Scaling beyond 130nm dead or alive?

Maybe not so obvious from the eye catching title but the EE Times text moderates it a little to say that "_traditional_ scaling" is dead. So
it depends on what you mean traditional scaling.
What do we mean by scaling anyways? Dennard from IBM set up some "rules" way back in the 20th century saying CMOS designs can be "scaled" by simultaneous and correlated reduction in things like oxide thickness, length, width, supply voltages, junction depth, and doping. The idea being that you can take any CMOS VLSI chip, multiply everything by the magic scaling number, run it through newer tools and like a cookie recipe: you get the same design at lower cost per chip. The magic number is traditionally set at 71% shrink (e.g. 65nm/90nm) per generation to area shrinks by half a la Moore's law.
Truth is it doesn't quite worked out quite so neatly. And each generation it's getting harder to pretend that "scaling" applies at all. Parameters "scale" unevenly -- at "65nm" maybe only one parameter is actually equal or less than 65nm -- in spite of what the "rules" say it should be. I get the sense that the IBM guy is talking about these rules being dead rather than CMOS being dead.
Just FYI, these 90/65/45 nm "node" values are becoming something of a marketing gimic... like CPU clock speed. For example read: http://www.eet.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID 311172
But better believe that if Intel spends $2B, there is still some economic sensibility to it. *Something(s)* about the new process will be 65-ish nm or smaller. To make economic sense it will be also be faster or cheaper or more complex or some other definition of "better". In the end, the rules that count {for this scope of discussion anyways} are economic rather than physical.
-Lee

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This is exactly my question. Are those 65 or 45 nm real CMOS dimensions or that are fake "equivalent" numbers, that only represent higher computer power? If second is the case, then some definitions for "equivalency" must already be revealed, but I've never heard about that yet.
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