Bridgeport -- transportation and putting it on casters

I have a few questions, A few related to transportation of this mill and a few related to moving it around.
TRANSPORTATION.
SNIP
I wanted to hear some practical experiences with moving mills around, esp. from people who had them fall, to know why they fell.~
i XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX Hey Iggy,
I see Marty Escarcega just popped in to RCM earlier this morning to tell us about a 15" drill press on Ebay. Drop him a line direct about moving the B'port, as he has had both good, and sadly, bad times doing exactly what you want. The sad efforts were available on the web at one time..........
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
ps....... I'm about 6'2 again ( I gained an inch with the new knees) and found that I wanted to have my B'port a bit "higher" than they are made. So, I sat it on two PT 6X6", one parallel to the table at the front and similar at the back. Then I filled in the side holes that were left, not for support, but to keep anything from getting under the base that didn't belong there. I have not needed to move it since, but my plan was to just slide out the two side pieces shove in the pallet jack if I need to.
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On Apr 14, 9:25 pm, Ignoramus18706 <ignoramus18...@NOSPAM. 18706.invalid> wrote:

Igor having just gone through the adventure of aquiring a mill and having had the heart attack at the age of 27 of having it SHIFT on the truck and needing to RESTRAP it at the side of the road I'll share some stories.
I moved the mill 480 miles its an index 45 not a bridgey but its a turret mill and essentially the same basic design ram on both sides of the column is a balanced point to lift it and the ram on both sides of the column SIDEWAYS is a forklift point per the seller.
the Mill was lifted on using a boom truck with a sling on the table and head side.
then we strapped it and backed it up against a pallet at the end of the bed of the truck (Mill resting on bedliner)
then the knee got cranked down onto a block of wood to take the stress off the screws
then strapping the mill was strapped donw to the truck fromt he fornt and back corners and off i went the truck andled way differently and it felt like the ballance was different
THEY are top heavy
I lost a year of my life when i was starting at a light and making a left and the mill SHIFTED to the right making the turn
while pulling over i turned the truck right sharp enough to right itthen added 4 more cross corner straps in the truck bed on the table
the machine dint really get jostled but i NEVER EVER EVER EVER EVER want to see 2800 pounds of load in the bed of a truck shift.
The rest of the trip was fine but if there is a rule the POSTED OFFRAMP SPEED IS THE ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM and nothing else happened
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I'd practice a bit with it before going for broke.
The mast on a lift can be of two types. One one kind, the mast starts growing as soon as you lift the forks. Not so good if you are inside where there is low overhead. The other kind has what is called 'full free lift' where you have to get to the top of the mast before it starts extending. Likely much better for what you are doing.
Have a light touch on the controls. Down can be very fast if you have a load and pull too far. Have a spotter to watch you. A lot of things are going to be going on, there are blind spots, and this is new to you.
There should be an operators manual with the lift truck. It would be a very good idea to read it.
Wes
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Igor,
I've just noticed something interesting. In your pictures, the operator's manual appears to be for a later machine. Look at the picture on the front cover and then at the mill: the two are different. So if you get your weights from that manual, they might not be quite correct.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

I don't have the headroom in my shop to weigh my almost identical Bridgeport with my crane scale, but my 3,000# rated forklift doesn't even flinch lifting it. Previously I've handled it with a 2T engine hoist out at the 2,000# boom extension without issues.
Pete C.
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I actually have a Dillon dynamometer scale that goes up to 2,500 lbs. I could possibly weigh it.
I am still reading everyone's comments, but I want to say that I welded on an eye for the rear tiedown to the tailgate. I already have four tiedown points on the sides, but I did not have a rear tying point.
I have five 2" wide nylon ratcheting tiedowns and will use them.
i
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Ignoramus18842 wrote:

I have the 5,000# version, I just don't have the headroom in the shop to get it rigged above the Bridgeport to lift it and weigh it.

Good, with something that heavy and particularly top heavy you want it well secured. Be sure to stop at the end of the driveway on your way out of wherever you're picking it up and tighten all the straps. Do it again after a few miles and you should be good from there.
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On Apr 14, 6:25 pm, Ignoramus18706 <ignoramus18...@NOSPAM. 18706.invalid> wrote:

Hi Iggy. Congratulations on your mill.
When we were moving new Bridgeports in Chicago we handled a lot of trades, and while the machines with the round overarm weren't everyone's favorites, we always had a waiting list of people to buy or lease (actually, "rent") them.
That's a very neat idea for a moveable machine. As far as supporting the machine properly, I'll offer the following: Of the (thousands) of mills I've seen, I'd venture most are not sitting flat on the floor for the simple reason most companies don't have a perfectly flat floor. Not having a flat floor, and trying to keep the mill from rocking, people shim the corners. Some owners (especially for larger machines) will just opt for a leveling pad for each corner during installation. Almost no one tries to shim (and support) the entire base perimeter. What would make ME shy away from the mobile brackets would be my very limited welding abilities, because, as you know, the machine is cast material and you need to weld (braze?) to steel; not an easy proposition, if I remember correctly, although I'm sure many on thiis group have the necessary skills.
When picking the machine under the overarm I'd suggest using a 2x4 on the fork toward the front of the machine and a 1x4 on the fork at the rear. This will help compensate for the greater deflection of the front fork and allow the machine to remain more level, YFTMV (Your Fork Truck May Vary). Using the same logic one should position the more load bearing fork toward the center of the forklift and the least load bearing fork toward the outside; this allows both load chains on the forklift to bear equal loads.
It might be a good idea to tack some 2x4s around the base on your trailer as, if I remember correctly, your chains aren't the best. I don't remember seeing a hole in the round overarm but I might have forgotten it's being there, but if there is one DON'T use it for anything besides lifting the RAM ONLY. When unloading lift the mill (with the wood in place) and have your forks adjusted so they are level _with the load applied_. Make sure you have clearance beneath the mill, pull the trailer out from beneath the mill, and lower the mill straight down; this method is always the safest. The round overarm mills will want to swing to and fro so take this into account when traveling.
Check out that mover. I'M pretty sure neither the State of Illinois or Cook County are in business to certify machinery movers. This sounds like a phoney. If this mover is legitimate he will supply you with a current "Evidence of Insurance" from his insurance agent. Make sure public liability and workers compensation are covered as well as coverage for your machine. Try to get a list of satisfied customers. Don't allow anyone to move your machinery without the proper insurance. (<That's a "period")
Good luck with your machine guy, you lucked-out.
dennis in nca
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And goes a very long way towards keeping the bitch from sliding on the forks as well
Gunner
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. Lazarus Long
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I think you may have missed the fact that the base isn't welded to the machine, the base is angle iron welded into a square then the machine is set into the base. What looks like welding to the machine is in fact just painted Bondo to fill the joint and keep the chips out.
Roger
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And a fine job of Bondoing it is too. Thanks.
dennis in nca
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thanks.
For this trip, I will not use chains, at least not much, I will use 2" tiedowns and one ton rated 2" slings.

Well, he's been on the mover list for this auction company, for ages. I may have a wrong idea about what his credentials are. I will definitely ask for insurance etc.

Thanks. At the price of about $800, I think that I have some wiggle room for mistakes. It functions on a very basic level, meaning that it is not flat out broken, though I have not measured any quality parameters.
i
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Ignoramus18842 writes:

The *only* thing that counts is an ORIGINAL WRITTEN CERTIFICATE OF INSURANCE for GENERAL LIABILITY (and perhaps vehicle liability and workers comp if applicable) from the insurance agency issued to YOUR NAME covering ALL DATES of the work and providing for WRITTEN NOTICE TO YOU if the policy is cancelled. Verbal assurances, copies of policy documents, phone calls to the agent, a photocopy of a certificate issued to someone else, etc., are all WORTHLESS and SUSPECT.
Written certificates from the agency to each customer are a normal part of hazardous businesses, so if you get any hesistation when you ask for one, be very suspicious.
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Too_Many_Tools wrote:

I expect if you have a rigger moving several hundred $K worth of machine everything will be by the book, forklifting a lowly Bridgeport onto a trailer, highly unlikely.
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On 15 Apr 2007 23:08:13 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"

You are asking to be made an Additional Named Insured, and the last time I talked to Ye Olde Boss about it that costs $75 for each named entity, takes a week to arrange (faxed isn't good enough for some, they want the original paper in their hands), and good for 6 months or the next renewal period.
We had a mall that wouldn't let me up on the roof to remove a DBS Satellite Dish and a TV Yagi antenna from a closed Radio Shack without bumping our liability insurance from $2M to $5M and having 5 named entities (the mall, three corporate owners, and the management company) added to the insurance.
For a huge job where you are exposed to big losses and want iron- clad proof that it's covered that can be a reasonable requirement, but for a lone one-shot hour or two job, fuhgeddaboudit. Unless you want to pay for it, that ain't gonna happen.
We had to say no thank you, go find someone who is already paying the insurance for that mall. And don't be surprised when they charge you triple our normal rate - they know they've got a captive audience.
--<< Bruce >>--
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On Apr 16, 8:15 am, Bruce L. Bergman

Our insurance agents would always provide proof of insurance without charge. I've never had anyone complain about money when delivering the same to me. The only difficulty we'd ever encountered was getting these on time, as many insurance companies seemed to take forever. Start early.
dennis in nca
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Bruce L. Bergman writes:

No, just a certificate of insurance.
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I see you have already gotten lots of input. Here's mine:
1. If this is the mill that you are going to sell anyway, why not just have the new owner come and get it from its current location?
2. I use a farm tractor to move my stuff onto and off of trailers. The only time I have had to have help is with a 3500 pound surface grinder and I hired a local contractor who had a big skid steer loader for that one.
3. Moving it around/casters: Most of the machies that I own have 3/4 inch diameter holes for base mounting. So, I tap them 7/8-9 and I have a set of long, threaded-all-the-way bolts that I screw into the holes. I can easily raise anything with those 4 bolts and then put rollers (1 1/2" water pipe) under the machine. With those, I can push or bar the machine to anyplace I want it. I haven't bolted my mill down, but I let it down on pads under each corner.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------
Ignoramus18706 wrote:

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I pick my machines up with a 10,000 pound endless nylon sling that is made for the purpose. My tractor has a 5" slip hook welded to a piece of 4" pipe that I place on a 1 1/4" rod in the area between the front loader lift arms. The sling is great for not allowing any metal to metal contact. I use cloth or aluminum shims at pressure points.
Pete Stanaitis -------------------
Ignoramus18706 wrote:

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I'll add a few things to all the good advice:
Clamp all locks firmly, with a wrench. This keeps things from moving, and also prevents loss of clamp handles.
Extend the quill enough so the fragile spindle splineshaft is protected from being bent.
As for putting a mill on casters, I wouldn't do it. Mills are already pretty tippy. If one mounts the mill on a dolly with casters, the tippiness can be solved, but then one will always be tripping over that damn dolly.
It's easy to move a mill ten feet by the Egyptian Method: jacking it up with a pinch bar and inserting some 1" diameter solid mild steel rollers underneath, and walking the mill to its new home, and reversing the process. People use black iron pipe, but I've heard of pipe collapsing. Solid rod is cheap, available, and sure. A handful of shims cut from 0.25" plate is also useful.
Joe Gwinn

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