A blast from the past!


A complete scan of the October 1948 Popular Mechanics magazine:
Some metalworking articles, and a lot of ads for early tools. :)
Other issues listed here:
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
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I seem to remember reading a book about Tucker many years ago. Can't remember the details other than I wish he had survived as a firm.
Sure liked that steerable headlight idea though!
Wes
Reply to
Wes
In the San Diego Auto Museum they have one of Tucker's developmental engines on display. A very interesting piece of machinery with few parts, and needs very few tools. It used a hydraulic stystem for valve operation that was it's failing point, as they could not find a fluid that would work, until the Germans developed synthetics during the war. Too late for Tucker. The helicopter engine was too expensive and too small.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
these were an interesting car - I wonder how it compares overall to my 56 porsche - about the same age, both are rear engine - similar top speed too - my wretchedly underpowered 356 tops out just under 90 unless it's down hill with a tail wind.... but I can go LA to SF and drive around all weekend on a tank of gas (that's a ten gallon tank, by the way) so mileage is pretty good - no steerable headlight on my 356 though
Reply to
Bill Noble
I thought that the Tucker used Franklin engines. In fact, didn't Tucker actually buy Franklin to guarantee a source of engines?
Reply to
jbslocum
Yes, his engine wouldn't run for more than a few minutes before the hydraulic fluid foamed and the valves stopped working.
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Reply to
Stupendous Man
well, mine is a coupe - I bought it used in pretty sad shape about 1973, spiffed it up and have had it ever since - but it's now in a place where it's hard to get out so I haven't driven it since about 1994 or so - it's smooth and shiny but I need to put new tires on it and fix the fuel system - the gas in it congealed into basically napalm.... I guess I ought to put a photo on my web page some day (wbnoble.com) - I have photos of some other interesting cars of mine, but not that one (click on hobbies)
Reply to
Bill Noble
I saw a 356 C coupe under restoration at a body shop in San Carlos (San Francisco bay) friday, the thing had rusted badly and they replace the floors, a lot of the tunnel, the rockers, the lower door and fender sections. Way too much rust repair for a California car, it should have been crushed. I suppose the welds will make it stronger, but the thing will probably fold up in a collision.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
You may remember Pete Albrecht, who was a regular here until four or so years ago. Pete has two businesses, one of which is restoring 356s and making interior parts for them, including door panels and other parts that tend to deteriorate. He also does body panel restoration.
Apparently it's a pretty good business, although I haven't talked to him for a year or so to see how it's going.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
I can tell you from personal experience that the 356 has an amazing ability to go backwards at high speed - this can be a thrill if you are ready for it, but it can be a "seat darkening event" if you are unprepared
Reply to
Bill Noble
I dropped in on Pete a few years back and saw some of the replacement parts he was making-- very nice. Haven't talked to him in some time.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Really? I had no idea... :LOL:
I learned to drive in a 61 Corvair. And I do mean _learned_ to drive that car, in all directions. It's the exact same thrill as a 356 or a 911, or at least it was before Ralphie Nader used it to make himself famous by labelling it as 'Dangerous'.
It's only Dangerous if you lose track of which direction you originally wanted to go in, or let yourself run out of room for runout, or room to haul it back in and get around the corner...
Going lock to lock to lock hunting for equilibrium (especially when you have a utility trailer hitched on...) will wake you up REAL fast.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman

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