A Metalworking Term I never Knew Before

Today's "A Word a Day"* email was this one:
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This week's theme: eponyms (words coined after people's names).
Vulcanian (vul-KAY-nee-uhn) adjective
Relating to a volcanic eruption; volcanic.
Relating to metalworking.
The word is coined after Vulcan, the god of fire and metalworking in Roman mythology. Other terms derived from his name are volcano and vulcanization, the process of treating rubber with sulfur and heat to make it more durable.
**************************************************************** I sort of remembered Vulcan was the god of fire, but that metalworking part was news to me.
So, I guess we could call ourselves vulcanians. Sounds very much like something from Star Trek, doesn't it?
Jeff
* "A Word a Day" is an interesting site which offers free subscriptions that send you emails defining unusual words and describing their origins. I enjoy them:
http://wordsmith.org/awad/sub.html
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Jeffry Wisnia

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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 00:10:17 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

No no no, it is a neologism coined from Vulgar and Canadian -- a rather rare bird but not entirely unknown...
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I prefer the italian word for blacksmith "Ferrari"
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Leimkuhler says...

An erronious translation. The *real* one is "Ducati."
Jim
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jim rozen wrote:

That, my friend, translates to 'dollars'
cheers T.Alan
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"jim rozen" wrote: An erronious translation. The *real* one is "Ducati." ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ So, the, tell me what a desmodromic anvil would look like.
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Lichtman says... ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Don't know what it would look like, but I'm sure it would real expensive and built like a ship in a bottle!
Jim
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 00:10:17 -0400, Jeff Wisnia
...the process of treating rubber with sulfur and heat to

I remember seeing my dad patch tire inner tubes back in the early 60's. The patch was a thin metal "piece" with the patch on one side and a flammable material on the other. It was clamped over the hole with the patch side against the inner tube and the flamable material was ignited with a match. This adhered the patch to the tube and was called "vulcanizing". Randy
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"Randy Replogle" wrote: (clip) This adhered the patch to the tube and was called "vulcanizing". ^^^^^^^^^^^^ The process was "vulcanizing," but we called them "hot patches."
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Randy Replogle wrote:

I remeber those too, and I don't think they're around any more.
I also remember when tire blowouts were far more commonplace than they are now.
My dad's idea of heaven was a place where as you entered one of St. Peter's flunkeys handed you a set of four brand new "Goodyear Lifeguard" tires and tubes.
Those beasts had a second inner tube so that if the main one blew out the backup one kept you from swerving into oblivion.
Here's a radio commercial for them, probably from near the end or just after WWII:
http://www3.telus.net/public/xerog/goodyear.mp3
The references to "today's maximum speeds of 35 MPH" and "not rationed" sound like holdovers from WWII. IIRC petroleum supply wasn't the major reason for gas rationing then. Rather it was because we hadn't much of a synthetic rubber capability and the Japanese had occupied the places we got much of out natural rubber from. Rationing gas had the direct effect of reducing the number of tires needed for civilian autos.
Jeff
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Makes sense, sort of... Until you consider that both gas AND tires were rationed.
When she died, one of the many interesting tidbits that my grandmother was found to have collected over the years was a partially used up, clearly WWII-vintage booklet of ration tickets. Among the items I can remember it containing tickets for were sugar, nylons, gasoline, tires, coffee, and a box of .30-30 shells.
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Don Bruder wrote:

You could be correct, but I know the rubber part is true, you couldn't legally buy a new tire without begging the ration board for permission and giving them affidavits from not one, but two, repair shops that your old tire was irreparable. The used tire market went through the roof during WWII.
Here's a bit of nostalgia on the rubber tire part:
http://media.nara.gov/media/images/19/5/19-0402a.gif
And, "Straight Dope" concurs with my memories of those times:
http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a1_382b.html
Peace,
Jeff

All I've got left is my mom's little black change purse full of red and blue dime sized fibre tokens ("ration points"). Blue ones for butter and other stuff, red ones for meat.
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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On Mon, 17 Oct 2005 00:51:25 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

"Straight dope" forgot about the "T" stamp which were for commercial trucks. How do I know? My father had a bulk gas delivery dealership for a major oil company. We had mountains of those ration stamps piled on the table from the gas stations and farmers.
Unfortunately we burned the leftovers after WII.
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<snip>
Jeff,
You SOB, the last thing I need is to subscribe to another one of these things but this has not stopped me from subscribing to one more that you suggested.
To get even for this temptation, I shall tempt you with similar inbox clogging freebie subscriptions for the verbivore.
http://www.askoxford.com/contactus/wotd / http://register.yourdictionary.com/cgi-bin/register.cgi http://www.startsampling.com/sm/wod/register.iphtml http://www.wordorigins.org/newsltr.htm
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

My mother never saw the irony in her calling me that.....
<snipped>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

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In Birminghan, Alabama there is a huge iron statue of Vulcan which depicts him as an ironworker/blacksmith. Don Young

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