OT: Wireless Home Network

Anybody got any links to doo basic info on setting up a wireless home network?
The objective is to allow two laptops to share a Comcast cable modem
connection. One laptop is a brand new Dell Inspiron 9300 (XP Pro) with built-in 802.11 g and the other is an older Toshiba laptop (XP Home) using a Linksys WPC54G card. The other hardware consists of a Motorola SB5120 cable modem and a Linksys WRT54G router.
I've got the Inspiron talking to the router OK via wireless and the Linksys card on the Toshiba sees the network but will not connect to the Internet. I've tried running the Linksys setup wizard and the MS network setup wizard from the Dell but still can't get the Toshiba to access the Internet. Both laptops are running the current version of Norton Internet Security and the OS's on both laptops are updated for the most recent patches.
I'm thinking that the firewall built into the router may be refusing to talk to the Toshiba and that I'll need to configure it to allow that connection - does that sound like a reasonable approach?
Mike
PS: add me to the list of folks here that would have a few choice words for Bill Gates should we ever meet.
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Anybody got any links to doo basic info on setting up a wireless home network?
The objective is to allow two laptops to share a Comcast cable modem connection. One laptop is a brand new Dell Inspiron 9300 (XP Pro) with built-in 802.11 g and the other is an older Toshiba laptop (XP Home) using a Linksys WPC54G card. The other hardware consists of a Motorola SB5120 cable modem and a Linksys WRT54G router.
I've got the Inspiron talking to the router OK via wireless and the Linksys card on the Toshiba sees the network but will not connect to the Internet. I've tried running the Linksys setup wizard and the MS network setup wizard from the Dell but still can't get the Toshiba to access the Internet. Both laptops are running the current version of Norton Internet Security and the OS's on both laptops are updated for the most recent patches.
I'm thinking that the firewall built into the router may be refusing to talk to the Toshiba and that I'll need to configure it to allow that connection - does that sound like a reasonable approach?
Mike
PS: add me to the list of folks here that would have a few choice words for Bill Gates should we ever meet.
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Mike Henry wrote:

Don't have links but do have something to check; in Network Properties, make sure the protocol entry 'TCP/IP -> wireless adapter' is set as the default protocol.
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Mike Henry wrote:

It sounds like you are mostly there. If your Toshiba sees your network it sounds like your laptop has been given a IP address. I'm assuming the laptop is using DHCP to be assigned a IP address and the router is acting as a DHCP server and passing them out. If that wasn't working correctly I'd not expect your Toshiba to even see the network.
I've seen where the browser will talk to the internet, but the mail client won't. That's usually a setting problem in the mail program. If neither one will talk, that's not it. Have you tried 'pinging' a remote address (ie: from a command prompt type ping www.google.com or something to see if you can get out at all. This would remove the browser and mail program from the mix.
John
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wrote:

Try PINGing an IP Address. On the working system, go to the command prompt and enter "ping www.google.com" You will get a response saying, for instance, pinging 70.14.207.99. Go to the not working system and ping 70.14.207.99.
If that works, and pinging google does not, you have to set up your DNS.
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John Worman wrote:

That reminds me of something that happens to my computers regularly.
Often when I reboot one of my computers, the IP address will change from something like 192.168.1.100 to let's say 192.168.1.101.
Well, since I have identified the computers on my network in Zonealarm (my firewall, I have disabled the XP firewall), by their IP address in the "trusted zone", I have to change the IP address for the computers in question there also.
To find the IP address of your particular computer, go to Start, Run and type cmd. This will take you to a DOS command prompt (don't you just love Bill Gates). Now type: ipconfig This will give you the IP address of your computer. If this is not the same as the IP address of that computer in your firewall, than this is your problem.
I hope this helps.
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    [ ... ]

    You need to find out how to apply static IP addresses, instead of accepting them from the DHCP server in the router/hub. Then things would not be changing on you when you reboot. Then turn off the DHCP, if the hub/router allows you to.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Don posted:
"You need to find out how to apply static IP addresses, instead of accepting them from the DHCP server in the router/hub."
Huh? Unless you have an entirely local network, without cable Internet access, the DHCP server is located at the ISP's facility, and not is your local router/hub.
Perhaps a more important consideration is that almost all ISPs charge a heavy premium for a static IP address, and most high-speed Internet access providers don't offer this option at any price. Some people will argue that this is done to prevent people from effective hosting websites from their home, but the real reason is that the ISP has only a limited size block of IPs assigned to them that they must share will all users. That's why with cable access you have a time limit on your rights to a particular IP (typically a day or two) and then it changes. Research the unit called an Erlang, because it applies here.
Harry C.
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Not if you have linksys or several other vendors' hardware. The switchgear gets a DHCP address from the ISP (your "real" IP address as seen by the outside world), and then assigns a DHCP address to each system on your internal network, depending on how you set it up. Security being what it is, I woudn't have a box in my house on a publically addressable IP address.

And if broadband wasn't always on, or nearly so, that excuse would be credible. It's not.

Still sounds like them trying to stop you from hosting; as if the dynamic DNS places don't exist for just that reason...
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I think you are missing the point of what is happening. In my case I have a static IP but I could have dynamic. The ISP assigns the modem an IP address and the modem, in my case a Netgear, performs network address translation so that the network inside the modem can have a local address scheme such as 192.168.?.?, it also performs DHCP if required for the internal network . The local address scheme won't be seen outside on the internet and the computers on the internal network can be configured with static IP addresses as required, it will have no effect on what is seen beyond the modem by the ISP. The ISP wouldn't be assigning the user a 192.168.?.? address as these are reserved for local network use.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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    The ISP runs a DHCP server to assign IPs to the cable modem or (A)SDL modem. However, that modem is typically also a hub, and is running NAT to translate that single IP address which you got from the ISP to a block of local addresses. The 192.168.0.0/16 block is one of a group which are not to be routed directly to the outside, so only if they undergo NAT translation will they reach the outside, and this NAT translation can be made dependent on which port address (and thus which service) is being accessed.
    Anyway -- the original poster's Zonealarm, complaining about a change from 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.101 is dealing with an IP address from the DHCP *internal* to the modem/hub. When he rebooted a machine, it got a new IP address -- from his modem/hub, not from this ISP. His ISP would not be allocating IPS like 192.168.0.100, as that can go nowhere without being translated to a non-private IP range.
    And it is *this* which can be fixed with static IPs.

    And even more so for a full class-C block (256 addresses), which is what I have, since I have a T1 feed, instead of (A)DSL or cable modem.

    Immaterial, as Zonealarm is seeing only the *local* IP addresses generated by the DHCP in the box after NAT translation, and *that* was what I was suggesting that he change to static IPs so his Zonealarm would not need to be told about new IP addresses after each reboot.

    Not really -- as this is happening locally -- in communications between the customer's modem/hub and the local computers, not between the ISP and the customer.
    And if the service is to provide full-time connection to the net, then the ISP must have a large enough block of IP addresses to handle all customers at the same time -- which suggests that the mobility of the IP addresses *is* to prevent running servers. (And in particular to disjoint servers installed by virus installed backdoors to serve as web sites pointed to by spam.)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Bear in mind that with a firewall in place it may be able to filter ICMP packets, if it is then items like ping and traceroute won't function.
John Worman wrote:

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On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 11:48:49 -0500, "Mike Henry"

You need the settings on all systems the same - particularly the SSID. Don't use WEP until you get everything working, if at all.

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Remember the password has to be the same for the network. You are creating a network - and each computer must sign in to the router with the same password.. I think you set it on one and not the other ?
I have three computers on my Router - this one direct, but the shop that is 200 feet away is on line and so is 'rover' - our laptop.
OBTW - if you have more than one printer - look at the USB print server by Linksys. Both a parallel port and a USB port - so your printers could be in another room and you each print to which one you want. I have a color and my 4MV on one here and my 5mxci or some alpha mess in the shop and another due to the position - for my E-size plotter. They are Way Cool.
They must be hardwired at the first setup (I think download a driver/upload ID) and then it goes wireless.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Mike Henry wrote:

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Thanks for all of the replies - I'll check each of them out. The network is at my sister's house and a root canal today prevented me from getting over there to check anything out.
The router is set up with WEP and that d&%mned multi-character pass phrase that it it incorporates really ticks me off as it has to be keyed in twice
Martin - Odd that you should mention a printer as that will be the next order of business once the the two laptops are communicating. It's an old LJ 4L with a parallel to USB cable that will be connected to a Linksys USB print server. That should be almost as much fun to figure out as the really old JetDirect server I hooked up between a Designjet and Linksys router on my own home network. No way to hook it up direct as the new Inspiron 9300 laptop lacks either parallel or serial ports. One thing at a time, though.

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Not being there, it's hard to say, but in a Windows environment:
The router is your gateway to the outside world, it's settings should be the same as the PC you originally reached out with, typically it would get an IP dynamically. These would typically be under "WAN" settings.
Your network (LAN) should then support DHCP. THis will allow your networked machines to obtain their IP from the router. To setup DHCP you typcially set an IP address pool. Your router will probably have an internal IP of 192.168.1.1, another common IP is 192.168.2.1. Your documentation should show that. The second part of DHCP setup is setting a range, either the number of addresses or an ending IP address, setup more than the two (you may have a guest) 32, is a nice even number. These IP's are then "leased" to each node, the lease time can be set. This reserves the IP for that period of time - so your guest machines don't have to keep requesting a new IP. The DHCP settings should also set the guest machines gateway and DNS server address(es).
Your PC's should be set to obtain their IP address automatically. This through a variety of ways, including right-clicking on My Network Places and selecting properties. Pick the local area connection, right-click it and select properties. From the properties dialog, General Tab, find and select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Press the "Properties" button, make sure the "Obtain an IP address automatically" is selected, along with "Obtain DNS server address automatically".
Once that's set, and you're connected to the router. Check your current ip configuration. Open a command prompt window, or Start | Run | cmd and type in ipconfig. You should see a report like: Windows IP Configuration
Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.6 Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0 Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
If the IP address isn't in the same address range as you set for DHCP, then DHCP is not setup properly. If you don't have a valid IP, you'll get nowhere.
You can also check by pinging your gateway. ping 192.168.1.1 Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes2 time<1ms TTL0 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes2 time<1ms TTL0 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes2 time<1ms TTL0 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes2 time<1ms TTL0
Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
If you can't ping your gateway (router) then you're not connected right, or again, DHCP isn't giving you an IP (DHCP is not active).
Finally, you can check to see if you're getting to the outside world:
ping 68.142.226.53
which is yahoo
and
ping www.yahoo.com
If the first ping 62.142.226.53 works, but www.yahoo.com does not, then your DNS is not working. DNS is what translates www.yahoo.com into a valid IP (NS = name server).
Go slowly, be particular and careful. A small error in IP range or address can drive you crazy.
In contrast to one reply, there is no "login to the network". You can establish a workgroup other than the default. Your machines will not appear when you browse the network until they establish a share. One of the computers will become the master browser (google that). Once you establish a share, then the computer will appear. That does not mean you can't communicate between them, it's just a windows oddity.
Good luck.
Mike Henry said the following on 9/22/2005 11:48 AM:

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Mike Henry wrote:

Call Linksys tech support. Their support is free and fantastic. I have Linksys WiFi hardware also, and over the years I have called them several times.
Each time they have been nothing short of fantastic. The last time I talked to them, I was talking to someone in India. Made no difference. The woman who helped me was courteous and patient. A very positive experience.
For that reason alone, i will always stick with Linksys, ... and hope that their tech support will still be the way it has been for me so far.
Abrasha http://www.abrasha.com
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Abrasha, I have to agree with your comments about Linksys products and the telephone support that they provide. I also have to complement on the telephone support that they provide for the installation of their cable Internet on your computer. (It appears to mostly come from canada.) The Comcast tech rep completely walked me through the setup for my then new Windoze XP Pro operating system, step-by-step. I couldn't ask for better technical support from either firm.
Just as an aside, Abrasha, I really love that creation displayed on your website. I can't even imagine the methods that you employed to create it so perfectly!
Harry C.
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2005 11:48:49 -0500, "Mike Henry"

No. That router doesn't need to be setup for each computer.
I assume that the Toshiba was connected to the internet at some time. If so how?
Sounds like a firewall problem. Are you running a firewall such as Zone Alarm. If not you should. Don't depend on the XP firewall it only works in one direction. If you do have a firewall then you must set it up properly.
If the Toshiba sees the network (You said it does) then the router is not refusing to talk to the Toshiba but pinging will answer that question.
Shut down ALL firewalls and Norton. You have a router which gives you enough protection until you solve the problem.
Run ipconfig and write down the IP addresses of each computer and get the router IP value. Probably 192.168.1.1 for that Linksys.
I have the same router with four computers two on Cat 5, a laptop sometimes on Cat 5 and sometimes wireless depending on where it is, and a third desktop which runs on Cat 5 or wireless depending on what I am doing with it.
Open your browser and enter the IP address of your router. 192.168.1.1 ?? The router password is probably "admin" unless you changed it. Leave the other box empty. Click on "Status" Does it show "connected" ? from each computer? Note: If you really are paranoid about virus problems you can disconnect the router here when you are offline. Of course you need to reconnect when you want to go online. A PITA but secure.
Click on "Setup" This will show the router's IP address which you know or you wouldn't be here but it also shows you the starting range of the computers on the router. Subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0 Leave the default for DHCP users and the rest below should be zeros. DHCP enabled.
Ping all three from each computer. If you can ping all then you have a connection.
Start---Run--- type cmd
type ping "IP address" where IP address is the one you got above by running ipconfig (no quotes)
Let us know what you get from pinging.

I disagree here. He may be like sleeping with an elephant but if we had several hundred operating systems it would be a nightmare. Bill Gates frequently gets the blame when the problem is between the chair and the keyboard.

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Sounds like the same problem I had. As recieved, the router in my system was configured so that each wireless connection had to be specifically authorized in the setup. My machines would seem to connect, but then fail to work. They would see the network, just could not use it. jk
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