How do you attach a 3-jaw chuck to a mill's table?

Hi,
So how do you prefer to attach a plain-back, 6-inch, 3-jaw chuck to your mill's table with three T-slots?
Appreciate any wisdom offered.
PaulS
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http://www.micro-machine-shop.com/clamping_kit.jpg
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Well, geez! If you want to do it the asy way. LOL.
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On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 12:47:30 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Ayup..that works too.
Gunner
"The best government is a benevolent tyranny tempered by an occasional assassination." --Voltaire
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mill's table with three T-slots?

How does somebody who has a "clue" do it, or how do "I" do it?
Do you mean to just bolt the chuck down to use it as a round stock vise?
I like to make things that I can repeat. I might cut some flat stock with an alignment key I can place in the t-slots of the table, then flip it over and mill it flat. Then cut a deep pocket in the "center" to use for future zeroing. Then cut a shallower snug slip fit pocket in the plate to set the chuck down into. Clamp, bolt, season to taste from there.
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wrote:

-I like to make things that I can repeat.
In this case you can align the table, chuck and spindle very easily by clamping an edge finder in both a mill collet and the chuck and moving the chuck until the split edges align, or don't catch a fingernail slid across in either direction. That's how I set my rotary table to 0,0.
It works on a lathe too. jsw
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On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 13:33:13 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

How about drilling and doweling whatever you use as a mounting flange? Pressfit in the flange, smooth slide into the table.
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How about making an oversized back plate. On it - have dog holes for the table. And naturally the mounting holes for the chuck.
This way there isn't a rotation on a screw shaft.
Martin
On 10/9/2012 9:27 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

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On 10/9/2012 12:47 PM, Bob La Londe wrote:

YES!
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Paul C. Schiller wrote:

I have a backplate about 8" in diameter on the back of my 6 1/4" chuck and just clamp it to the BP table with a couple of common clamping bars with a bit of Al in between to stop marring of the upper surface. The back of the backplate also has a removable spigot that locates in the centre of my 10" rotary table and the back plate has 6 holes spaced around it to allow it to be held down with T nuts and cap head screws in the rotary table slots.
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On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 09:40:31 -0700 (PDT), "Paul C. Schiller"

Mine sits on a 1/2" Al plate which gets clamped to wherever by the usual clamps.
Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC
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On 10/9/2012 10:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How is the chuck mounted to the AL plate?
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Three bolts through recessed holes in the plate.
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On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 12:40:31 PM UTC-4, Paul C. Schiller wrote:

Hi,
Clamps on the chuck face ,or a custom size backplate to clamp onto. Thanks for the ideas. A backplate was the way I was leaning, as clamps could interfere with what I'll want to hold.
BTW, The below link is what peaked my interest in other ideas. It's an IMTS show highlight video from Hurco, I have no connection with Hurco.
At about 2:15 into it, you can clearly see two 3-jaw chucks mounted to a mill table, but I can't for the life of me see how the heck they are held down. Can you?
http://www.hurco.com/en-us/about-hurco/promotions/Pages/IMTS-2012.aspx?utm_source=Forward&utm_campaign=IMTS_recap
Sorry for the long link.
Thanks again, PaulS
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    [ ... ]

table, but I can't for the life of me see how the heck they are held down. Can you?

http://www.hurco.com/en-us/about-hurco/promotions/Pages/IMTS-2012.aspx?utm_source=Forward&utm_campaign=IMTS_recap
    Hmm ... it might be a removable T-slotted plate with the chucks bolted in place from the back.
    Or -- it might be a flat backplate attached to two T-nuts (they both seem to be centered over slots), and the chuck then bolted down to the plates using through screws accessible from the front, as is common for adjust-tru style chucks.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

If you want to be clever and mysterious you could thread a center-drilled plug with the spindle thread and drop it over a tee slot bolt. It might shift under a heavy cut.
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    Unless you are careful to set up so the cutting forces would tighten rather than loosen -- which would require a left-hand-cut endmill in most cases -- unless you were milling out a cylindrical pocket on center in the end of the workpiece. :-) Maybe even a square or rectangular pocket as long as it is centered over the axis of the chuck.
    The real question is: "Why try to be mysterious if it makes the task harder?" :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Hi Guys,
I can't see any sub plates or added backplates in the video, they might be there though.
Might also be through-bolted from the top. But can you really do that with a scroll chuck?
Anyway, I've not seen/heard anything that makes much sense to me yet.
A mystery indeed.
Asking Hurco (even if you could reach someone with the answer) just feels like defeat.
Machinists are supposed to be a bright bunch. I should be able to figure this out.
Could it be a plug that expands in the chuck's bore as you tighten a bolt through it into a tee-nut in the table's slot?
Plug's hight in the bore would have to be below the plane of the jaw slots. On my 6" 3-jaw that's about 1.25" of meat in the bore to grip.
Scratching my head on this one still...
PaulS
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If the chuck has front mounting holes the tee-slot mounting plate could be hidden beneath it.
My suggestion of a screw-in washer was facetious since it wouldn't hold very well, but it could be practical with more work. Machine a tongue on one end of the threaded plug that fits the tee slot and drill the chuck backplate spigot radially for a screw that locks it to the plug. Secure the plug to the table with a centered tee slot bolt and nut. The tongue and locking screw keep the chuck from unscrewing.
jsw
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e there though.

with a scroll chuck?

els like defeat.

this out.

through it into a tee-nut in the table's slot?

s. On my 6" 3-jaw that's about 1.25" of meat in the bore to grip.

I use lathe chucks on a rotary table, table has a large hole in the center extending past the T-slots. I just made a replica spindle nose, slotted the bottom for a bar that fits the T-slot and use a bolt through the center of the spindle nose clone to clamp the bar to the table. I can spin any chuck I want onto the table, with or without workpiece from lathe operations.
Stan
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