Forge blower repairs

I started today by sleeving the worn end section of the fan shaft . Some here may recall I was asking about helical gears . Well , I'm not sure how
much wear is actually on this gear , but we ain't replacing it . It is an integrally machined part of the fan shaft , so there's no way to replace it without replacing the shaft - and that part ain't available . ANYway , the end of the shaft that carries the thrust bearing - a ball in the end of the shaft - was worn , nominal is .500" and it was under .450" , so I machined it down to just over .4375 and pressed/loctited (red) a .625" OD/.4375" ID sleeve over it . The fan end is worn about .010 under , I'm not sure yet what I'm going to do with it . Probably clean it up with the minimum amount removed , then make a new bushing and sleeve the fan itself . The rest of the blower seems to be in pretty good shape aside from worn keyways . Those will probably get cleaned up and have new oversize keys fitted . The only restriction placed on this project is that he doesn't want the original patina disturbed . He wants it left rusty on the outside . Works for me ... I don't think he plans on using this much , but a hand cranked forge blower could come in handy ...
--
Snag



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I recently discovered the snowthrower impeller shaft bearing, a compact and inexpensive self-aligning bronze bushing that could be useful for repairs or cobbling up machinery from scrap. http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/401046624476?ul_noapp=true&chn=ps&lpid
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Interesting ... but hard to use in this application . I've been out in the shop making a new shaft for the hand crank . The shaft runs in the cast housing and is badly worn . The new shaft is a tad larger in diameter , I have reamed the housing to clean up the holes and fit the shaft to it . I'll turn the crank end down to fit the crank and bore the gear out approx. .030" to get a very light press fit so the keyway won't wear too much . Which reminds me , I need to order an 1/8" end mill , the only ones I have on hand are ball end .
--
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I spent the morning fitting an oilite bushing and close-fitting pivot pin in the worn traction control handgrip of my newly acquired 1995 snowthrower.
Is there a preferred way to repair and perhaps improve a worn control shaft pivot in outdoor equipment? This thing had a few Nyliner flanged bushings which disintegrated but mostly mild steel shafts running in punched holes in sheet metal, with little hope of lubrication. Since the holes tend to wear oval they can't always be drilled larger without moving. In this case the handgrip was small enough to clamp and bore in the mill and the snap clip on the pivot pin will retain the bushing if it loosens.
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Tack weld a (thick) washer with the proper size hole on both sides of the worn hole . For the flanged nycrap , I usually machine one of bronze/brass and glue it in with JB . I was just out in the shop boring the new fan shaft bushing about .030" too big on the lathe ... but that's OK , I changed my mind about my choice of bushing material , decided to use the last bit of Ampco45 al/bronze instead of mild steel . Original was CI , and if I had a chunk that's what the new one would be too . I'm trying to decide how I want to mill the key slot in the new input shaft . I can use the mill to either slot it with a slitting saw or mill with an EM . The other option is to chuck it in the lathe with the quill locked and machine it with the Dremel using that same end mill . Either end mill option will require cutting one direction only and withdrawing the cutter to return due to cutter deflection . The saw option has the advantages of not only no side deflection , but it's the most rigid . Drawback is fixturing it on the mill .
--
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Woodruff key cutters are nice for milling slots between clamps or on short projections from the edge of the vise. I make the key fit the slot rather than vice versa since key stock easier to clamp and mill, or throw away and start over. I haven't had a problem with stepped keys connecting different-width slots, transmitting up to 5HP. http://www.use-enco.com/1/3/keo-woodruff-key-seat
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

I ordered 10 1/8" end mills a couple of days ago . The easiest way to do this is to get the vise back on the mill and use an end mill from above . The slitting saw is a .125 , which is why I considered it - but it's 3" in diameter which will have me slotting further than I need . I also have to match the keyway in the gear .
--
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Why do you think you have to match the two keyways?
http://eccarburetors.com/store/en/billet-aluminum-flywheel/flywheel-keys/flywheel-offset-key.html
-jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

Well , I know I don't HAVE to ... but it's easier if I do .
--
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