fa: atlas and south bend milling attachment for 10/12 inch lathe

totally blatant shill for an ebay auction of something that is auctally
directly relevant to the interests of this group - no subtelty at all - no
hidden agenda, just bid the price of this puppy through the ceiling so I can
buy a small country and retire.
here's the link
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Reply to
William Noble
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The pics on ebay are of the work holding side ? Ya think this will fit my 10" Logan ? Might save me buying a mill until I actually have room for one ... -- Snag
Reply to
Terry Coombs
if its for an atlas then there will be a spot for a bolt to go through it to a T-slot on the compound
if your logan uses a tslot on the compound as well (likely) just make or purchase a T-nut to fit
Reply to
Brent
Thanks , kinda what I thought . If the 20% off coupon for Horrible Fright hadn't been bogus , I'd be awaiting delivery of a Big Red Mill in a couple of weeks and this would be moot . As it is , I think I will watch this auction . I can't afford enough to buy a small country , but might manage this item if it doesn't get too spendy . -- Snag
Reply to
Terry Coombs
the bottom of this has a hole, 1.5 inches in diameter, that on an Atlas fits over the projection to which the compound is mounted. On SB, there is an adapter in that hole that projects downward into the hole in the cross slide into which the compound mounts. If your Logan is like my (12 inch) Logan, then you could use it by making an adapter plate that fit into the 1.5 inch hole and had a properly sized hole (3/8? I dont' remember exactly) for the pin that centers the compound and a pair of holes for the bolts that hold the compound. I made a plate like this to mount a holdrige tool to my lahte (because I had one that was for a bigger lathe and I couldn't get it low enough if I left the compound in place)
I would not try to mount it on top of the compound, I think there will be way too much vibration, but mounted on the cross slide will be fine
Reply to
William Noble
NO NO NO NO NO you don't mount this to the compound - you remove the compound and mount it to the cross slide. it has it's own "compound" in the base. It does NOT NOT NOT mount with T-nuts. It attaches to the fitting that the compound rotates on.
see my prior post answering the Query re Logan lathes.
Reply to
William Noble
As for using the milling attachment instead of a mill, the thing is often difficult to set up but, with some ingenuity, you can do a lot with it. I have one on my SB 10L and I used it quite a bit when I was doing more in the shop.
I've also owned a knee mill and of course there is no comparison in what they can do. But you may be surprised at how much you *can* do with one of these gadgets -- and a faceplate on your lathe. Learning to use a faceplate well is probably more useful, overall, than a small milling attachment.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
All been rendered moot for now . I've been outbid ... but will keep watching it . I can make the adapter if the price doesn't get too high . Since I can't have what I really want (knee mill) right now due mostly to no where to put one , I'm seeking other avenues . I have a couple of small projects in mind that this unit would do easily ... I'll be watching . -- Snag
Reply to
Terry Coombs
OOPS not like my palmgren then although i bet i could and SHOULD set the palmgren up that way too as i think about it
thanks for pointitng that out
Reply to
Brent
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Actually -- no. The compound is removed and this mounts in place of the compound. On an Atlas lathe, it fits over a dovetailed stud on which the compound rotates. On a SouthBend, the affixing is somewhat different, thus the need for the adaptor which he mentioned making (in the auction).
The compound is removed for at least two reasons:
1) Increased rigidity with the milling attachment mounted directly to the cross-slide.
2) More vertical travel is possible than with the compound in place, since the top of the compound is only an inch or so below the centerline of the spindle, which is where the end mill will be mounted.
Nope. For an Atlas, just slip it over the stud and tighten the setscrews to close the angled clamps (which he also mentioned making) to lock it in place. (BTW, I would suggest bronze or brass for the clamp.)
For the South Bend, you turn a piece which fits into the hole which the projection of the compound fits, and turn the upper part into a dovetail matching what the compound of the Atlas would have. To be honest, I'm not sure *how* the compound of a Logan fits to the cross-slide, but since Snag has one, he should be able to determine that.
My Clausing has the hole similar to that mentioned for the SouthBend, with a circular T-slot surrounding it for the heads of the bolts which clamp the compound to the cross-slide.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
My compound mounts on a stud (hole? can't recall , but makes a minimal difference) with two bolts in circular T-slots . Sounds like the mount would be fairly easy to make . I'd still rather have room for a real mill ... alright , alright , I'll quit whining now . -- Snag I was in the checkout at Lathemaster a while ago , ready to drop some serious cash . Something told me not to do it , but to wait . The Karma Bank owes me ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
My Sheldon 11x44 (Marketing name) and I have one. It fits nicely on once I remove the compound.
I designed a holder that locked into the jaws that was a ball end turner. The milling attachment allowed nice height and angle rotation as needed. I used a boring head and made my own boring bar with a 90 degree triangle. I got the straight shaft milling head mandrill and provided beautiful bronze bushings. A hand wheel was attached to the opposite end for ease of turning the cutter on the shaft turning in the spindle.
Engineman1 and I started a club some years ago and the pages still exist :-)
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Martin (former oldtree for the redwoods we lived within.)
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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William Noble wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
"> My compound mounts on a stud (hole? can't recall , but makes a minimal
your compound mounts on a stud that is about 3/8 inch (maybe 5/16?) to keep it centered, and the two bolts (really T bolts) are in a circular T slot - if you do remove the compound BE SURE YOU DO NOT HAVE THE BOLTS AT 6:00 and 12:00 (e.g. in line with the cross slide direction of travel) - or you will be unhappy - (yes, I learned that the hard way).
Reply to
William Noble
You really want one?
Let me check my Stacks O Stuff if you dont win the auction.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Where are you located?
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
The Atlas clamps are, I believe, steel - at least mine are. Brass or bronze sound good at first blush, but I'd stay away from them for two reasons.
One: the clamping pieces project out from the compound or milling base until they bear against the dovetail. They are well supported in the base, as they are (or should be) a good fit in the holes there, and you want them pretty stiff before they contact the dovetail.
Two, and more important: while you don't want the clamping pieces to wear the dovetail appreciably, you also don't want them to mushroom at all. If the contact areas deform, they won't retract into the base - and you'll have quite a time getting the base off the dovetail.
Mine are, as I said, steel. They are ground to match the angle of the dovetail, and appear to be hardened.
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin
The Atlas clamps are, I believe, steel - at least mine are. Brass or bronze sound good at first blush, but I'd stay away from them for two reasons.
One: the clamping pieces project out from the compound or milling base until they bear against the dovetail. They are well supported in the base, as they are (or should be) a good fit in the holes there, and you want them pretty stiff before they contact the dovetail.
Two, and more important: while you don't want the clamping pieces to wear the dovetail appreciably, you also don't want them to mushroom at all. If the contact areas deform, they won't retract into the base - and you'll have quite a time getting the base off the dovetail.
Mine are, as I said, steel. They are ground to match the angle of the dovetail, and appear to be hardened.
John Martin
I agree with John, above - I noted in the auction that the angled clamps are steel - before I put up the auction, I had written the text saying "brass', but then I took it apart and looked and the ones that are holding the clamping part are steel, so presumably the base should be the same, for the reasons suggested.
Reply to
William Noble
I'm in Memphis Tn . Soon , going to be in Mountain View Arkansas , I hope . The impending move is the only reason I don't enlarge my workspace here . -- Snag , jus' gettin' by with an 8X12 shed ...
Reply to
Terry Coombs
If you mean the milling attachment , yes , I'd like one . Within it's limits , it can do many of the small projects I need done . Let me know , my reply-to address is correct . -- Snag
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Well..Arky is road trip! Closer than Mempis Gunner
Reply to
Gunner

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