Nice Metalwork

I'm impressed...
http://stirlingsouth.com/art/critters.htm
Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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I am also impressed, and the woman looks good too.
i
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"Ignoramus23763" wrote:

She's too skinny for my tastes.
Jon
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shorten the url to http://stirlingsouth.com to get some more interesting metalworking
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

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Check these out too. http://www.myworthlesswebsite.com/sculptures.html Greg

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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 18:39:56 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm,

I love that cuppa joe in midair.
-- This would be the best of all possible worlds, if there were no religion in it. - John Adams
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quickly quoth:

I live about 100 miles from these sculptures so I have seen them in person. The gent that builds them does a great job on them. there is more than shown. If you ever get close Vining, MN it is worth the stop to see them. Greg
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 23:03:27 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm,

If I ever do get there, it sure won't be at THIS time of year, Greg. ;)
-- This would be the best of all possible worlds, if there were no religion in it. - John Adams
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Greeting all, Thanks for the kind words. Most all of the things you see on Stirlingsouth (www.stirlingsouth.com) and the Little Engine Pages (http://www.geocities.com/~rrice2 /) were made at the DeKalb Technical College Machine Tool Technology program in Clarkston, Georgia. Unfortunately, the Machine Tool program is closing. WE NEED YOUR HELP!! America is losing its ability to manufacture. The following link will take you to a 2005 report by Deloitte and the National Association of Manufacturers and the Manufacturing Institute. http://www.deloitte.com/dtt/cda/doc/content/us_mfg_talent_management_121405%281%29.pdf Among the more frightening quotes from this study are "The vast majority of American Manufacturers are experiencing a serious shortage of qualified employees, which in turn is causing significant impact to business and the ability of the country as a whole to compete in a global economy." And this one: "Also worrisome is the finding that 90 percent of respondents indicated a moderate to severe shortage of qualified skilled production employees, including front-line workers, such as machinists, operators, craft workers, distributors, and technicians." And this link to a CNN report listing the five occupations with the most severe shortages: http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/Careers/02/08/cb.unpopular.jobs/index.html Nurses are listed as number one and machinists are number two. Please read the reports I've listed and give them serious consideration. What can you do? If you think that it is a bad idea to close one of the remaining few Machine Tool Technology programs left in the country, please send an intellegent, well worded e-mail to Ronald W. Jackson, the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education Interim Commissioner ( snipped-for-privacy@dtae.org). Thank you, Richard Egge
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On 18 Feb 2007 17:47:57 -0800, "Richard Egge"

=======================If only from a national defense viewpoint it is indeed foolish to close a good metal working school, especially if it is the last one in the area.
You are to be commended for your concern, but this is almost certainly a "done deal." Even if you manage to postpone the program termination, rather than an abrupt one-time termination, the program will die the "death of a thousand cuts."
I suggest that a "shortage" does not exist just because some report [or even many reports] says it does. In the "free market" the only time a short exists is when the prices go up. Several surveys on this newsgroup and industry data indicates a falling rather than a rising wage rate, and thus a surplus rather than a shortage of qualified machinists.
To avoid shoveling "stuff" against the tide I suggest you examine this from the school administration's viewpoint.
1.    Machining programs are not high prestige academically, even if they produce award/prize-winning machinists/technicians.
2.    The per student hour cost is very high if you have/keep current equipment in comparison to other [academic] subjects which can get by with a whiteboard and some markers. The consumable supplies [tools and material] are also very costly.
3.    Fabrication programs tend to be "messy" with all sorts of "stuff" stacked in the corners; they generate chips/swarf and make noise. Academic programs by contrast are neat, clean and tidy, and quiet.
4.    There is a significant risk of injury and thus litigation and financial risk to the school with any sort of a "hands-on" fabrication program. About the worst that can happen in the conventional academic lecture based classes is a paper cut.
5.    The school can show a short-term budget improvement by closing the machining programs and selling the equipment. This also frees up space for additional academic programs.
6.    Qualified machining instructors seldom integrate well with the other instructional staff, and tend to ask highly awkward questions at faculty meetings, in addition to not liking Brie and sherry.
I have been down this particular "trail of tears" twice, and in both cases the machining programs were closed, the machinery sold off, and the schools became academic feeders for the area universities.
There was no great outcry from the major local manufacturing firms at the time of the program termination as these were in the main closing down and had no need for additional qualified personnel. However the resulting "shortage" was extensively used later as an excuse and rationale by corporate management.
I note in passing that the large area corporations that complained the loudest about the resulting "shortage" after program termination were among the most avid seekers of tax abatements, contributed nothing in the way of equipment, tooling or materials, and their representatives would only sporadically serve on the program advisory committees. The smaller owner operated shops were the best in this regard, contributing significant time, money, materials, and students to the program.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------ Watch out w'en you'er gittin all you want. Fattenin' hogs ain't in luck.
Joel Chandler Harris (1848-1908), U.S. journalist. Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings, "Plantation Proverbs" (1880).
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 14:15:13 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

More large metal sculpture here:
http://neme-s.org/Western_Trip_2006/Enchanted_Highway/enchanted_highway.htm
Errol Groff
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