Broke Key inside Lock

I went to get copies of my master lock on my storage shed. Lost the key
and never bothered to test the copy. Turns out the copy was bad and
made on cheap metal since it broke off inside the lock. What should I
do. This is one of those heavy duty masterlocks with the shield over the
keyhole (silver)
Any way I can get this lock off? Can these be hacked off?? doubt it so
what to you do to get this fixed??
Cheers
Reply to
sharifrashedi
Loading thread data ...
Yes, with a LOT of work. Probably much more work than it's worth.
If you can extract the broken piece of the key (you may need to lift pins out of the way to do so, while pulling it back with a bent pin or straightened fishhook or some similar thin hook or ply), you can take both pieces to a locksmith and s/he may be able to measure them and cut a new key for that lock.
Alternative is to get a locksmith to extract the piece for you and then either make a key for that lock or remove the lock and issue you a replacement.
Be glad it's hard to remove. That means it's doing the job you purchased it for.
Next time, put one of the two original keys in a Safe Place, and/or write down the lock code and put that aside. I recommend that folks pick a specific place where they'll keep spares and codes, so they know where to go looking for them when they need them. (A zip-lock bag and/or small box and/or keychain, in a drawer or on a hook someplace in the house.)
Reply to
Joe Kesselman
And use a locksmith to cut extra keys - they will use reasonably made blanks and keep their machines accurate. One local locksmith had a sign saying they would not guarantee keys cut from xxxxx keys (well known chain who uses steel blanks - urg!).
Reply to
Peter
"sharifrashedi" snipped-for-privacy@speakeasy.net wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@speakeasy.net...
should always test copies.
it peobably broke of because ya tried to force it.
try to remove the broken key from the lock and take it to a locksmith. or call the locksmith out to your location.
g'day
Reply to
"Key
never seen a steel blank yet,,, BUT if i get handed one from the BIG store W******, i flat tell them NO guarantees AT ALL.. --Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
Also, some of the blanks that the big-daddy store uses are "generic" within certain terms. I've seen flat steel, but big daddy don't deal with that too much--not enough slop.. For example, if some company makes two slightly different keyblanks that will fit the same keyway. So big daddy makes one in between.Saves them from making two different blanks. Economical-Looks great on the paper budget, but sucks when it comes to doing good accurate key generation or duplication in real time and in real life. I've seen improper tip angles, shoulder cuts off by .017 or more, just to mention a few.
Given that, it is more probable that the key blanks is "generic", and I am 98% sure that the machine was off-so copied cuts are off-and pin tumbler locks like master-especially a lightly used one, will not accept such slop. Take the broken key back to big daddy and demand your money back.
Find a real "LockHead" who checks his own work. They are worth it.
Later, goma.
Reply to
goma865
"Peter" snipped-for-privacy@parazzdise.net.nz> wrote in message
One local locksmith had a sign saying
Ahh, .... we have the same company here in OZ. I 'LOVE' their work. We make good money from people that were foolish enough to have them copy their keys, ... broken keys in locks, ... locked out as key won't turn, etc etc. And it's not as if they (company) are cheap with their prices, usually around $8 for a LW4 copy, on a crap steel blank. I also warn people that I will not guarantee a dupe from a M.M. copy. I suppose when your key cutting booth is set up in the middle of a major shopping mall and rent costs you $6000 per week, ya got to cut a squillion keys just to make rent !!. Imagine how fast their cutters wear down, cutting steel blanks all day. No wonder they can't keep up with accurate machine adjustments. I love their work, :-))
Reply to
Steve Paris

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.