#3 Morse Taper Hand Drill?!?


I'm in the industrial drilling industry and struggling to understand why
would someone want a MT3 equipped, electrically powered hand drill...
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I guess there are indeed legitimate needs for it, but... Well... I can
only pray I never have that need!
Talk about a wrist twister if you're not smart.
Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
(800) 871-5022
01.908.542.0244
Automatic / Pneumatic Drills:
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Spindle Drills:
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Tapping:
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Site:
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V8013-R
Reply to
Joe AutoDrill
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Structural steel site work I imagine.
I imaging the average structural steel site worker is a bit beefier than most of us desk jockeys.
Reply to
Pete C.
And, the manual warns that if there's any chance of binding, you want to brace the handle against something solid.
But that is certainly a big-ass drill.
Reply to
rangerssuck
My guess is that it is for people who want to drill large holes.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3537
Anyone preparing to use a drill like that needs to see "Wallace and Gromit, A Grand Day Out". I won't say why -- just watch the rocket building sequence and you'll understand.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
I've used a similar Milwaukee to drill ~3" holes for conduit in industrial JIC control enclosures. When the hole saw jammed the handles would coast a quarter turn no matter what was in the way, so I had to hold the drill at an angle inside the cramped enclosure.
jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I had a 3/4 HP..yes..three quarter horsepower hand drill once upon a time. Damned thing weighed about 10 lbs and would not turn much over 200 rpm. Huge gear box on the front of the drill...
But when you hung the bit...there simply was no way to stop it from twisting. I put 18" bars on it..and it would still twist anyone who was hanging on to it.
Guy came over..wanted to borrow a drill to punch a hole under the bed of his pickup truck for some reason and I told him where the drills were and kept on working on my project. About 10 minutes later..I kept hearing this funny sounding "kitten sound" and went looking for the source.
Found the guy under his pickup, wrapped up in 100' of extension cord, wrapped up like a bug, wide clear spot in the dirt from where it spun him around and around and around, after it wrapped his hands around the drill.
The sqeeking noise was him trying to scream for help..but the cord had wrapped around his neck and he was having some trouble breathing....
Got out the wire cutters....
The thing was..Id told him on several occasions to NEVER use that particular drill. Ever. Never. He was fascinated by the 3/4" Jacobs on the end of it.....damned near killed him.
I eventually sold the drill to a professonal shop who put it into an in house made clamp on drilling rig for some field use.
I loved the drill..simply because it appealed to my "More Power! Huh HUH!" side...but..shrug..it was simply too damned dangerous to have aound a home shop
Never did find out who made it..data plate was missing. Well made though.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
That was my first thought. Gromit with that drill!
JB
Reply to
JB
So, how did it happen exactly?
I have hard times picturing the exact chain of events here, starting from when the drill became stuck.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3537
Or imagine what Don Martin would have done with it: "Fonebone's Hole Drilling Service".
Reply to
Tim Wescott
This sounds perfectly plausible... once upon a time the bit stuck, and at the very same instant the guy caught sight of a 2' centipede. Startled, his finger clenched the trigger instead of letting go. Then the drill started to rotate him like a will-it-blend test, and his panicked death grip caused him to become unified with his tool. Unfortunately he was using one of those popular 100' cords that allows one to neatly unravel every last coil before it pulls out of the socket. Thank goodness gummer the magnificent was there to save him, and they all lived happily ever after.
It happens that I have a similar story. A friend wanted to bore some big holes in his trailer. I handed him my fearsome wrist-busting 1/2" Makita, and warned him to keep clear of the side handle in case the bit snagged. About 30 seconds later it did, and he held on snapping the bit clean off. Dang, that doesn't sound very interesting, does it? So then I welded his hand to the trailer, and told him that if he ratted me out I'd drive 8 million miles to hunt him down and use his carcass to build a pinata filled with razor blades and acetone. Which I'd flail with barbed wire that was covered in the putrid hair of a cow that died of...
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
The guy was typically careless and as best as we can figure...he had the cord looped around his hand or his body and when the bit hung..it wrapped around his hands and then just kept winding once he was looped into it. He didnt dare let loose of it as it would bash his head in..and once his hands were tied (and he couldnt release the trigger)..the damned thing just kept on winding him and the cord up until it unplugged the extension cord. Had a two speed gear box on it and fortunately it was in Low..so was turning about 30-45 rpm best as I can recall.
Fortunately. At 200 rpm, the handles would simply have ripped his hand/arms off and beat him to death
He cant remember nearly anything that happened beyond hanging the drill bit and it happened FAST
Thank Crom he was under a really tall 4x4 so he didnt bust his skull on the running gear.
I warned him on a number of occasions..shrug. But he just had to use it.
One of those more balls than brains types.
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
Note how far from the center of the drill the handle with the trigger switch is. And note the screw-in handle bar with the cushion handle grip opposite it? *That* is what takes the torque -- with a big bit, ideally with a helper on the extra handle.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
And I thought that the 1948 US Electrical Tools 1/2 drill I bought the other day would be a poor choice to use for drilling joists in a house wiring project! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
This is a truly incredible story!
I find it difficult to believe, I am sorry to say.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3537
But you have to admit, hell of a story!
Reply to
cavelamb
Yep, extremely fascinating!
i
Reply to
Ignoramus3537
Shrug...happened. Sorry you have never run into one of those drills.
Glad I sold the damned thing.
Shrug
Gunner
One could not be a successful Leftwinger without realizing that, in contrast to the popular conception supported by newspapers and mothers of Leftwingers, a goodly number of Leftwingers are not only narrow-minded and dull, but also just stupid. Gunner Asch
Reply to
Gunner Asch
My first job was Electrician's Helper/Gofer. We had one of those and guess which drill motor the Helper/Gofer got to use to drill joists.
Damn thing would lift 200 pounds of me right off the ground when a 5/8 X 18" ship auger caught a knot- or worse, a nail, God forbid. (Lots of time resharpening the drill and listening to the boss ask me, loudly, what those "damn things" cost. After the second time, I bought one of them. That taught me more than all his yelling. And they're still expensive!:)
Reply to
John Husvar
It has nothing to do with the drill. You want readers to believe that the guy couldn't let off the switch, couldn't let go of the drill, and was using a 100' cord when he was what, 1' from the outlet? It's clear that you crank out these whoppers without giving their plausibility a second thought.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE

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