OT: The free-trader's agenda

A Nov. 10th article by Alan Tonelson
formatting link
, titled "High-Tech
Jobs: Another Industry Races to the Bottom," contains this interesting
quote.
I assume the article is on the website. I'm quoting from a preliminary
draft:
"This year, technology and other white-collar outsourcing has become so
widespread, and the economy's job-creating powers have become so feeble,
that the issue has become front-page news and the public is revolting. Like
their counterparts in the rest of the economy, the multinational
tech-outsourcers and their apologists have begun to react with a combination
of almost refreshingly honest arrogance and insultingly incoherent
deception.
"In the former category, tech industry spokesman Harris Miller takes first
prize. President of the Information Technology Association of America,
Miller spent the late 1990s insisting that America faced a tech worker
shortage so enormous that only a flood of immigrant techies could fill the
gap. He also warned that, without such tech worker imports, these firms
would send the jobs overseas.
"Now, as unemployment in technology still tops 8 percent despite months of
better economic growth, Miller has shifted toward defending outsourcing as a
"hard truth" that Americans must face. The nation's main hope for stemming
this job flight? As Miller told Congress, "downward pressure on salaries."
In other words, U.S. technology workers should plunge deeper into the global
race to the bottom.
"More funding for technology education would help, too, he added. But Miller
was surely relieved that no Congressmen asked him how this would improve
America's competitiveness with foreign workers who he argued can "compete
for increasingly more sophisticated and complex IT work" at "a fraction" of
U.S. costs."
If there's been any doubt about the "free-trade" agenda of this
administration and its multinational cronies, it should be evaporating to
nothing right about now.
Look for the full article at the web address above.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
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With the likelihood of overall employment going up, but with widespread displacements causing high-paying employment to go down, the public's mood next November is going to be verrrrrry interesting, to say the least.
Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
This has been happening for a couple of years. I have several IBMer friends whose jobs have gone to India and I know that several of the PC builders have moved their support lines over there. And it is not just high tech. Service jobs are leaving too. I think one of the big credit card companies sponsors a school in India just to teach potential customer service reps how to talk with a mid Western accent.
That is the pitiful thing about the outrageous right. They blindly support this administration for it's testosterone overdosed policies while the administration robs them of their jobs for the benifit of their big contributor friends.
Ed Huntress wrote:
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
CEO Salaries? Surely they'll see before long these folks from India must be good at business, or they wouldn't have all the jobs. Anything else we can give away while we're at it?
Reply to
Charlie Gary
hey, I know being a CEO is a really tough job. But I'm up to the challenge. I'll work my ass off for a measly million a year. I'll even clean house and get rid of all the VPs with the large lips stuck to the previous CEOs butt. What would I do with all that money saved? Spend it, to find enough work to keep everyone else on the payroll so busy they'll be worrying about getting a day off occasionally.
Gary H. Lucas
Reply to
Gary H. Lucas
SNIPPED
Charlie/Ed, I don't think that Mr. Bush was that much different than his predecessor, who signed NAFTA, which got the ball rolling. For that matter I don't think any president can really stop the flow of jobs overseas, because they are all in the back pockets of the large multi-national corporations. The large companies give to both sides of the aisle, so they have their bases covered no matter who is in office.
In a way I'm glad that the white collar crowd is getting their ox gored, this may wake people up to the fact that it is not just us folks who get our hands dirty for a living that are losing jobs.
Reply to
Garlicdude
I'm sorry, Gary, but these wild, Liberal ideas are not acceptable in today's free market economy. Seeing you work your ass off like a dog for that kind of money isn't entertaining to most Americans these days, so nobody will care enough to see you get the job. I shouldn't say that just yet, though. Do you have big, bulky muscles, or some cool tatoos for people to look at? How about some really crazy hair, or perhaps no hair with a tatoo on your head? Then people might pay attention. Until then, though, you and your kind will just have to go along for the ride. ;-)
Reply to
Charlie Gary
snip-=
Until we Americans get over our arrogance of thinking that we're worth more than other nations citizens, I see no solution to the problem of disappearing jobs. Not only are we not worth more money, we are also in a losing position where quality is concerned. A sad statement considering the position we used to occupy in the world's opinion.
One of the harsh realities all of us must face is the fact that until wages in our country reach an average with the wages of other countries, we will continue to experience blood letting in the economy and the job market. One of two things must happen in order for us to be able to compete with other nations, including China, where the general attitude seems to be that nothing they produce is of quality (but everyone should know better).
1) Wages in every country will rise to meet ours ---
----or----
2) Every working person performing tasks that can be performed elsewhere must experience a wage cut, becoming competitive with foreign workers.
Which one do you think is most likely?
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
So If #2 must happen please tell me just how cities & states will do on 10% of the taxes they're used to? Fire all the police while all the people are rioting because they can't buy food?
Reply to
Why
It will be the 2nd choice, which is why it's important to offer services other shops in other countries don't. There's work of that type out there, just not enough to support as many as manufacturing in general used to. Gotta keep looking to be better than the other guy. Look at South Korea. They're doing what the Japanese did a few decades ago, which is what the U.S. did a few decades before that. They're working their asses off, building an industrial base with a team attitude. They work hard and help their neighbor. Americans used to be that way, but these days most Americans only care about themselves. How many can actually say they know the names of all their neighbors within an eight-house radius? If you don't care about your neighbors, they probably don't care about you, or your job. They don't know you, so why should they care about the issues that affect you? They're too busy flipping channels between Entertainment Tonight and MTV2 to find out what's going on in the real real world. I'll shut up, now.
Reply to
Charlie Gary
So this is a right wing phenomenon? Interesting spin. Provide cites if you would. Just be aware I will post a rebuttle indicating this is a business phenomenon. Unless there are no Lefties in business and they are all on the dole.
Ready?
Gunner
"The British attitude is to treat society like a game preserve where a certain percentage of the 'antelope' are expected to be eaten by the "lions". Christopher Morton
Reply to
Gunner
Agreed!
Gunner
"The British attitude is to treat society like a game preserve where a certain percentage of the 'antelope' are expected to be eaten by the "lions". Christopher Morton
Reply to
Gunner
I got a B.S. in Computer Science in 1982 and have spent much of the time since then involved with computers.
Though lots of people said, "Go into computers, there will ALWAYS be demand" since the early 1990's I didn't believe it. Much of traditional computer work is unbelievably tedious and menial. The word picture I use is computer programmers are similar to the laborers that worked sometimes hundreds of years to build medieval cathedrals. Just hacking and chipping away at large stones...
"Mechanization" in programming and computers has taken away jobs too, as well as the jobs going overseas. The Microsoft commercials about Windows Server 2003 saving money? Some of the savings is the fewer number of people needed to baby-sit the network! The .NET framework allows easy implementation of many things that used to be very difficult. More and more devices show up in the market fully programmed, and it was just a handful of programmers that went into making it.
I lost my computer-related job as part of the fallout from the .com crash. Maybe this year I'll make half of what I used to make. The first year after was nowhere close to half.
I don't know the answers... how do you have a global market and protection at the same time? But I thought the group might appreciate my perspective that wrench turning isn't much different from code pounding.
-- Mark
Reply to
Mark Jerde
Really stinks, doesn't it? Who to blame? Looks to me like everyone will bite the bullet, like it or not. Do we have any choices otherwise?
No, I don't suggest I have a solution, but I sure as hell can see the problem.
Harold
Reply to
Harold & Susan Vordos
Something funny happened today. I got a call from the press secretary of a congressman whose name you would recognize as one of the most right-wing, flag-waving conservatives in America. We talked for a while about something his boss wanted publicized and, in the course of discussing it, said press secretary went off on a rant about multinational corporations that would make your hair curl -- those of us who still have some hair.
This congressman is considered a cornerstone of the Republican Party's right wing. But he's fighting the administration tooth and nail over globalization and "free" trade.
So you could say that this is far from being a left/right phenomenon, but it is a pro/anti administration phenomenon. As for business, it's a multinational/everyone-else phenomenon.
And there are cronies on both sides -- shop owners who have multinational customers, or pro-administration types who own small businesses...and, on the other side, conservative congressmen who have, or used to have, large manufacturing plants in their districts.
Overall, it's a pretty strange bunch of alliances. You should hear some of the bedrock, northern-Illinois-boiled-in-linseed Republican shop owners I talk to, who say that, next time, they're voting for the Democrat.
Clinton bought the globalization party line, and that's why I smirk when you blame him for "liberal" economic policies. In almost every way, he was more economically conservative than George Bush I. The difference is that he wasn't presiding over $460 billion trade deficits and tax deficits that are intended to gut Social Security and Medicare by "starving the beast," as the neocons put it.
But that's right up George II's alley. Bring on the trade deficits, they don't matter. Bring on the deficit spending. Together, they'll squeeze all the fat out of this society and turn it into a lean, mean, fighting machine. Soy burgers and Freedom Fries are plenty good enough for them.
Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Free Trade in this instance = Free Profit
Jim
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Reply to
jim rozen
outsourcing
considering
That reminds me again of the joke about two guys walking through the woods that meet a hungry bear. The first one bends down and puts on running shoes. The second guy says you can't outrun a bear. The first guy says he doesn't have to, he only needs to outrun the other guy! We all know the bear is going to have lunch, the name of game is trying not to be it.
Gary H. Lucas
Reply to
Gary H. Lucas
I drove by the car dealer down the street the other day. There was a line of about 50 Humvees on the lot in every different color. Quite a testament to the problem I think.
Unfortunately I think the pain is going fall mostly on those of us who already drive a car till it drops, have no credit card debt, wait until we can afford to buy the good stuff and then keep it forever.
Gary H. Lucas
Reply to
Gary H. Lucas

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