Bridgeport -- transportation and putting it on casters

I guess I already seconded this roller suggestion, but just in case its not clear, you need to understand how simple, controllable and effective
it is. You need 3 pieces of round whatever, each at least several inches longer than the machine is wide. I use 1 1/2" pipe because a) I have it, and b) the bigger the diameter, the easier it is to make the machine move. Anyway, you put 2 of your pieces of pipe under your jacked up machine, at about 1/3 and 2/3 of the distance from front to back. Lower the machine onto the rollers. Then you put the third roller under the edge of the machine in the direction you want to go and push or bar the machine in that direction, making sure that the machine starts to mount that third roller. Now you roll carefully in that direction until your first roller comes out from under the machine, move that to the front, etc.. think about balance and making sure there are always two rollers under the machine. Plan ahead. Now for the really neat parts: To turn the machine, just put the loose roller under a corner of the machine at an angle, (the direction you want the machine to go) and when the machine rolls up onto it, it goes the way that roller is angled. Works like a dream! Also, theoretically at least, each roller is touching the machine and the floor at only two points, you can often use your bar to skid the machine a little bit in the desired direction. Have some small pieces of aluminum sheet so your bar isn't digging into the floor when you crank on it.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------------
Joseph Gwinn wrote:

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I really have to +1 this. I still help out at my old Voc school (17 or so years later) and we have moved the whole class shop around using this method. That's 7 Bridgeports, 9 Lathes (Clausing and Nardini), grinders, bandsaw, EVERYTHING. Even jockeyed the SuperMax CNC lathe into position that way. Works a treat. As with everything (and already stated many times), go slow, plan ahead, and be careful.
Best,
Weyland
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Weyland wrote:

I moved a 10,000# 40' cargo container over rough terrain using about the same method. Used about a half dozen logs 10' x 6" dia, some chains and a Highlift mechanical jack both to lift the container and to pull it.
Pete C.
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Very nice description Pete. Another idea would be to have the person feeding the rollers not wear gloves which can easily get trapped beneath a roller; there are few common things which will crush a finger so rapidly.
When we rolled Bridgeports into place we'd only use 2 rollers with one person both pushing and balancing (this takes some practice) at the balance point of the machine, and the second person moving the roller from rear to front (there are two ways to do this). I don't suggest this for the average person and mention it only if you happen to be stuck with only 2 rollers.
As far as roller types we always used 1" bar on this size machine unless there was a problem with the floor surface. Black pipe will also work for weights far beyond a Bridgeport as long as it's fully supported.
dennis in nca
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Joseph Gwinn wrote:

All you really need to move the mill is some nylon skid plates under the machine and a come along. Pull it only at the base or it will tip. A strap around the base or a chain in a rubber hose to protect the paint will work fine. I move our machines around the shop using that method but I also put steel flat stock under the nylon skid plates and add a little oil to decrease friction a little because most of our machines are over 20,000 lbs.
John
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Make sure the swing ring inside the mill is not cracked or broken... I almost droped my mill because the ring was broke and the top part of the mill came off when lifting with the fork-lift truck.... Putting casters on is easy by running heavy angle-iorn across the top of the holes ... Use long all threaded grade 8 3/4" bolts ... Casters get mounted on the bottom of the angle... Put the bolts up through the four holes and run nuts down on them... Slide one angle iron with two casters over onto the 3/4" bolts and run a second nut down on each bolt... This will lift the mill up onto the wheels... Now do the second set...After you move the mill you can remove the four nuts and the casters come off and you wont have anything to trip over... It only take about 10 min. to put the caster on and take them off...
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I like it, simple yet elegant. Too bad I didn't know about this 2 weeks ago. I wouldn't bother now, but will keep it in mind.
Wayne D.
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Iggy,
How dare you post something On Topic. What is Nick going to think ;)
Wes
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Probably he thinks that my on topic posts were forged and not genuinely posted by me:)
i
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On Sun, 15 Apr 2007 20:29:08 -0500, Ignoramus18842

Silly question: Anyone here done it with air bearings?
You need a really flat concrete floor, but most contractors can manage that - or you have a crew come in after the fact with the Terrazzo Grinders and they can make it flat and smooth - just watched them remodel an old building for a BevMo, they ground the old slab flat and waxed it.
Put a big sheet of plate steel under the Bridgie, with a few holes at the machine feet for the leveling screws, and an air fitting in the middle. Turn on the air and it magically levitates a 32nd or two, and it's less tippy than casters or a pallet jack...
Don't raise the drawbridge, lower the river. ;-)
--<< Bruce >>--
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Fantastic idea. Air bolsters if I have the term right have been around for years in press operations.
Wes
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