Metal Tire Chain Question

I have one set of two winter tire chains. I don't want to go spend another $125 for two more at this time.
I have a Dodge 2500 short bed with Cummins and 4wd.
I need to go up to my cabin, and there should be a good bit of snow.
Question: Can I use one set if I put them on diagonally? I only have 1/4 mile or so to go using the chains, the rest of the way, I can do it on the road with 4WD. Or do I need to bite the bullet and go buy another set of chains?
What would you do?
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, if you only have 2 chains to put on a 4 wheel drive, put them both on the rear wheels and drive reasonably. Paul

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Put the first set on the rear, the second set is optional and goes on the front.
Steve B wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

I'd put both chains on the back . The front has the weight of the engine and all that to help with the traction . I'd also have a couple hundred pounds minimum load in the back , centered over the axle .
--

Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snag wrote:

Chains absolutely on the same axle, and the rear if it's only one set. Diagonal chains and 4WD with "open" diffs would in all probability put you in the ditch in seconds.
A couple hundred pounds won't do much on a 2500. On my Chev 3500 dually I regularly put a full layer of the 4x8x16 concrete blocks in the bed in the winter, somewhere around 1,200# and perhaps $40. The nice thing is the bed was still readily useable since it was a nice even 4" thick layer.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might think about securing them with a tied-down layer of plywood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ATP* wrote:

They don't slide around since it's a full layer. Any accident severe enough to launch them and I'm dead anyway so why would I care? Amazingly enough they have little to no effect on mileage.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can survive a roll over if the blocks don't hit you.
Wes S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perhaps laying them with mortar would keep them together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

Not when your medical directive is "Do not treat".
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is your life. Waste it your way.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 20:26:49 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com quickly quoth:

Waste? I'm a full body donor (when I die, I'm donating my body to science fiction) and my medical directive states "Do not resuscitate." I'd much rather move on to another life (the ultimate recycling: reincarnation!) than suffer the consequences of today's medical facilities and burden the taxpayers with yet another million or two in debt.
-- Friends Don't Let Friends Eat Turkey and Drive --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

More or less, however I intend to rot in peace and in one or more pieces. I'd much rather be dead than a victim of "modern medicine".
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
More or less, however I intend to rot in peace and in one or more

medicine".
For all you who say put the chains on the rear I'm here to tell you you're full of crap. _Always_ put the chains on the front! Haven't you heard the old saying "put your best foot forward" ? With chains up front you have steering control and the front wheels are breaking trail for the rears! Plus the fronts have the added weight for traction. With 2wd your shit out of luck anyway in deep snow, you may go back and forth with ease but you can't steer worth a damn so what good is that......... Phil Kangas in snow country and running chains for 30+ yrs.
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bull.
Phil Kangas wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Dec 2006 13:53:55 -0500, "Phil Kangas"

I'll just add that I was always told to put the chains on the front of four-wheel drives too. I haven't tried it myself (I do own an old Chevy K-10) but I have seen it done by others.
I wasn't going to answer because I had no personal experience to add and the tide was running in favor of putting them on the back. I have thought about it though and if I only had one set they would go on the front until I found a good reason not to put them there (shrug).
Either way I'm sure you will get stuck a whole lot better with them on :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon Fisk wrote:

In an unloaded pickup, you have engine weight helping the front tires get traction, while the rear tires need all the help they can get. The front drive train of a 4WD truck is typically weaker than the rear drive train and putting the chains on the front increases the chances of breaking a hub or axle while trying to move the truck with just front traction while the rears are spinning helplessly.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pete C." <> wrote in message

one
"modern
to
front
the
anyway
yrs.
on
done
and
better
front tires

can get. The

the rear drive

chances of

just front

I have to ask you Pete, why would you attempt to operate a vehicle without steering control? With front chains you can control your direction of travel; rear chains want to push you in a straight line especially if you have a posi-traction rear differential. Safety first! Phil Kangas
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil Kangas wrote:

You seem to be missing the point that the front tires *do* have traction thanks to the 75% of the vehicle weigh that is bearing down on them. It is the rears on an unloaded pickup that are in desperate need of traction. Also when braking, if you have traction in the front and not in the rear you *will* spin around.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Pete C."

the
they
than
the
with
a
control
differential.
have traction

down on them. It

need of

front and not

I missed this in your earlier post: "while the rears are spinning helplessly" ! You obviously have no experience by saying this. A rear _cannot_ spin until a front wheel spins and then only at the speed of the slipping front, no faster, impossible. Sure the rear is light, why weight it down, it only adds to the weight to be moved! You need to take a vacation, get out of that cubicle, rent an SUV and get some hands on experience, eih? Phil Kangas
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.