crimp socket ref:865-795 Crimping tool is a tad expensive...but less than a crashed plane due to poor crimping procedure. Have a look at <http://www.farnell.com
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snipped-for-privacy@swing.be (Daniel) wrote in message

The crimping tool, the exact SAME crimping tool sold for anywhere from $15 to $40 in catalogs, is available at your local Radio Shack for $8.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com (Mathew Kirsch) wrote:

If it's the one I bought at Radio Shack for something like that price, then it's not the same. The proper ones have a bump in the groove for the 22-26 ga. pins that deforms (indents) the top of the crimp, while my RS piece works okay, it doesn't have that shape of the groove. Red Scholefield told me that his crimper (from Cermark, he believes) does it right. And I imagine that the $99 models do too.
--
Charles Wahl < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net>

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Wahl) wrote in message

Hmm, the $40 crimpers I've seen are literally IDENTICAL to the Radio Shack one I have. No bump...
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I have both a Radio Shack cheapo (relatively) crimper and the genuine Molex hand crimper. There is simply to comparison. The cheaper ones just crushes the connector, whereas the well-designed ones folds the "flanges" back in onto the center. If you ever look closely at any factory crimped 22-30ga. connector pins, you'll see how it's supposed to be done.
Then again, that's not to say the $8 crimper doesn't work. If you augmented the crimp with a dab of solder, the connection will be just as strong, if not stronger.
snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com (Mathew Kirsch) wrote in message

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A major problem of soldering them is nobody has anti-wick tweezers. Solder then wicks out the wire and the flex is where the solder stops OUTSIDE the housing!
David
On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 01:05:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Wahl) wrote:

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Charles Wahl wrote:

The easy way is to crimp with pliers, then solder to be sre with just a dab. More and you will scew uop teh self locker.
Then crimp any cable strengthening bits with pliers before final insertion.
If you check teh co nectors and pins are locked before use, its more reliable ELECTRICALLY than a BAD crimp. It may be a tad less reliable mechanically as solder can run up the wire, sitffening it, and leaving a stress concentration a few mm under the insulation. Another reaso to use very little solder.
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Yes, I did say a *DAB* of solder, didn't I? :-) They key is to use just enough solder to keep the wire from pulling out of the crimp and the strengthen the body of the pin, but not enough to wick into the wire. This is not very hard to do with these dinky pins and wires, which heat up very quickly.
As for the "distempering" thing. I doubt it very much. Most of these pins are formed from nothing more than stamped sheet metal. I don't think any manufacturer would bother with the expense of heat-treating them. And being that they are usually made of very soft and ductile tin- or gold-plated copper, there is no work-hardening in the manufacturing process.

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siaubien snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Volfy) wrote in message

No doubt there is a better crimper.
What I'm saying is that some of these R/C suppliers are selling the $8 Radio Shack crimper for $40. Shady bastards.
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I checked my Radio Shack 3 size crimpers this afternoon - there is the bump on the 2 largest openings. The smallest could not possibly have a bump! I remember that to use the smallest, close the crimper slowly to allow the ears to fold over. Just quickly closing them caused a wrinkled crimp. The smallest is for 28-32AWG anyway - too darn small for a servo.
David
On 10 Jul 2003 05:26:53 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com (Mathew Kirsch) wrote:

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radicalrc
John VB

volume.Does
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