Another Quincy Compressor Question?

That's a damned shame. I never turn mine off. I have a couple very old nozzles I use, one on the mill, one on the lathe. They're the type that aren't OSHA approved, with no safety vents. I really like them, so I use them, and I'm the only one that has access to them aside from Susan. OSHA isn't a factor. As long as they are well lubed, and the insert is properly tightened, they don't leak. Even with my compressor set @ 175 PSI, it will often not start once a day, so I'm obviously not losing much air.
I rebuilt all my Milton connectors (something like 20 of them), replacing the steel valves with stainless ones that I made, and made new gaskets (which I also made), so they do not leak. I imagine it's nearly impossible to have an air system totally air tight, but yours sure sounds like it's pretty porous. Imagine if you ran higher pressure!
I have a manifold system and ball valves on my setup so I can blow down easily. It discharges outside, so there's no mess. It's one of the best things I've ever done for my air system because I now blow down daily, and it takes but a few seconds.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
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We used to have two taps at every drop, one would be 125 psi and the other regulated to 30 psi for blow guns. Each tap was a different style of connector so the people couldn't plug a blow gun into the High pressure. In those days there weren't safety blow guns. Somehow, we ended up with just the one style and of course, they are hard to find and expensive and there are well over 100 of them. Every six months or so, I try to get everybody to track down all the leaky fittings, We rebuild the fittings and make new rubber washers for them and it's better for a while. I do believe it would be cheaper to replace ALL the fittings with cheaper, more popular fittings, I'd say $600 P+L, than run 15 HP twice as long as I should have to, about 60 to 70% run time. I'll have to do the math and see when the pay-back is. But, I certainly love my Quincys!!! I wish I had other no-brainers.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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Yep! Of all the machinery I've ever owned, I can't think of one other that has been so reliable and trouble free. They truly are a nice piece of equipment. Here, in timber country, the skidders are pretty much all equipped with one of the 10 horse heads. If you've ever seen how such equipment is used, you'd likely understand that a piece of junk wouldn't last a day.
Mine has the old type oil pump, which apparently had given some trouble. I know that's one of the things they changed with later models. I've never had the slightest problem even with that.
I have a distinct advantage as compared to you. Regardless of the quality of employees, once you have a herd of people using equipment, things have a way of degrading. I'm not surprised you have so much leakage, and I'm not implying that it's intentional. When you're the only person using the service, it's immediately apparent when there's the slightest problem and you can deal with it.
I'm not convinced new fittings would solve the problem. Have you given any thought to changing the nature of the seals? Maybe something softer, so it takes less effort for them to seat? Also, are your lines iron? Rusty? I violated all the rules and installed 1/2" PVC pipe after experiencing rusty iron pipe, but before you jump to conclusions, understand that virtually 100% of them are cast in concrete, where they can't explode violently. The system has worked beautifully so far, to which I attribute my dry air. Any oil could change that in a hurry. I realize you can't use PVC, but getting away from iron is a great idea, assuming you're using it. Had I not been placing my pipe in concrete, I'd have used copper. I explored the ABS air lines but realized that I'd have to rob a couple banks to afford it. Nice stuff, but very pricey.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
I love: "herd" of people, on SO many levels. At least there are drip legs with valves and filters and oilers EVERYWHERE but the lines are all 3/4" black pipe. I may tirade about anything other than black pipe but the next leg we do will be in copper! Quick math: 40 amps, 9600 watts, 9.6kw/hr $.15/kwh = $1.44/hr $1.44/hr * 70% duty= $1.008/hr cost for air. Lets say I'm wasting $.40/hr. $600 = 1500 hours payback. Compressors run 2000 hrs/yr. Leaks cost $800/yr. Math sound fair if not conservative?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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Yeah, I was pretty proud of that one as it came from my fingers, too. Sure is appropriate for most scenarios.
I've yet to see the joints leak when soldered, and it's faster and easier than cutting threads. It's really a nice way to go, assuming you can secure the quick connects such that they don't move about. It requires very rigid terminations, but that's not difficult to accomplish. I faced the same thing with my plastic pipe, which transitions to a short steel nipple in either a tee or ell, also cast in concrete. My connects are totally supported and rigid.
Quick math: 40 amps, 9600 watts, 9.6kw/hr
Gasp! And I whined when they raised our rates from .$0033 to $.0044/ kwh?
Yeah, the math looks fine to me, but then what the hell do I know?
It would be real good to get the leaks under control. It's more involved than just the money, too. Think of the extended life of the compressors. Keep us informed, and good luck!
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

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