Absolutely MARVELOUS photos of shaper restoration!!

Yes, he did a fine job. What was the red colored compound he was smearing over the castings and then sanding down?
Garrett Fulton
"Gunner Asch" wrote in message
http://www.engravingartist.com/tour/shaper/index.html
Incredible work!
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 08:08:47 -0400, "Garrett"

It looks like lacquer-based scratch-filling putty, used in auto body painting prep.
If so, he has skin like a rhino. <g>
Ed Huntress

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On Sun, 12 May 2013 08:08:47 -0400, "Garrett"

Probably Bondo.

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He did a good job restoring a pretty useless machine.
i
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 16:23:40 -0500, Ignoramus5857

Useless? Blink blink....oh..thats right..you sell the stuff..you dont actually know how to use em.
If you find a shaper between 24"-36" in your travels...let me know. Ive got a buyer for one with a universal table. And he knows how to use it...ie...make money operating it.
Gunner
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OK, how do they make money with a shaper?
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Ig, Shapers produce edge profiles or grooves using both custom-ground tools and successions of 'standard' profiles (and sometimes, rarely, gangs of them). "Simple" tooling is flat, easily profiled on normal grinding equipment, and cheap to make. They are FAR less expensive shape-for- shape than custom-ground milling cutters would be.
Because the shapes cut are simple and linear, it makes more sense to tie up a shaper using very simple tooling, than to tie up a mill using custom-made cutters. The mill is best reserved for more complex work.
If a file would do the job to spec in the same time, why would you use a CNC mill (in a shop that needs it for more difficult tasks)?
LLoyd
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 18:37:22 -0500, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh"

but Iggy's point remains, Lloyd. I've been in hundreds of shops -- no exaggeration -- and I've seen exactly two that were using shapers for real commercial work. Both were being used for making mold bases. Shapers, like planers, have a small supposed advantage in that they impose less stress on a part by machining.
I say "supposed" because machine tool builders have actually measured it, and it appears to be mostly an old wive's tale.
Other than that, where are they using them for commercial machining? They're great hobby machines for the reasons you describe. But that doesn't translate to commercial viability.
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True, but a restoration to that level is a labor of love; I doubt it was done for economic or even practical reasons.
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And the restorer did an awesome job.
Ed made my point much better than I could ever say it. I think that shapers are so obsolete that most have been thrown out lng ago. I never even see them in old, grungy Chicago machine shops.
i
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 21:05:40 -0500, Ignoramus5857

Yet out here in California..in the aerospace shops..I occasionally will run across one. Funny that eh wot?
Gunner
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wrote:

I've been out of the business (except as a customer) for a while but most shops I see today often have one over in the back corner and most of the shops I was in, in my working life, had one.
As someone else wrote they can do a lot of jobs with limited tooling that the user can make himself. I've used them as a planer to produce a flat surface, cut gears on one, used them as a slotter to cut key seats, cut both male and female dovetails,and I can't remember what all else.
Hardly the first tool I'd buy but I certainly wouldn't turn one down if I had the space.
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On Sun, 12 May 2013 21:32:41 -0400, "ATP"

True enough. It was lovingly and beautifully done.
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They don't make much sense in a 'general machine shop' unless the shop has high production on a few parts. They're still used effectively in medium-run production shops. One of their nice features is that they're "set and forget" devices. Sort of like a programmable surface grinder, they just go 'til they're done, then stop.
They don't fill the niche they used to, because of the advent of so many CNC-controlled cutting methods available now, but they still have a place in factories.
I disagree with the (next) poster as to their usefulness for the hobby shop. It's a few square feet and several hundreds of pounds of wasted weight and floor space for a hobby shop. 3D CAD/CAM takes over for one- offs.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> fired this volley in

wait... that was you. I still disagree with their use in a hobby shop, if that shop has CNC.
Lloyd
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On 5/12/2013 6:22 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

I know of one specific place that uses shapers not mills - they have several, with long travels (30 feet) - the cutter travels on a bridge like affair - they make press brake dies with them - they have bins of blue curly swarf from the tool steel die material - very impressive machines
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That's not a shaper. That's a planer. Like shapers, there are a couple of tasks for which a few shops still use them. Until 50 years ago, machine tool bedways usually were cut with planers. Through the '50s and '60s, many of them were converted to milling machines ("planer-mills") and used for the same long-travel jobs that the planers were used for.
There are few of them left.
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Sounds more like a Planer, rather than a Shaper :-)
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Everyone keeps saying that! Doesn't anybody read the OPs anymore?
He said, "...they make press brake dies with them ".
Since press brake dies usually require some sort of grooved profile, and since the basic difference between 'planer' and 'shaper' is the shape of the blade and work -- shapers being relegated to grooves and edging, mostly...
BTW... one other common use for long-throw shapers over the years has been for hobbiests to convert them into manual milling machines. I've seen a number of them in service, mostly made from old Logans.
LLoyd
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