Harley Buys M V Augusta

The title says it all:
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/engineering/article4319192.ece
Best,
Steve
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Steve Saling
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Whatever it takes to make a better sport bike and sell into a market that Harley traditionally has not been very good at.
It would be nice to have a real sport bike engine made in the U.S.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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wrote:

Whatever it takes to make a better sport bike and sell into a market that Harley traditionally has not been very good at.
It would be nice to have a real sport bike engine made in the U.S. ===============================What a cupla ignerint-assed irrelevant statements. Really belongs on the jb blog.
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Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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Whatever it takes to make a better sport bike and sell into a market that Harley traditionally has not been very good at.
It would be nice to have a real sport bike engine made in the U.S.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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From an asshole obsessing about used parts for a 1994 Sierra. goodgawd....
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Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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Whatever it takes to make a better sport bike and sell into a market that Harley traditionally has not been very good at.
It would be nice to have a real sport bike engine made in the U.S.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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Proctologically Violated wrote:

What's wrong with old cars and used parts? I need a windshield wiper assembly (housing, linkage, motor, everything) for my 92 Merc Marquis and although I much prefer putting OEM Ford parts on my vehicles (vs aftermarket shit) such an assembly purchased from a dealer would cost more than the car is worth. It's simply a matter of being practical.
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Black Dragon

Call for Ms. Lingus, Ms. Connie Lingus...
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"What's wrong with old cars and used parts?"
He can't fix them without burning them up like he did when he tried to wire his FADAL..
"I much prefer putting OEM Ford parts on my vehicles (vs aftermarket shit) such an assembly purchased from a dealer would cost more than the car is worth. It's simply a matter of being practical."
Agree. A lot of aftermarket stuff is pure garbage.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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Operative words: HIS Fadal.. As in, That which I **own**. You own exactly what, jb? Yer Blog???????????????
re burntid up Fadal: AND, I managed to restore an $8,000 spindle drive for $200. Great company in NJ, should anyone need it. AND, I replaced the burntid out regenerative resistors with heating elements I had hanging around....
AND, as per previous posts, I proly have the most pimped-out fur-coated Fadal around, including a coolant pump that can be switched on with the machine off (my filling station/spray wash), AND a winch for the loading/unloading the unbelievably heavy 4th axis....
YOU have modified..... what?? A 1994 Sierra???? And sheeit, you need remedial help for THAT. And manual contouring.

Yeah, you agree NOW, asshole, after half a dozen people over at rec.autos.tech **explained it to you**, you whiney bleating deranged sycophant. Cliffs HousePainter post.
And you woudn't know an MV Augusta from a self-propelled lawn mower.... or likely, a hot dog cart.
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Mr. P.V.'d (formerly Droll Troll), Yonkers, NY
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"What's wrong with old cars and used parts?"
He can't fix them without burning them up like he did when he tried to wire his FADAL..
"I much prefer putting OEM Ford parts on my vehicles (vs aftermarket shit) such an assembly purchased from a dealer would cost more than the car is worth. It's simply a matter of being practical."
Agree. A lot of aftermarket stuff is pure garbage.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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Thing is BD, that part you buy aftermarket is most likely the *IDENTICAL* item to the OEM, made on *EXACTLY* the same production line, by the same people. It just doesn't have the FORD logo on it. Most OEM parts supply contracts also cover the aftermarket segment of the business. Normally, while the product is still in series production, no aftermarket parts can be made, only supplies to the OEM parts stream (including dealer parts sales). As soon as the series production stops, then aftermarket sales can begin, abiet without the OEM logo on the parts. But, these parts are made on the same exact production line with the same tooling, materials and quality specifications as the originals (normally). This normally occurs for several years after series production ends.
Now when you get into aftermarket sales, then after a while you also have the china/india/etc knock-off reverse engineered designs start popping up for 1/3 the price. Normally though, if you buy it from a name brand like Clevite or Sealed Power, etc it'll be the genuine article.
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Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
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Anthony wrote:

I don't buy that theory.
Moog coil springs. Junk. When I bought my Merc used, I put new Moog springs on all four corners. (that's one of the first things I do to any used car, I like my vehicles to handle properly) Year and a half later found a broken piece of coil in the driveway. Dismissed it as must have feel off the junk my kids friends drive. A few days later noticed the front of the Merc was sitting a bit low. Both Moog springs broke. Pair of OEM springs from Ford dealer cost ~$60 more than the Moog units and I'm quite confident they'll sag and not break like the originals.
Moog tie rods, links, ball joints, etc. Junk. Same with TRW. OEM doesn't cost a lot more but lasts much longer.
I used to like Moog parts. Years ago they made good stuff, doesn't seem to be that way today.
Aftermarket radiator hoses, belts, seals, ignition wires, etc, all junk. I've had better results spending a few more bux on OEM parts.
Dana and Spicer drive train parts. OK, it's pretty tough to go wrong there since they're original equipment on many vehicles.
Bendix and Raybestos brake rotors. Junk. I like Bendix brakes. My wife is a total psycho bitch from hell on her brakes and the only rotors that last more than two years on her Merc are OEM. And they have enough meat on them to turn once.
My opinion is if you're going to fix it and keep it OEM is the way to go.
It hurts sometimes though. $230 for a stinkin' water pump for the 1.9L in my wifes Merc! I'm not sure, and neither was the dealer, but it might be a Mazda engine which might explain the price. :/
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Black Dragon

One evening a guru had coitus
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On Tue, 15 Jul 2008 01:56:41 +0000 (UTC), Black Dragon

When did you marry my Sister-in-Law?
LOL, Tom
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l:
Excellent post that tells it like it is.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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wrote:
snipped
Excellent post that tells it like it is.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
Just like "The Jon Banquer Blog"!!!!
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Black Dragon wrote:

BD, I agree. The same applies when you need to get body work done. There is a huge difference between prices for parts. I can get a windshield installed parts and labor for $125, or I can get a quality OEM windshield only for 2-3 times that amount.
Things being made in the Turd World is the problem in my opinion, plus now days you have at least a generation of people who do know or appreciate quality.
Best, Steve
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Steve Saling
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Garlicdude wrote:

I believe one of the problems is trying to compete with the turd world and doing it by cutting back on the quality of materials to save costs. The same brand aftermarket products I was using in the 80's and early 90's are not holding up near as well now as they did then. My answer to that is to spend the extra money, and it's not much more, on OEM products.
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Black Dragon

QOTD:
"I met her [his fiance] over lunch on Thursday. She had a firm
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wrote:

Whatever it takes to make a better sport bike and sell into a market that Harley traditionally has not been very good at.
It would be nice to have a real sport bike engine made in the U.S.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
JonBlobber,
Do you mean a real sport bike engine like this: http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/firstrides/122_0507_radical_c1_990/photo_14.html
which was designed and built in the U.S.? As usual, you are without a clue.
Your Pal, ffredd
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As per usual "Wrong Said Fred" Fichus finds an esoteric exception and pathetically tries to make it into something it's not. In this case that would be a mass-market success or even something that is actually marketed. This isn't even a street bike or one that is available, Fichus.
"The MotoCzysz 07 C1 990 is the latest development of the bike that Czysz hopes will return an American manufacturer to international road racing to compete for a world championship."
Hey Fichus, here's a bike for you... Notice I don't claim it's a mass market success or try and make it out to be something it's not like you most often do:
http://www.realclassic.co.uk/banq03112600.html
Good name, Banquer Superior don't you think? Fits. ;>)
Much better than say The Fichus Fungus.
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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http://thekneeslider.com/archives/2005/06/10/motoczysz-c1-990 /
"Because a bike is leaned side to side to turn, if the crank sits longitudinally in the chassis gyroscopic force is a non issue. This is because you are not changing the direction of the crank axis when changing lean angle. Inertial force of the crank comes into play but only when the crank is changing speed. Im not sure if Czysz understands the difference. If he did I do not think he would have even bothered drawing the counter rev. motor.
Here is the point that I know Czyzs does not get. Even a transversely mounted motor is of little effect on motorcycle handling because the gyroscopic precession is contained within the chassis. Imagine a motorcycle engine in a stand that allows it to rotate freely from side to side(at a right angle to crank rotation). If that motor is at 0 or 15,000 rpm it will rotate side to side with the same effort because the test stand resists the torque from precession. A motorcycle is a rolling engine stand that rotates freely from side to side. The gyroscopic precession from the crank is a non-factor in motorcycle turning effort regardless of engine layout. When a motorcycle with a transverse crank that spins forward is changing lean angle to the right the torque generated from precession tries to spin the entire motorcycle around to the right and vice-versa when leaning left. This is a considerable force when a crank is spinning upwards of 15,000rpm. The problem for Czysz is that the rider never feels it because the force is contained within the chassis. The irony is that in the layout just described the precession from the engine pushes the triple clamp in the direction that the bike is being leaned which would assist counter steering therefore if anything reducing steering effort. The effect is so small that it does not matter. The net gain from Czyszs counter-revolution engine is ZERO. Here is a simple experiment to demonstrate that crank precession plays no role in steering effort. Sit on a stationary motorcycle and rock it side to side. It does not matter if engine rpm is 0 or 15,000 the effort to lean the stationary bike side to side is unchanged. I did it on my zx10 from idle to 9,000rpm. I can think of no reason why this experiment would not be valid. If you have ridden a motorcycle at a high rate of speed then you know that a motorcycle is harder to turn the faster you go, but the crank is not the reason. If you were to pin the throttle of a stationary bike and let it fall, it would fall to the ground at the same rate regardless of crank orientation. Precession from the crank does not resist lean. The motoczysz bike is designed around a lack of understanding of how a simple gyroscope works. Gyroscopes do not produce some vague resistance that cannot be defined. When a gyroscope is twisted about its axis it generates torque at a 90 degree angle. If you grasp that, you understand that the counter rev engine does not improve handling."
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA http://jonbanquer.blogspot.com /
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