Gingerly getting into manufacturing

But my solution is BETTER! The electric company says that a projection welder takes a huge slurp of power but only for a fraction of a second. The billable KWH are almost nill and they would charge 20K to run a new line and a monthly minimum.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
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ichudov AT gmail DOT com
very interested
Reply to
Ignoramus1274
I seem to recall that there were such welders that delivered the pulse from a large capacitor, thus smoothing out the surges.
A motor generator set with large flywheel could also help.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Yea, there are ways to do it with a welder...but look at the link for the swaging process...it's pretty cool.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Gunner on Tue, 01 Jan 2013 17:35:10 -0800 typed
It's abit "cluttered" for my taste. Knowing me, I'd start out clearing "my" workspace. But I'd also start filling up the unused space with "important" stuff, and eventually it would be back to "cluttered" - but with _my_ stuff. Which is Important, unlike the Junk which used to be there.
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
The pix are more than 10 years old. I hate clutter and had abolished it when I bought the rest of the stock. Today, most of the products I make weren't even designed ten years ago. We had to retool just about everything.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I did look, and yes it's pretty cool. Spot welds take less space and are probably stronger, but the swaged pegs would work well for many things.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Tom Gardner on Thu, 03 Jan 2013 02:39:22 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalwork>> Gunner on Tue, 01 Jan 2013 17:35:10 -0800 typed
[snip]
I too, hate clutter - which is any pile of stuff I don't know why it is there. But it is "amazing" how many people will mistake my stack of important stuff (or "stuff to be gotten to Real Soon Now") for clutter. B-) OTOH, one of the oldest Bossims I recall is "If you haven't time to put it away properly, what makes you think you will have time to look for it later?"
tschus pyotr
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
That's why you leave it in a nice little pile. So you don't have to LOOK for it! :)
A clean shop means you don't have enough paying work.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
It even makes sense to have "piles" *IF* you have a one-man shop. I have two engineers and a mechanic in the mix. So, we have a place for everything and everything in it's place. But there is still multiple projects going on that consume common space and get in the way.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I too would prefer a big-assed projection welder. I do have a spot welder that we use for sandwiching .62-.42-.62 parts for knot wheels.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
You don''t have a one man shop:
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As the pictures of Ohio Brush show you have "piles" everywhere:
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"So, we have a place for everything and everything in it's place."
The photos of Ohio Brush don't lie but you do. In fact, you lie on a frequent basis.
Reply to
Jonathan Banquer
That's why I plan on building a 40' long workbench along the back of my shop after the new roof goes up. 36" deep Butcher block style, made from old pallets, and in 8' long sections. I'll need lots of all-thread to hold them tight while the glue dries. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
There was a company, "Builders Square" that closed all it's stores many years ago and I bought truck-loads of 2' and 4' pallet racking. Most of it we used as is bat some we cut into 3' high sections then made table tops from 2x4's and ply and covered the ply with Formica to make nice work center benches. Quite a few have assembly jigs and fixtures bolted on and tool balancers overhead. One of the best policies we have for projects is that first you get a plastic bid that will hold everything for the project THEN start work. If you have to wait for parts, everything goes in the bin and keep the bench clear. As I added more and more people, this helped a lot to improve efficiency...and tool hunting time!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
uff I don't know why
Above is yet another one of Tom Gardner's many fairy tales / lies that he loves to tell.
Here is the reality of how "efficient" Tom Gardner's Ohio Bush shop actually is:
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Reply to
Jonathan Banquer
I remember BS shutting down. I ought several large breaker boxes & other stuff from their Orlando store.
The idea behind the long bench is to leave sections set up for similr jobs. No looking for tools at all, and parts that are only used for that job are already in cabinets on the bench. By makeing it one single long bench,. I can adjust the space for each area, if needed. The other benches are mostly 8' long, and some space goes to waste or becomes a catch-all.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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