Safety Heads Up - Eye Bolts

Inspect eye bolts before and after EVERY time you use them.
This 1" eye bolt was hanging on an eye bolt rack in our shop just waiting
to severely injure or kill someone.
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It is said a picture is worth a thousand words.
Let 'em flow...
Reply to
Black Dragon
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Why do I get the feeling under that nut that's tack welded on, there's more cracks... Good thing you caught that for sure!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Anderson
I think if a 3rd party Safety Officer were to look at the way it has been installed some of your company managers heads would roll.
Placing the nut in that position allows the stud section to see a greater stress due to lever action.
An eye bolt should be tightened down to ITS flange.
Reply to
(!)
What's up with the nut? Looks like it's been rigged to screw into dirty holes. Some shortcuts just ain't worth the risk.
Reply to
Charlie Gary
Says a lot about the person who put it back on the rack.
Reply to
brewertr
I should have known some high road traveling fuckwit was going to come along and point out the blindingly obvious.
However, in an ideal world you would indeed be correct. Unfortunately nobody works in that non-existent ideal world.
Reply to
Black Dragon
The nut is there to add rigidity when used in handling holes to shallow for the full length of the thread. Although not the best condition, a shoulder via a nut is far better than no shoulder at all. The nut wasn't put there to "repair" any cracks.
Nut or no nut, my point is don't take your eye bolts for granted, they should be inspected with every use.
Reply to
Black Dragon
Chains as well.
JC
Reply to
John R. Carroll
Instead of cutting off some of the threads, just tack a bolt to it to shorten them. Sounds like the real fuckwit works in the same shop as you.
Reply to
sittingduck
Another high road traveling fuckwit drools on his keyboard.
Reply to
Black Dragon
Black Dragon wrote in news:ggsf7l$kvj$ snipped-for-privacy@bdhi.local:
BD, There is no stress-relieving fillet at the area of maximum stress when a nut is used on a thread like that. This is why it broke where it did. It is _much_ safer to shorten the threads on the eye bolt than to weld a nut on it and move the stress concentrations to the middle of a thread root. The result is what you see in the pictures. The nut being welded on in that manner is asking for a very heavy object to fall from some height when the bolt snaps off.
I'll agree _ANY_ lifting equipment should be inspected before and after _EVERY_ use.
Reply to
Anthony
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Application/Installation a.. The receiving hole should be counter-sunk and be free and clear of any debris to assure proper seating b.. LOADS SHOULD ALWAYS BE ALIGNED TO THE PLANE OF THE EYE, not at an angle to the plane. A steel washer or spacer may be used in conjunction with Shoulder Eye bolts to attain proper load alignment. The thickness of the steel washer or spacer must not exceed one thread pitch. c.. Angular lifting should be avoided. Angular lifts significantly reduce rated capacities. See Eye bolt Rated Capacities/Guidelines d.. Check seating after applying an angular lift since the initial lift may cause the bolt to back away from the load. If such occurs, it should be unloaded & properly reseated. e.. For applications with untapped through-holes, longer length Shoulder Eye bolts are recommended, using a steel washer and a nut for the required thread length of engagement. f.. Shoulder bolt tapped holes are to have a threaded length which allows for full length of shank engagement and clearance for the unthreaded portion of shank. g.. Shoulder bolts must be firmly seated and flush against the mating surface; otherwise, the rated capacity is reduced significantly. The use of a steel washer is permissible and may be required; however, the thickness must not exceed one thread pitch. h.. Plain Eye bolt tapped holes are to be threaded for full length engagement of the Eye bolt. i.. Plain bolts must have full thread shank engagement, allowing for one-half turn for proper eye-alignment to obtain rated capacities.
Inspection/Maintenance Safety a.. Eye bolts should be inspected and installed by a competent person who is knowledgeable about the application and installation. b.. Each bolt must be completely inspected BEFORE each use for possible defects such as: distortion, bent shank/threads, or incomplete/incorrectly formed threads. Periodic inspection of bolts is highly recommended. c.. Eye bolts should not be painted or otherwise coated when used for lifting; such coatings make it difficult to inspect for defects or wear indicators. d.. Bolts should not be left where they can incur mechanical damage or corrosion. e.. Destroy bolts when signs of bend, elongation, wear or damage are visible. Such signs indicate that the bolt has been stressed (overloaded) beyond rated capacity. Never attempt to repair a stressed bolt. f.. Destroy bolts when they show signs of alteration. Signs include: gouging, undercutting, welding, etc. g.. Proper Destruction of an Eye bolt: crushing or cutting clear across the eye of the bolt.
Safety Precautions a.. DO NOT work, stand or crawl around the load of the Eye bolt. Ensure a safe distance from the load. b.. DO NOT use wrenches, crowbars, etc. to tightening Eye bolts. Hand tighten is recommended. c.. DO NOT use a single eye bolt to lift a load that can rotate. Safety Swivel Hoist Rings are recommended for such loads. d.. DO NOT force hooks or any other fittings into the eye;they must fit freely. e.. DO NOT exceed the rated capacity. f.. DO NOT SHOCK LOAD BOLTS. Gradually increase lifting of the load to minimize load-shock. g.. DO NOT weld bolts, or perform any weld-repair on the bolts. h.. DO NOT machine Eye bolts on the shank or shoulder to achieve proper seating. i.. Do NOT expose bolts to extreme environmental conditions, as they may adversely affect the rated capacity.
Rated Capacity Guidelines a.. The minimum threaded shank length of an Eye bolt must be one thread diameter to attain the rated capacity. b.. No greater load should be applied to a bolt than the rated capacity listed. c.. Angular lifts significantly reduce Shoulder Bolt Rated Capacities. Shoulder bolts should not be used for angular lifts greater than 45°; Safety Swivel Hoist Rings are recommended for such applications. d.. Plain Eye bolts are not recommended for angular load applications. Safety Swivel Hoist Rings are recommended for such applications.
1/4 500 125 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 5/16 900 225 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 3/8 1,300 325 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 7/16 1,800 450 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1/2 2,400 600 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 9/16 3,000 800 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 5/8 4,000 1,000 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 3/4 5,000 1,250 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 7/8 7,000 1,750 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1 9,000 2,250 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1 1/8 12,000 3,000 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1 1/4 15,000 3,750 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1 1/2 21,000 5,250 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 1 3/4 28,000 7,000 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 2 38,000 9,500 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended 2 1/2 56,000 14,000 Safety swivel hoist rings recommended
Note: Plain Eyebolt angular rated capacities are significantly lower than Shoulder Eyebolt rated capacities; therefore, angular lifting is not recommended.
Reply to
Bipolar Bear
from your attitude and language maybe you are the person that did the dastardly deed.
Reply to
(!)
don't you just love the riggers tongue.................
Reply to
(!)
Awww, he's ok.... He just likes coming off as someone special. And he found a new little jibe to try out, and couldn't help using it twice. :D
Reply to
sittingduck
I suspect he's an Umpa-Lumpa with L O V E on his fingers, tattoos with Mum on and cries at weepy films.....don't you.
Reply to
(!)
I think he's trying to say it was a different nut.
Reply to
sittingduck
I see you have removed the link............is that for fear of retribution.
Reply to
(!)
Wow. I've never seen a grammar lame on Usenet before. That's some incredible originality you've got there! What's next? A speling lame perhaps?
Reply to
Black Dragon

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