HF 2 Ton hoist

Purely FYI - I bought the 46766 foldable shop crane at the local HF store this past week and assembled it. For only $159.99, I am very
impressed. It folds pretty easily (putting a block and lever under the frame to take the load off the legs when folding makes it way easier). At any rate, seems really nice if anyone else is looking.
I also bought the 05402 two ton load leveller. It seemed good but the chain was not anything I'd trust. I bought some 5/16" grade 70 chain and used my die grinder to open the cross-catch on the leveler just a hair (as little as I could) to hold the heavier chain. I could have used grade 43 but I've heard one too many chain breaking stories. For $24.99, it looks like a good rig other than the chain.
At any rate, just wanted to pass the info on. The hoist was especially nice and for $159.99, I continue to be stunned at what they sell for such a low price. I know a bunch of people will raise issue with the long-term quality, but I bought it for home and this thing will only see use a few times a year.
--George
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I bought one of the cheap load levelers at Northern Hydraulics here locally. I would imagine they're all from the same slave labor camp in China. They work okay, but be sure and grease the threaded shaft. I was in a hurry to get a heavy GM diesel V8 pulled out of a pickup and didn't lube that shaft. The surface started to flake and plug up threaded leveler brackets. Not very good steel but would have probably been fine if I'd taken the time to lube it before I started the job.
Garrett Fulton
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Wow. Good point. I didn't think of that. We've been swinging around the little Toyota engines for the last two days. I'm guessing they weigh 4-500 pounds. I'll be sure to lube the shaft with some lithium or moly grease.
--George
On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 08:55:02 -0400, "Garrett Fulton"

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I have a similar crane - great things to have in the shop and don't take much space when folded. Try making one for the price - even with scrap steel I couldn't do it. Mine has moved all my gear in the workshop, including some heavy machinery. Geoff
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I have one too - $169 from local Costco, came with load leveler - which I then fitted with an 8-ton long-throw air over hydraulic jack. Now I just hook up an air line and phuh-duh-duh-duh up she goes, no more jacking! (Of course, it still works to jack it manually!) Only problem I have is when I lower the legs it takes 2 guys to get it levered up so the legs can go fully down, or maybe I just haven't yet figured out how to do it. I really like the new folding hoists, though. - GWE
geoff m wrote:

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Mine is that way too. For some reason the wheels in the middle are too small to take the load off the long legs. I'm guessing they tried to keep the load on just the four main heavy casters and not the little ones used when folded. I just keep a stack of three 2x4's I nailed together as a fulcrum and a 4' 2x4 as a lever and lift.
On Wed, 09 Jun 2004 10:20:57 -0700, Grant Erwin

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thanks for the info Simon Shabtai Evan
George wrote:

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Mine is good too. The only downside, besides the difficulty unloading the legs for folding, is the pump stroke. Takes ALOT of pumping to get it extended. JR Dweller in the cellar
George wrote:

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J R North writes:

I keep an 8-inch length of 1/2" PVC pipe with the regular handle. Raises the ram quickly when unloaded.
Agreed, for the money this is a great tool to have.
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Just recently a picked up a used one (welded/bolt together) for $35 and slapped a quick coat of paint on it. Can't believe I waited this long--very handy. Might need some new casters but boy is it useful.
GTO(John)
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On 10 Jun 2004 00:45:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GTO69RA4) wrote:

One of my Secret Sources offered me a Carolina 4000 lb "engine hoist" today, for $100.
Is it worth it? The critter has seen some serious use, but nothing is bent or twisted and the castors are not bent or damaged.
Are these better than the HF stuff?
Gunner
"A vote for Kerry is a de facto vote for bin Laden." Strider
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Gunner wrote:

Nah...terrbile stuff...you should avoid it like the plague. Now, where did you say that hoist was located? :)
Tim
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Dunno Gunner. If it isn't bent and the ram isn't leaking, it seems like a good deal. The things just go and go and go. At 4000 punds, you've got a hell of a lot of capacity. My HF can do 4000 too, but the mast is way back to it's shortest length to do it. The hole units weighs around 250 pounds to give you an idea of the amount of steel in it.
Offer them $75 because it needs paint :-)
--G--

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I tried that..sigh..no go. I had to pay the full $100.
But he did toss in a Wilton #3 vise as a consolation prize. Seen better days and is a bright orange..but it will clean up ok.
I picked up the cherry picker and had it in the front of my lil 4x8 utility trailer for a couple days, and was in a shop Friday finishing up a hot job, when the owner asked me if I wanted a small turret lathe. Kitamura, uses 4C collets, no cross slide included (damnit). Thing ran fine but was an orphan and in their way.
So I used the cherry picker while still in the trailer to lift the lathe into the trailer and then rolled the whole thingy to the proper places. Then when I got home last night, did the same thing in reverse.
Ive REALLY got to do something about those little caster wheels though..they dig into the dirt something awful and then dont roll worth a damn.
Seems that the cherry picker/engine hoist will be doing some work for me around here much easier than before, when I only had a fixed H frame and an Apex railroad jack
Gunner

That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.         - George Orwell
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Hey Gunner,
Just a comment on a comment you made:
wrote: SNIP

//////////////////////////////////// Assuming you meant that you were trying to move the hoist with a decent "load", you've got to be really careful to keep all four wheels on a solid smooth level surface. Anything that allows the frame to get even slightly loaded on only one leg, or that "swings" the load sideways at all, can cause rapid catastrophic failure. Like solid-tired fork-lifts, they are not ATV's or made for any sort of "rough terrain", or swinging loads.
I think Marty had an experience few years back that would emphasis this point.
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
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Just to echo Brian's comment Gunner, a lot of crane manuals expressly tell you not to move the crane under load. I've always been told to move a crane as little as possible and with the mast as low as possible. I've worked with some very heavily made cranes in the past that I think could have rolled down the road without a problem (!), but using my HF as an example, while it is of medium build at best and foldable, I could see it have serious issues if something shifted.
--George
wrote:

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wrote:

Indeed. When I move something over even slightly uneven ground, I keep the load just over ground level and move everything slow..very slow. Only on hard surfaces do I let a load dangle free. I will often secure a hanging load so it is unable to swing in the slightest...changing CGs are not for those faint of heart.
Ive always been EXTEMELY careful of how a load moves, as I worked in the oil fields for many years and moved really really heavy stuff...like blowout preventers and pipe. The incident where my hoist actually mechanicly failed and dropped the pantograph last year gave me even more caution.
What started out as a hobby, scrounging Stuff for my own shop, has taken on a life of its own and is turning into a business (and its not as much fun..though tis starting to pay some bills actually). Unfortunately, Im not equipped nor do I have the land or facilities to do much more. Seems every time I make a big inroad into the Stuff in the back yard...I fill it even fuller within a month. At the moment, sitting in my trailer, is a Crystal Lake od grinder than a fellow in Colorado bought from a guy in Bakersfield (and a hell of a deal too) and asked me to store for him until he gets out here to California "sometime this year", so yesterday I had to drive over to Bakersfield, and load it up, and bring it home. Now Im trying to figure out where to put Stuff. The gun drill is still sitting under the H frame and the Roper Whitney punches are still in the way, along with the 13x36 Colchester and the 6 IBM punch card cabinets, the two air compressors under repair, and those pallets of Stuff from the diaper factory.
And Ive still not moved the 15x48 Clausing into the shop yet ( I have to spin it 180 degrees) , or moved out the Lorch. And its all been done by manual labor, rollers, a very tired pallet jack and what used to be a strong back.
Sigh..
Gunner
That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.         - George Orwell
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Gunner wrote

Gunner, since some of your activity is outside, and you're always acquiring machines, what about building a trailer similar to what gas companies use to move large horizontal propane tanks? A hoist rail down the upper middle, along with removeable lower support beams, would let you go to a machine, straddle it, pick it up, lower it onto the beams once in place, transport it, then lower it into place at your site, all without jacking, dollies, or prying. A chain hoist and a rail trolley would be able to travel the length of the transporter to adjust balance of the load and tongue weight on the truck hitch. I've been thinking of building something similar for years, but the old 'round tuit' just hasn't got here yet. It would also be good for hauling somewhat long pieces of steel, power poles, wood beams, and such.
RJ
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wrote:

Thats actually a very good idea, and Ive toyed with it. The problems are they are heavy, I only have a small truck, and they are not particularly universal..hard to carry a bunch of plywood or cord wood for example. My biggest need at the moment is a pneumatic tired Small forklift, 2500lb capacity max. It would make life much easier. But unfortunately..I cant seem to scounge one up.
Gunner
That rifle hanging on the wall of the working-class flat or labourer's cottage is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.         - George Orwell
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Yeah, ground use forklifts are in pretty high demand. I'm restoring a 3,000 lb Datsun unit here that I bought from a close friend for $600, after his business took off and he needed a bigger better lift. Even after boring the engine and installing new lift chains, along with a general blasting, painting, brakes, rewiring, and new forks, I'm gonna come out for a max of $1,800 or so. For the quality of refurbished lift I'll end up with, along with the usage I'll get out of it, I'll be well pleased. Besides, it's been a very interesting project. In case anyone else needs lift (leaf) chains, the best prices I found were from Maryland Metrics on the Web at $5.89 a foot, compared to as much as $18 a foot elsewhere.
RJ
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