Mechanical Aptitude Test


Found this site on RMH, posted here for
your enjoyment:
formatting link

Look for the review button to see your
test results.
Phil Kangas
Reply to
Phil Kangas
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Interesting, thanks. I got an 82%, most of which were gear issues, half of which were due to over-confidence on simple ones (my achilles heal).
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
kinda amusing - I got 92% - at least once I hit the wrong answer and hit submit just as my brain said "that's wrong" -
I wonder if the test results correlate with anything
Reply to
William Noble
Cool quiz. I got an 88%. I don't do the gear stuff that often, I think it was the Lego mechanisms class I taught this summer that drilled them into my head.
Reply to
woodworker88
Well, I got a 90%, (also got messed up on worm gears) but I think there's room to quibble on two others.
#15 presumes a frictionless pulley - I live in the real world and know that a straight lift with no pulley requires the least force.
#31 has no correct answer stated. The correct answer is 60 since the actual mechanical ratio for the lever is 5:1.
I had the same problems with poorly written questions in college. My professors did not seem amused...
Carla
Reply to
Carla Fong
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 21:41:54 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "Jon Danniken" quickly quoth:
I got the gears but missed some of the pulleys, then I misread the balloon/atmosphere question. 84% here.
P.S: Did you find any of that polyester lead yet?
-- History is often stranger than fiction. Fiction has to be plausible. History is what happens when people don't follow the script. --pete flip, RCM
Reply to
Larry Jaques
I got 92%, fiddling around. It was not a bad test overall. It did have some ambiguous questions.
Reply to
John Husvar
94% here (also messed up the worm gears)
And also #24, which they describe as a parallel circuit. Sure, the two lamps are in parallel -- but they're in series with the switch...
Reply to
Doug Miller
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) fired this volley in news:Vn1Si.3045$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr17.news.prodigy.net:
I thought just a moment about that, then considered that the switch and power are ALWAYS in series when supplying a load.... the nature of a circuit is expressed concerning the load arrangement, not the power source.
One question I found ambiguous, because two answers are true to some degree was the one about the normally aspirated engine. Yes, atmospheric pressure pushes the air charge in, but it wouldn't push it in unless "suction" (lowered pressure) were created by the piston moving down.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
94% kind of fun.....
Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
Reply to
Randy
I think they got that one wrong as well. They seem to be assuming the center of mass of the two boxes is out at their far edges (that gives their answer, anyway).
I'd also quibble with 44 -- you have to know a bit more about what's going on downstream before you can predict what's going to happen in tube B. If the tube ends at the edge of the picture, you could get a vacuum in tube B...
There are some more where I got their answer, but I think other answers are equally valid: I got their answer for 48, but "suction" is just as good an answer for a mechanical aptitude test (it would be wrong in a physics test). Likewise for 49, what do they mean by "easiest"? Again, I got their answer, but I note diesel can be ignited with no spark at all.
Course not -- we know what the questions mean, you should read our minds! (I am a professor, and I'm joking)
Note -- I got 92. Missed the worm drive, two of the pulley questions had similar enough pictures that I thought I'd mis-clicked and missed one as a result, and the two quibbles above.
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
The load is parallel.
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
I got just under a failing grade, and found the test to be crappy. As already pointed out, some of the questions were ambiguous, and there weren't a lot that applied to real world situations, but more to theory.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
Switches are not considered as part of the circuit for series/parallel determination.
Jim Chandler
Reply to
Jim Chandler
I agree, Lloyd. I also had a question about the pressure differential in the venturi setup. I think tube A would have some height in it while tube B would be evacuated. I also question the direction of rotation on the worm gear.
Jim Chandler
Reply to
Jim Chandler
The people who write tests dont deal in real world situations, its all academic to them. They get paid the same weather thier right or wrong.
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
azotic
And your score, Tom?
Reply to
cavelamb himself
I missed the hydraulic pressure one with the venturi and two columns. Also #18, but i disagree with the result, as there seems to be no mechanical advantage or reduction in the diagram.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
I did too; I thought they'd made a mistake. After the third look at it, though, I decided the answer given is correct.
Reply to
Doug Miller
100%. But the boxes on the see-saw question didn't have the correct choice available, so I chose the only one that seemed to fit...
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand

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