Bridgeport -- transportation and putting it on casters

I expect if you have a rigger moving several hundred $K worth of machine everything will be by the book, forklifting a lowly Bridgeport onto a trailer, highly unlikely.
Reply to
Pete C.
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I think hardened (hopefully) and ground is about the best any of those machines will get. Certainly the lower end models don't appear to even get that. The higher end stuff like the full sized Bridgeport clones that Grizzly sells are likely scraped properly or at least semi properly, but HF doesn't carry those.
Reply to
Pete C.
Fantastic idea. Air bolsters if I have the term right have been around for years in press operations.
Wes
Reply to
clutch
You are asking to be made an Additional Named Insured, and the last time I talked to Ye Olde Boss about it that costs $75 for each named entity, takes a week to arrange (faxed isn't good enough for some, they want the original paper in their hands), and good for 6 months or the next renewal period.
We had a mall that wouldn't let me up on the roof to remove a DBS Satellite Dish and a TV Yagi antenna from a closed Radio Shack without bumping our liability insurance from $2M to $5M and having 5 named entities (the mall, three corporate owners, and the management company) added to the insurance.
For a huge job where you are exposed to big losses and want iron- clad proof that it's covered that can be a reasonable requirement, but for a lone one-shot hour or two job, fuhgeddaboudit. Unless you want to pay for it, that ain't gonna happen.
We had to say no thank you, go find someone who is already paying the insurance for that mall. And don't be surprised when they charge you triple our normal rate - they know they've got a captive audience.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Our insurance agents would always provide proof of insurance without charge. I've never had anyone complain about money when delivering the same to me. The only difficulty we'd ever encountered was getting these on time, as many insurance companies seemed to take forever. Start early.
dennis in nca
Reply to
rigger
I like it, simple yet elegant. Too bad I didn't know about this 2 weeks ago. I wouldn't bother now, but will keep it in mind.
Wayne D.
Reply to
Wayne
No, just a certificate of insurance.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
You're mistaken. I have these two in my shop and their dovetail ways are certainly hand-scraped:
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Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Optical measurement
cylindrical square
Granite square
for starters
no wonder it took you so long.
A dial indicator,and a surface plate will give you all the measurements you need to determine flatness and establish the amount of wear on each way.
How good do you think a level is? The best ones I've seen are +- .0002 in 15 inches. You got to hold the surfaces better than that if you want to hold .0001 . A dial indicator will read flatness a lot better than that. A .0001 dial will be as good as your granite surface plate.
When is the last time you saw a machinist have two of each sized mike in his toolbox and using both on the same measurement. You use one that has been calibrated with a known history and check it with a B grade standard on the shop floor.
So if you get two different readings which one do you throw out?
The final pass/fail test is a crosscheck on all the work done. Each step is checked as it is done by one set of calibrated instruments that have a calibration history that shows no continual out of calibration conditions. Also, if required you could recheck the instruments after the measurements are done to recertify that the instruments are performing properly. Every new machine shipped or installed of any quality comes with a final inspection sheet with the measured and guaranteed minimum accuracy listed. Squareness of the ways for instance is measured by cutting a square block and checking the squareness of the block.
I would suggest that you rather check the mike against a NIST traceable standard and not rely on the calipers since they aren't good for any quantitative measurement with a tol. of less than .002 in most cases, especially with larger dimensions.
John
Reply to
john
You must be assuming that you have a surface plate large enough to envelop the work, so you can take the work to the gage. Most of us don't have that luxury, and have to use gages we can lift at arms length; we take the gage to the work. In which case, you gotta have other means to gage angles and coplanarity than a reference surface and height gage.
See Connelly. He's very fond of levels.
When I've invested hours in a part, I'm checking the last few cuts with confidence-increasing techniques like redundant measurements with redundant instruments. But then I'm not infallible, and the devil of entropy hovers over my left shoulder, with his friend distraction on the right.
Both. Check your instruments and try again.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
I'll take a closer look at them on my next HF visit.
Reply to
Pete C.

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