Which JR Radio should I buy (Newbie help)

I am semi-new to this hobby, I plan on buying a PT-40 which I know is a great trainer plane. However I plan on sticking around this hobby for awhile
and would like to invest in a radio which I will be able to use later down the line. So I am thinking of a 6 channel but which model do I buy? I don't want pure top of the line but don't mind spending money on a quality radio.
Your help is much appreciated!
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Thanks everyone Jim Koempel
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662 if buying new or 652/642 if buying 2nd hand.

awhile
don't
radio.
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I'm not a JR fan myself, but if you have chosen to go with JR (no matter what anyone says), then I would highly recommend the 8103. Yes, it's more expensive the the 6 channel radios, but you said you were sticking around the hobby for a while. The 8103 will grow with you while anything less in the JR line will be soon outgrown by you. Paying for an 8103 now will save you money later because by the time you're ready to upgrade to a real *serious radio, the 8103 will have served you well and been able to handle 99% of what you throw at it. * Serious radio = JR 10X, Multiplex EVO 9 or 12, or Futaba 9Z.
MJC

awhile
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I read a little and thought JR was better than Futaba? Was what I was reading wrong? What company do others recommend. Like I said I want to be able to use this for awhile and make sure its a 6 channel radio, I don't mind spending money in order to get quality items. I know the saying you get what you pay for and most of the time it's usually right. Thanks everyone Jim

down
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JR and Futaba (Asian) radios use sofware that was licensed from Multiplex about 20 years ago. Multiplex has moved on and it's programming is much more "free" in assigning controls. Specifically, the Multiplex EVO allows to to assign ANY function to ANY control. The Asian radios marry their channels to their controls and will not allow you the freedom (and imagination) of programming that the EVO will allow. That's not to say that the JR and Futaba radios aren't good, they're just not as flexible as the Multiplex EVO. Additionally, all 9 (or 12 channels with the EVO12) are proportional. That means that you can assign proportional movement to any of the 6 standard proportional controls (4 flight axis plus two sliders). The other controls are switches or buttons, including button actually ON the right control stick, and any of those switches and button can be assigned any task you wish. There's lot's more to the story including the fact that the 9Z 9th channel is really just an on-off switch and isn't truly a control in the best sense. Do lot's of research before you invest. I've seen some long threads on www.rcgroups.com that discuss the Multiplex EVO that you might want to wade through in the "Radio" section.
MJC

a
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Not all of the "Asian" radios fix all of the functions to specific controls. The Futaba 9C is a notable exception. Virtually any of its switches can be assigned to any programmable function. But, not everyone appreciates this flexibility. Along with it comes the need to remember which functions are assigned to which models. For many of us, having function labels on switches is a good reminder of what each one does.
Jim - AMA 501383 (remove .nospam to reply)
MJC wrote:

<big snip>
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Not all of the "Asian" radios fix all of the functions to specific controls. The Futaba 9C is a notable exception. Virtually any of its switches can be assigned to any programmable function. But, not everyone appreciates this flexibility. Along with it comes the need to remember which functions are assigned to which models. For many of us, having function labels on switches is a good reminder of what each one does.
Jim - AMA 501383 (remove .nospam to reply)
MJC wrote:

The Futba 9Z and airtronics stylus allows you to assign switches where you want. The 10X does not let you do it. DOUG
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hello,
ok, its all true, but what about pcm???
regards

is
for
later
I
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PCM has an advantage of giving finer control, and has a "failsafe" function. If the receiver loses signal, it defaults to preprogrammed servo settings. IMHO, most modelers will be happy with the cheaper PPM (FM) systems. The failsafe function *might* save your plane in a staight and level situation, but it's not gonna help if you're inverted or in some other strange attitude.
Morris

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Multiplex INVENTED the PCM method for use in receivers!! (and then the Asians followed). The ONLY advantage to PCM is it's failsafe capability, but Multiplex shows yet again that it drives the industry by it's invention of the IPD receivers (PPM, FM - nonPCM) which are also capable of failsafe operation but without the requirement for a PCM signal. It's significant that the people who originally invented PCM (Multiplex) have now dropped it from their newest high end radio, the EVO. Since as goes Multiplex, so goes the rest, you will see PCM fade away in the next several years in favor of PPM IPD receivers that not only allow failsafe programming, but also allow them to be used with ANY brand of FM transmitter on the same frequency. Personally, I have already sold all my high dollar PCM receivers while I could still get good money for them and replaced them all with FM receivers. Even if you don't fly Multiplex equipment, you need to keep up with what they are doing if you want to see where the future of R/C electronics is going. Note that the EVO is available with a synth module that's software selectable (not hardware selectable like the Eclipse "add on" module and others like it that Futaba and JR are coming out with). Not yet, but soon, available will be an all-frequency scanner to go with the EVO synth module. Because Multiplex has taken such a huge step of incorporating synth operation integral to the radio and it's software, I guarantee that in the near future, ALL radios will soon have the option (or standard feature) of having synth capability. The Polk's Tracker II is a good example of this. As crappy a radio as it is with it's stupid programming that seems to have been done by a guy who flunked 3rd grade (AND "Logic" class), IT comes standard with synth built it AND an integral scanner. Like I said, as Multiplex goes, so go the others.
MJC

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Hi MJC and all,

Not quite, patented by Alec Reeves in 1937. But you meant of course that Multiplex was the first one to use it in RC equipment.
See (I had to google for it): www.privateline.com/TelephoneHistory2/reeves.html
Met vriendelijke groet ;-) Ron van Sommeren near Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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Or more correctly, Multiplex was the company that "pioneered" the use of PCM as a method of radio wave transmission specifically for radio control. Reeves came up with only the theory, not the application of the technology, and again, not the specific application of the technology for Radio Control. So I stand by my statement that, with regard to PCM use in Radio Control, Multiplex invented it. The other companies (Futaba, JR, et.al.) were all followers and adapted the technology from Multiplex. The main point I wanted to get across is still valid; that Multiplex is and always has been the technological leader in the R/C radio business. Watch for what Multiplex does and you'll know what the rest are going to do.
MJC

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is
Agreed. BTW, Multiplex is now wholy owned by Hitec.
Groeten ;-) Ron van Sommeren near Nijmegen, the Netherlands
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True, but there is no interaction between the two companies other than for distribution. Multiplex is an autonomous company and is not actually owned by Hitec, but rather, is owned by the same person who also owns Hitec. That's a small but important point because there is no inter-branding between the two companies, and if the owner of both companies is smart, there never will be. Multiplex needs to be allowed to continue the work they are doing without interference from Hitec if Multiplex is to continue as a leader and innovator in the industry.
MJC

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MJC wrote:

Well, I was in West London Models a few months ago and spying some red-coloured micro servos I said : "Are those the Diamond micro servos in a different colour case ?" to which the reply was "No, they're Multiplex servos, actually made by Hitec...". So it looks as if they're inter-branding in the UK at least.
--
Boo



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"Better" depends who you ask. Futaba, JR, and Airtronics all make fine 6 channel systems. Hitec makes a nice 7 channel rig. If you are in a club, or plan to join one, other pilots will be able to help you easier with setup, programming, etc if you have something they are familiar with.
If you'll be flying with an instructor, having a transmitter that is compatible with his trainer cord and buddy box will be helpful; or you might have to buy your own.
I use a Futaba 6XAS and really like it. Several of our club members have bought the Futaba 9C.
We only have a few who fly JR. Futaba and Hitec dominate at our field.
Carrell

get
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Couple of points: The Multiplex EVO 7 channel is NOT in the same league as the 9 and 12 channel EVO's. There is a big jump in functionality from the 7 to the 9/12. The EVO 9 and EVO 12 are similar except for the three additional proportional channels in the 12, and an increase in the number of model memories from 20 (in the EVO) to 36 (in the EVO 12). Both the 9 and 12 channel model have the same number of switches and buttons that can be assigned anywhere you want. Additionally, no one has the EVO beat if you want to go with synth capability. Channel selection in the synth EVO is made in the software so there are no switches to wear out as with the Spectra. I would highly recommend that if you decide on the EVO, go with at least the 9 channel model. By the way, the EVO is compatable with ALL other radios as far as trainer use (buddy box) goes. You just have to have the right connections on either end. The EVO is a 7 pin DIN plug available at any electrical supply house. And again, I'll point out that no radio, except the Multiplex 4000 itself, has the EVO beat in it's flexibility of mixing and use of flight phases (up to 4 per individual model). Also, Hitec and Multiplex are absolutely NOT the same company. The owner of Hitec (an individual) recently bought Multiplex and now owns both companies. The only connection between the two companies is that Hitec is the importer of the Multiplex radios but the two different companies (Hitec and Multiplex) produce two completely different product lines and there is nothing more in commone between Hitec radios now than there was before the owner of Hitec bought Multiplex. What you WILL see is (eventually) much better availability of all Multiplex products in the US because of the new ownership of Multiplex and the fact that Hitec already has a distribution structure in place in the US. Before the purchase of Multiplex, there were only a couple of dealers in the US and Multiplex radios sold here were few and far between.
MJC

be
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Futaba 6XA, or Hitec Eclipse 7. Dr.1 Driver "There's a Hun in the sun!"
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On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 06:13:54 GMT, "James Koempel"
|I am semi-new to this hobby, I plan on buying a PT-40 which I know is a |great trainer plane. However I plan on sticking around this hobby for awhile |and would like to invest in a radio which I will be able to use later down |the line. So I am thinking of a 6 channel but which model do I buy? I don't |want pure top of the line but don't mind spending money on a quality radio. | |Your help is much appreciated! | |REMOVE NOSPAM TO EMAIL ME | |Thanks everyone |Jim Koempel
I have the HiTec Eclipse 7. But that new JR 6102 is very interesting. Also the Multiplex Evo 7, 9 or 12 (HiTec and Multiplex seem to be the same company).
I am a beginner as well. I wanted to have a six channel as a starter radio instead of one of the 4 channel units. More room to grow.
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