OT: Win7 networking


New OS for me: windows 7. I skipped Vista
Anyway I have a home network named Hillside with seven 'puters.
I'm trying and trying to get this new 'puter to find and join the existing
network. No joy. This was SO EASY in XP, just click on a wizard and fill in
the blanks. Note: I do see the router and have internet on this machine.
I've been flailing about in control panel and network settings trying to
change the name from the default "network4" with no luck. I must be missing
something, this should be easy.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Loading thread data ...
Try logging on as "Administrator".
Reply to
John R. Carroll
BTDT, I am administrator
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I wish you well Karl. Uncle has a Win7 computer. I hate dealing with it. I'm a W2K guy with XP (not much of a change) on my laptop.
Is there anything like "My Computer"? I'm not near a Win7 box atm. If so, right click, properties, network identification, properties.
Do you have a taskbar LAN icon on the right? If so, right click and work up the tree of menu options.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
OK As that user? The reason I mentioned it is that I've had to install a couple of network software liscences on 7 and it just wasn't happenin' as a user with administrative priveleges. Encryption hardware device drivers were the same. I don't mind having to proceed that way but I didn't enjoy looking like a dope in front of a customer.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
I had probs getting the son and d-i-l hooked up to my XP network too . Don't have one (win7 box) here right now to look at , but there is a way . IIRC I never could see them from my XP boxes , but they could see my comps because she installed several programs I keep on my server . XP Pro/SP3 is my OS of choice in almost every case . Unless I wanna play some of my old games .
Reply to
Snag
Try this..
Can't see other computers on the network
QUESTION: I set up my new Windows 7 Home computer to connect to my home network and I can access the Internet but I can't see my other two computers that are connected to my network. I can see the Windows 7 computer from my other Vista computers, though. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? Thanks! - Jay L.
ANSWER: When you connect to a network for the first time, you're asked to specify whether it's a home, work or public network. If you don't specify a location, Windows 7 assumes it's a public network, just to be safe. That means it turns off network discovery, so you won't be able to "see" the other computers on the network.
In Control Panel, go to the Network and Sharing Center and check to see if the network is labeled as public. If it is, click "Public Network" and change the location to "Home" or "Work" network.
Reply to
Big Brother
I wish I could write down directions but all I can say is that it'll work. I fussed for about half an hour before everything fell in place. Public/private, administrator/user, local network, ect. It's in there somewhere. 7 is a masterpiece! ...if you have the resources and horsepower.
Reply to
Buerste
What firewall are you using? I installed Zone Alarm on a friend's win 7 computer and turned off the Windows firewall.
Then I set an IP range for all the computers on the network.
I configured it to the same network name, and connected to all the computers (all XP) on that network.
It took about 15 minutes. It was a lot easier than with Vista.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Maybe so, if you are running Windows 7 Pro. However, Microsoft failed to include some of the usual network management tools in Windows 7 Home, so that for some problems you have to run Regedit and make changes directly in the registry. Several examples of this appear in
Reply to
James Waldby
This link gives me a blank page. I could sure use some more help here.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
The solution: Registry editing for LAN manager authentication level (in Home edition this can be configured through registry)
How to do it: 1 . Open registry editor ( Start search - regedit) 2 . Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa 3. Create a new DWORD value with the following properties: NAME: LmCompatibilityLevel
VALUE: 1 4. Restart your PC and try the connection again...
Reply to
John R. Carroll
Yes, that's the first example at the link. Karl, you could go to
and enter following in search box: Share not working through Windows 7 home which will bring up a list of 689 threads related to those terms. The page I mentioned is first on the list, but some of the other pages might be relevant also, depending on exact symptoms.
Reply to
James Waldby
"This link gives me a blank page. I could sure use some more help here."
I took him at his word. If you look down the page someone reported that this fix worked.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
Right, it worked for that person's problem with Windows 7, which however may differ from Karl's, so I wanted him to be able to see the whole page (via searching for Share not working through Windows 7 home at )
Unfortunately for users of Microsoft Windows 7 Home, fixes that one person reports often don't work for other people, due to apparently trivial setup differences.
Reply to
James Waldby
Good old Micro$oft. Sheesh. I'm glad I don't have the "Home" edition of anything. "Home Edition" appears to be a sales tool rather than a complete and functional product. There sure are a lot of "Editions" of 7.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
John sez: "The solution: Registry editing for LAN manager authentication level (in Home edition this can be configured through registry)"
Call me PC-phobic, but in my experience messing around with the registry is fraught with all sorts of dangers.
Bob Swinney
Karl Townsend wrote:
How to do it: 1 . Open registry editor ( Start search - regedit) 2 . Browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa 3. Create a new DWORD value with the following properties: NAME: LmCompatibilityLevel
VALUE: 1 4. Restart your PC and try the connection again...
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Ok, you're PC-phobic. With that out of the way, here are three points:
(1) Karl said he couldn't read the page at the link I gave, so John just quoted part of that page, which is hosted at microsoft.com.
(2) To fix some Windows 7 Home problems requires registry changing with Regedit, no easy way around it. In Home, Microsoft left out certain network tools that it included with Pro.
(3) "Messing with the registry" is more cumbersome but is not more dangerous than other Microsoft Windows administrative activities. Windows administrative tools change the Registry, that's what they do.
Reply to
James Waldby
If it's the "Home" version, it's not intended for use on a network with local computers, bits are missing, as with all "Home" versions since XP. I've just installed Ultimate, it went out and found the WiFi and the rest of the computers on the net automatically during install and grabbed all the updates off the internet during installation, too. It also managed to kill my non-Windows email PC, died somewhere in the networking stack when 7 went out and touched it. If you can get a "Home" version to see local machines on a network, it's probably going to take some registry hacking and my hat's off to you if and when you get it going. I've had various "Home" editions included with laptops, first one I tried for a couple of days to get it working on the local net, finally dumped Vista and went to XP Pro. 10 minutes after installation, I was sharing files with the rest of the computers. So far, all I can say about Win 7 is they call it that because it's 7X more aggravating than XP.
Stan
Reply to
stans4

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.