Oven fuse

I am going to ask the same question a different way.
Does an oven have internal over current protection?
I have been trying to find a site that sells fuses for ovens but I
haven't found any. Some sites sell thermostats. You would think these would also carry fuses if they existed.
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Terry wrote:

Some do, some don't. Without the make and model number, we're pissing in the dark here. I worked in an appliance parts call center, and we never proceeded further with a customer until we knew those two vital bits of information.
You haven't been electrocuted then? (He has started a new thread because he didn't like the answers he got when he cockily said "You'd have to be a retard to get shocked by 220v". He got put right.)

Fuse Testing:
If the oven light, stovetop fluorescent light, clock or range outlet does not function correctly, often the problem can be a blown fuse or a tripped circuit breaker. Many electric ranges include a fuse in the 120-volt circuit that operates such items as oven and stovetop lights, the electric clock, convenience outlets, etc. In order to check the fuses on your electric range, the following steps should be taken:
1. Before repairs or testing can begin you must disconnect the electricity at the fuse panel, at the circuit breaker panel, or by pulling the plug. Make sure the power is off before proceeding. A jolt from 220 volts can be fatal, use caution!
2. Refer to the owner's manual or to the wiring diagram for your electric range to locate the fuse you need to examine. The type of fuse used in electric ranges is usually the plug-type. This type has a threaded metal base (similar to a light bulb's base) and a flat top marked with an amperage rating. The fusible link is visible through a glass window in the top.
3. Visually inspect the fuse to see if it has blown. The fusible link is visible through a glass window in the top. If the fuse is good, this link will be intact. If the fuse has blown due to an overload, this link will be visibly broken. If the link is broken and the glass window is also blackened, this indicates a short circuit. In either case, the problem that caused the blown fuse MUST be identified and corrected before installing a new fuse of the correct amperage rating.
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IMO they all should have some kind of built in over current/over temperature (especially outside of the "envelope") but generally speaking, they don't.

The quick and dirty way to check this out is to put in a replacement fuse and use the "smoke test." Fuses do fail because they are in a hot area and have been run "hot" for long periods of time.
Likewise, when a CB trips the initial response is to reset and see how long it "holds."
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| I am going to ask the same question a different way. | | Does an oven have internal over current protection?
I've seen a circuit breaker on a convenience outlet on one oven. I've seen schematics of another and it definitely had no fuses shown.
| I have been trying to find a site that sells fuses for ovens but I | haven't found any. Some sites sell thermostats. You would think these | would also carry fuses if they existed.
If they have fuses, they are likely to be common types.
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|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net wrote:

Comment. I used to run a school cafeteria. Some eight years ago one of the stoves was replaced. When it arrived it had 'no internal fuses'! It was fed from a wall outlet that had a 40 amp 230 volt breaker some 20 feet away. Sure enough some wiring deteroriated and burnt up inside the stove and then fused to the metal frame, tripping the 40 amp breaker!
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terry wrote: s.

In the UK where I am, electric cookers rarely have fuses except for accesories such as lamps, clocks, etc. They are commonly wired to fused & DP switched 30A 230v outlet boxes right behind the appliance. More than a metre of cable would be considered very bad practice (and expensive!)
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I think not, UK uses double pole 40A/45A switched outlets. They are not fused outlets.
I've never installed a switch fuse on a domestic cooker.
Though I have done several industrial ovens on 63A switch fuses.
sQuick..
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Any I have seen had screw in fuses hidden behind the top panel where the controls are located. These are same as used to be used in entrance panels in homes and should be available at hardware stores. Just ask for "fuses" The schematic which is usually on the back of the stove will indicate the fuses.
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Don Kelly snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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I concur, I have seen flip-up-the-top-panel style stoves with fuses (about five fuses) that were screw in type, they looked like ordinary panelboard fuses. I just checked my stove here, there is what appears to ba single reset button. Who knows, could be for the 120V.
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