Fanul, Fadal Haas Controls - what is up with this?

On 15 Feb., 07:01, snipped-for-privacy@rise.zzn.com wrote:


Really. Are you probing castings? What happens when when the machinists running your machines (or do you have button pushing idiots because like Joe788 or Tom Brewer you're afraid of employing anyone who can think and program) hit hard spots in the material and the program needs to be adjusted?
You say you do aerospace work so if you're serious about aerospace I'd think you would be doing plenty of castings.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA jonbanquer.blogspot.com/
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Jon, we answered your questions. Why don't YOU answer OURS? Embarrassed, are you?
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

These ads should be a red flag that the owner is looking for someone to "push buttons" and has a low pay ceiling in mind. The ad should read things like, "XX number of years experience, knowledge of feeds, speeds, materials, basic gcode editing skills, team player, etc..." Every shop I've worked at (and there's been a few...) had controls of all shapes and sizes. It's NEVER about the control.
-- Bill
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pyotr filipivich wrote:

This is a sad example of the dumbing down of our entire culture. Even fields that rely on skills and technology are afflicted.
Too many people, because of their ignorance, think that programming or using the control is what machining is all about. Imagine stepping into the cockpit of a space shuttle and oggling all the instruments. To someone who doesn't understand them, they look daunting, and it appears that learning the meaning of all the switches and buttons, and the purpose of all the dials and gauges, is what's needed to get into space. The little details, like how a rocket motor works, why you need a heat shield, or what's likely to go wrong and how to deal with it, are completely lost in the fear/envy/hunger about learning the buttons and readouts.
Machine operators are the same way. There are too many people who "know" Fanuc controls, or Hass controls, or Mazatrols, who DON'T know which end of a drill bit is the business end. What our industry needs is people who know how to cut metal.
For those who don't know the basics, and the reasons for them, the control becomes everything, including a scapegoat. "I know how to do this. I'm just not used to the way this control works. At my last job, the offsets were all incremental. Here, I have to enter the whole value. That takes some getting used to." This, as a way to explain the fact that a $400 milling cutter just welded itself to a $4,000 fixture because:
A. Somebody was too busy worrying about how to code the program, and didn't pay enough attention to even attempting to understand what was actually being programmed.
B. Somebody had no clue about the right and safe ways to proof a program. "If I code it right, then it's right. What could go wrong?"
C. Somebody spent too much time learning the meanings of all those parameters in a pocket milling cycle, and not enough time learning that 8,000 SFM and 3.5 IPR feeds don't work real well in pre-hardened 4140.
D. Somebody who knew how to enter an offset had no idea what an offset actually is, how it works, or why.
Managers, and especially human resources folks, have all had too many bad experiences with people with this kind of "knowledge", and believe enough of the lies and excuses to try to deal with them. So they look for people who know what the last idiot claimed was his biggest problem, even though that person really was an idiot.
Think about hiring a carpenter based on whether he was experienced with a Stanley hammer, as opposed to a Craftsman, without regard for whether he know how to work with wood.
It's self defeating, and far, FAR too common.
KG
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A better example is someone who can only use AutoCRAP and who then complains about "dumbing down or our entire culture."

Posters like this one don't have clue one about how valuable having a Haas control is for quickly and effectively dealing with the kinds of problems that often come up in a machining job shop. All they know is Fanuc or Mitsubishi and think this kind of control is adequate. Usually people like this have had their own business and failed because they really have no clue what the market really needs.

"A competitive world offers two possibilities:
You can lose. Or if you want to win you can change. Lester Thurow US economics professor.
That means moving forward from AutoCRAP and Fanuc. Posters like this one fight change at every step.

Yup. That's exactly what it is if you use AutoCRAP, Fanuc, Mastercam, etc. and don't think there is a better way
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA www.jonbanquer.blogspot.com/
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On Sat, 14 Feb 2009 20:45:07 -0800 (PST), jon_banquer

I guess it's needed when it's attached to a POS machine.
It was you Jon who recently was complaining about your Haas wasn't it? You know your multiple rants in here and in your blob.
-- Tom http://tinyurl.com/5okkgz
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