Anyone know where to buy semi-silvered glass?

Christopher Tidy writes:

You must mean spanners. Edmund Optics, Thorlabs for some pricey ones. Ebay for a budget type.
Often the rings are hardly tight, and can be turned out with the tip of a tiny screwdriver on one side, or the filed-down tips of needlenose pliers on both sides. Give it a try.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

What's the official name for these spanners?

I'm reluctant to try it. I don't want to cause any damage.
Many thanks,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy writes:

Spanner wrench or adjustable spanner wrench. The first fixed type is a thin hollow tube with tiny projections on the end to fit the holes or slots in the retaining ring. This is better at deeply recessed locations. The second is the adjustable gadget with interchangeable tips.
See: http://www.thorlabs.com/advSearch.cfm and search for "spanner".
See: http://www.edmundoptics.com/ and search likewise.

Really, just nudge it with a jeweler's screwdriver or dental pick and see if it doesn't back right out.
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    O.K. Looking under Edmund Scientific, I did not find them last night, but looking under Edmund Optics tonight, I find them. Try:
    <http://www.edmundoptics.com/onlinecatalog/displayproduct.cfm?productID57&search=1>
complete with a link to download the (one-page) manual in PDF format.

    Indeed so. Or make a special spanner as I described in the article which I just posted.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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| Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564

Try searching for 1/2 aluminised glass. Might yield better results.
Steve R.
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Reply address munged to bugger up spammers



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wrote:

I have several long, narrow pieces from junk xerographic copy machines. I don't know what function they played. They probably would not help your situation. I think they are about 1/4 inch thick, 1/2 inch wide, on the silvered side, and probably 12 inches long.
Paul
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snipped-for-privacy@coinet.com wrote:

Thanks for the offer, but the thickest glass which will fit in the frame is 1/64" thick.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Did you check Edmund Scientific - the Optics catalog? They have optical quality lenses and mirrors.
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

Maybe they can send you the replacement mirror. Bob
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How about a reflective ND filter? Edmond Scientific has them. I think I might have some laying around. Send me an email at t miller @ u maryland . edu. (remove the spaces)
Tom

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Tom M wrote:
<snip>

Thanks for the offer, but I discovered that the design is intended to use plain glass. I called a few glass suppliers and couldn't find a piece the right size. In the end I found another identical microscope on eBay cheap. It has a few issues but with the pair I'm sure I can build a working microscope.
Nevertheless, thanks very much for the offer.
Best wishes,
Chris
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On Thu, 21 Feb 2008 10:11:57 -0800 (PST), Christopher Tidy
I had a microscope with a ~45 deg semisilvered mirror that needed replacement, tried a standard mirror but turned out it was a "cold mirror" and removed IR from the lightpath to save IR from the users eyes (multicoated so IR passes straight through). Be good idea to find out the original specification....!? C+

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Charlie+ wrote:

The best that will be possible is to look at an original reflector. To the best of my knowledge, W. Watson & Sons are no longer in business.
Best wishes,
Chris
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In the end I tracked down another Watson "Standard Metallurgical" microscope on eBay. It's in better condition, but still has a few issues. With spare parts from the first I should now be able to build a microscope in good working order.
For the benefit of anyone who comes across this thread in the future, the reflector in the Watson "Standard Metallurgical" is plain glass, not a semi-silvered mirror.
Many thanks,
Chris
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On Wed, 05 Mar 2008 23:48:29 +0000, Christopher Tidy
Plain glass transmits IR through (greenhouse effect) - so I think your 45 plain glass is doing exactly what a proper cold mirror does - its probably much cheaper but loses more of the visible reflected light on the way together with all the IR, the function is the same - to avoid permanent damage to the viewers retina, especially if on a production line with halogen lamp sources etc...... standard mirrors reflect IR and surface coated mirrors also reflect the UV components as well as IR, so a cold mirror has to be multicoated to get rid of the UV as well as pass through the IR. Various informed guesses here! Charlie+

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