Mechanical Aptitude Test

96%, wish I could back up and review answers before 'handing it in'.

Wes

Reply to
Wes
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You say tomato and I say tomahto.

Jeff

Reply to
Jeff Wisnia

On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 22:14:47 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, Don Foreman quickly quoth:

anything and gravity

nothing to do with it,

eliminated in other ways, such

I missed that one, too, and I'm a retired auto mechanic. Grrr. It may be "atmospheric pressure" at zero to 1 RPM, but is sure isn't at 8,500 RPM. I'll second "pressure differential", too.

The theoretical obstetricians (I would have said "mathematicians" but, due to the large, pregnant pauses after we found out our answers were wrong in their eyes) have some explaining to do for their ambiguity.

-- History is often stranger than fiction. Fiction has to be plausible. History is what happens when people don't follow the script. --pete flip, RCM

Reply to
Larry Jaques

I believe the correct term is "signal".

Reply to
cavelamb himself

It does?

I think that your apparent absolute statement may have exceptions.

Reply to
Dave Hinz

Not exactly. "Normally aspirated" means having an atmospheric pressure intake, which does not imply carbureted, but it definitely does exclude turbocharged and supercharged engines.

All turbocharged and supercharged engines are fuel injected. Some normally aspirated engines are fuel injected. All carbureted engines are normally aspirated.

Reply to
Doug Miller

Indeed. It does what it does regardless of terminology you or I may use to describe it.

Don W0LAP

Reply to
Don Foreman

Nope.

I have a turbocharged engine with 4 carburetors (which are somewhat modified fro the usual in order to work properly under pressure, but which are carburetors, not fuel injectors).

Reply to
Ecnerwal

Agreed. So neither choice was technically correct, while either response indicates that the respondent understands howitworks.

I recall a description of the operation of a 4-cycle engine as "suck, squeeze, pop, phooey" It omits a few thermodynamic details and perhaps isn't achingly accurate, but it is certainly descriptive!

Reply to
Don Foreman

I got a 96%. Missed the terminology on #7.

Reply to
Steve Ackman

a quick google search of: turbo carb production ...seems to show counterexamples. Mazda E5T, 78 kW 1.5L Carb 8V SOHC Turbo (limited edition.Turbo. models) ...and this

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And probably lots more. A turbo with a carb is more trouble but there's nothing magic about a turbo that makes FI necessary.

Nope on that one. I'm sure there are superchargers that go on one side of the carbs or the other out there too.

Reply to
Dave Hinz

I believe you need to have Flash enabled. I took a look at it too and didn't see anything. Just a big ole blank spot in the middle of the screen. I not going enable to Flash to mess with it any farther either...

Reply to
Leon Fisk

Wow! I never thought of those "ladies" standing on the corner as 4-cycle engines before. The description surely fits though ;-)

Reply to
Leon Fisk

Yeah, that's what I should have said. d8-)

Hahaha! Oh, I love it....

-- Ed Huntress

Reply to
Ed Huntress

Perhaps #7 should have been preceded by the statement: "In a manual transmission..." . Then their answer would make sense, eih? But then we should have assumed that since this was an automotive class test. Phil

Reply to
Phil Kangas

Reply to
Doug Miller

Not sure announcing you're only good for four strokes with the ladies is a message you want to go spreading, my friend.

Reply to
Dave Hinz

That was it. With Flash, it worked.

I got 98%, missing only #3 (because I misread it).

Lots of the questions are ambiguous, and one had to guess what the testwriter was visualizing.

Joe Gwinn

Reply to
Joseph Gwinn

There have certainly been supercharged and turbocharged engines that were carbureted.

Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer

They were supercharging engines long before fuel injection was used. Read a bit about pre-WW-II racing and land speed record engines. In addition, quite a few WW-II aircraft engines were supercharged and used carburetors.

Bruce-in-Bangkok (Note:displayed e-mail address is a spam trap)

Reply to
Bruce in Bangkok

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