flux-core with no gas nozzle?

I've got a microscopic amount of experience with MIG, and zero with
fluxcore, so bear with me here:
What happens if you weld fluxcore, and don't have the gas nozzle on
the welder?
I'll be repairing a bracket on my truck soon, and it'll be hard to get
at. In my tiny MIG experience, the single hardest problem I had was
clearly seeing the spark and the puddle; working under my truck's
dashboard I'll need all the help I can get.
I've never done fluxcore at all; every picture I've seen of fluxcore
in use -- including rigs that can't be converted to gas -- has shown a
gas nozzle just like for MIG around the contact tip. It isn't clear
to me why this should be necessary -- since the shielding comes from
the flux, it seems like it ought to work just fine to take the nozzle
off, and get a better view of the work. This is with a cold torch,
obviously.
So... commnts?
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
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Under truck dashboard, I'd be reaching for the _good_ epoxy (and/or some sheet metal screws and some extra sheet metal), not the welder. Between frying engine computer (if not a very old truck) and access and fire hazards...
Reply to
Ecnerwal
Good thoughts... but I am convinced that the welder is the right answer. It's really more behind the dash, up under the cowl, and it's a bracket that bears quite a bit of force (Toyota used an unbelievably stupid -- unless you've come across other instances of their "engineering" -- bracket design for the clutch and brake pedals). I've got a jury-rig involving a 7/16" threaded rod through the cowl that is probably stronger than their design, but mating that with the original mount would be better than either.
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
It is very common to run fluxcore with no nozzle whatever.
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Works just fine without the gas nozzle. Splatters up the threads something fierce though.
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
Thanks to you and Grant. Exactly what I wanted to know (umm, threads? the nozzles I've seen have been pushed on over o-rings?)
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
Whatever. Fluxcore needs no nozzle but (as Gunner sez) it'll splatter up whatever might otherwise have been protected by a gas nozzle.
It doesn't take much protection to avoid that. Shrink tube will work for a little while, has for me. Duct tape might also work, haven't tried that because shrink tube worked for me.
Mind the sparks and glowing slag drops from fluxcore when working under-dash. Exciting experience is quite likely if you don't.
Reply to
Don Foreman
Not necessary for the shielding gas (as there is none coming out of it), but helps in avoiding short circuits.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Lincoln supplies a screw-on cover for the MIG gun tip for flux-core work. It protects the threads on the gas diffuser.
It's Part Number M16418-R, IIRC, for the Weld-Pak 155.
Perhaps the other manufacturers have similar parts?
Reply to
John Husvar
Thanks!
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
"Joe Pfeiffer" wrote: (clip) What happens if you weld fluxcore, and don't have the gas nozzle on the welder? (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ The copper wireguide protrudes through the nozzle, so removing the nozzle should have no effect, except:
You will be working in crowded conditions, where, as you say, it may be difficult to see. Be extra careful not to let the copper end touch anything. I can't remember for sure, but I think I've done this.
BTW, since you say you're not used to using fluxcore--be sure to reverse the polarity on your torch.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Thanks for the reminder
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
Not a whole lot of experience welding but LOTS of experience putting out fires in vehicles, some from welding. Have your fire extinguisher handy, an easy way to get the heck out, and a phone nearby outside, so you can call me if things go south! Oh yeah, not in the garage, please...
Reply to
Charles Struble
While we are in reminder mode... It may be worth wasting some thin sheet and half a pound of wire on practice. The Fluxcore wire behaves quite a bit differently from conventional wire and may take you by surprise if you assume that the settings you know will work for it.
regards Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Not just that, get a second person watching! BTDT. No severe damage. Since then, we strictly practiced that procedure, despite being young and stupid.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Lots of good reminders here, for which I thank you. The rig belongs to a neighbor, who will want to watch the show in any case!
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
*Definitely* going to be following that one.
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
But not watch you welding, but looking in places where you can't see what's going on! *That's* his task and he clearly has to be aware of it. Remind him that it is *his* car going up in smoke.
Just a reminder. You know that, he doesn't.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
The gas lens doesn't work like a Mig or Tig setup. It does, however, help contain the shielding gas around the puddle, which helps weld quality somewhat, and protects the copper nose of the torch from shorting to the work. JR Dweller in the cellar
Joe Pfeiffer wrote:
Reply to
JR North
Drape everything you can in damp cotton duck dropcloths or wool blankets. And wrap all the cables in the immediate area under the dashboard, too. You want to use wool or fiberglass "Welders Protective Pads/Blankets" held in place with spring clips over anything that can get damaged. Give your 'Safety Man' a garden hose with a trigger nozzle or a full garden sprayer with clean water in it, and the nozzle set for heavy cone spray. And a charged dry-chem or CO2 fire extinguisher or two close at hand if it turns out the water isn't enough.
The water sprayer will be used to lightly dampen all the exposed surfaces each time right before you start to weld, and put out the fire in the carpet (and your coveralls) from flying red-hot slag dingleberries - without all the cleanup issues blowing off a Dry Chemical extinguisher inside the car would cause.
(Not to mention the "Unplanned Change of Underwear" after he blasts you in the face with Ammonium Phosphate powder.)
Long time ago I had a shop putting a new collector and muffler on my Corvair, and when he picked up the Hot Wrench that little voice of reason in my head said to get the garden hose and stand by as Safety Man. And I have learned that when that little voice speaks, it's usually right.
The shop owner openly criticized my doing this - Famous Last Words: "What could go wrong?" with the "You're just a kid, what do you know?" addendum for good measure. Then he flipped his hood down and got to work cutting out the old collector.
Not thirty seconds later he lit off the firewall insulation with the backwash from the torch, and I was right there with the hose...
After that, he wasn't laughing any more.
When they ask "What could go wrong?", tell them the Top Ten Things that could go wrong. It either shuts them up right quick, or it clarifies you're working with someone who is too careless to be entrusted with your safety and/or property.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman

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