Anyone own a Senaca Falls Lathe?

I was just given a very old Seneca Falls lathe 10" with 3 and 4 jaw chucks,
collets, and set of change gears. Looks to be a good machine. I think its a
tad heavier than my 9" south bend. Any input would be great.
Thanks
Reply to
Wayne
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Wayne,
I've had a 10" Seneca Falls lathe for several years now. The vintage is late 1910s. I've pretty much gone through every inch of the thing while refurbishing it. If you have any questions, please let me know - I may be able to help.
Dave Robinson
robinda-at-quincy.edu
Reply to
Dave Robinson
"Wayne" makowicki
wrt Seneca Falls lathe
Try here first:
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Yes, some here still have and run these. The older form would be the Star lathe, and newer might be the Gem. A catalog shows up occasionally (was one on ebay almost currently). The mechanics should be straightforward for an older change-gear engine lathe. Frank Morrison
Reply to
Fdmorrison
Input about what? You need to ask a question, first. :^)
OK, I'll start off: does it look anything like mine?
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
At this point I don't have any specific questions, I might just sell it. I spent some time cleaning it today and put it together. It does look like yours. The taper is different than my SB so I am less likely to keep it. Look here I will post pictures
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Reply to
Wayne
Nice machine, a bit newer than mine. The differences are:
Yours has a micrometer dial on the crossfeed, mine never had that.
Yours has a compound, mine does not.
Sombebody fitted the back gear guards to yours, a nice feature.
I had changed the oilers on mine to be a wick-feed type, with larger brass reserovirs. I copied my Pratt & Whitney bench lathe for that.
Your headstock has the same kind of split bronze inserts that mined does - when I got it, the bearing caps were just finger tight and there were no shims or anything in it. I cut shims to allow the caps to be snugged down while getting the right bearing clearance.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
Boy, you really make out like a bandit down there. Just a little ways north I've only seen two working lathes in the last five years, and neither were for sale.
GTO(John)
Reply to
GTO69RA4
This lathe uses a split bearing? it seems to run very smooth with no drag. My other lathes when hand spun don't coast, but this lathe does.
Reply to
Wayne
Undo the two big screws on one of the caps, to see the shells.
Save any shim that falls out and put it back in exactly the same spot.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
I had an old one that came off a US Navy submarine after WWII. Great little machine. I did gunsmithing with it for 15 years. It was belt driven & had a big control lever. It was a 9" I think but had riser blecks to make it 11" swing on the head stock & tailstock. Was pretty accurate for a light lathe. Greg Sefton
Reply to
Bray Haven

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