More Off Topic Machining Questions For This Political Group

Here is yet another Jon Banquer post that ruins this newsgroup.
Do you think a CNC machine shop should purchase one of these and check
their draw bar pressure on a regular basis?
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If so, does your shop own one?
Jon Banquer
San Diego, CA
Reply to
jon_banquer
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You're a little late to the party. This was discussed this month and an option given on how to check draw bar pressure using simple tool.
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
Here ya go:
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[ Newsgroups: alt.machines.cnc From: "over a barrel" Date: Sun, 21 Sep 2008 Subject: Re: Loose retention knobs.... ]
Reply to
brewertr
Well, sorta gotta give this one to jb -- Sam does talk in a sort of code, you know -- and as we all well know (all except jb of course) jb has pretty limited reading comprehension under the best of circumstances.
What was the simple tool? I remember a reference to a crowbar, which kind of gave me the shivers.... Mebbe a spring scale on said crowbar, then r x F?? :)
Reply to
DrollTroll
Yes, shops should check their drawbar tension. Not enough tension is bad for finish. We've had one for quite some time. Guy who invented it sold us one of his first ones.
Later,
Charlie
Reply to
Charlie Gary
I didn't say use it, I said the subject was already discussed this month (including that particular drawbar pressure gage) and an option given using a simple tool.
There was a day when drawbar pressure gages didn't exist and yet people needed to check it just the same.
Tom
Reply to
brewertr
Charlie,
How often do you check yours?
Have you ever found it out and had to replace the drawbar?
It's Later,
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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Reply to
jon_banquer
We check them once every two or three months. We have found broken spring washers after checking tension and finding it lacking. A new stack of washers and we're good for however many years they'll go. We don't count tool changes, so I have no idea how many cycles the washers are good for.
Later,
Charlie
Reply to
Charlie Gary
To each his own then I guess buy or fab a dedicated gage it's your money--even though it would be next to impossible even for a complete idiot to damage your preciousss big-plus spindles with using a crowbar as I had described...
Whatever the case, the crowbar method is simple, cheap, quick, and effective--and in the absence of any other method, using it will help greatly in otherwise avoiding a serious risk to life and property.
Reply to
Bipolar Bear
Right, to each his own.
I see your crow bar as being similar to the dovetailed aluminum jaws I've made for years and had no problems with for plastic parts. I still prefer my aluminum dovetailed jaws to Talon grips. They're quite safe if one isn't an idiot... despite your assertions otherwise. ;>)
Jon Banquer San Diego, CA
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Reply to
jon_banquer
Might be tough to get the crowbar into a gap that isn't there. ============================
That's what sledgehammers are for. Requires two people, tho. :)
Reply to
DrollTroll
He got tossed a curve ball, may not have known about the BIG PLUS Face & Taper spindle.
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Tom
Reply to
brewertr

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