Pictures of sorted metals


They are somewhat annotated.
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Reply to
Ignoramus5865
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Looks like a nice pile for your hobby.
Ten years ago, I was at an auction. When they got to the metal room, they started on one box of cold rolled and nobody bid. So the auctioneer said, how much for the whole lot? I was right in front and said $100. One other guy bid 110 then I went $120. And it was done. The rest of the group got PISSED thinking we were bidding on the cold rolled. I had just bought over 10,000 pounds of various tool steels. Took two trips with my one ton truck. I sold the H13 off for $1000 and one piece of P20 for $500 (mold plate)
Bet the auctioneer learned that all metal isn't just scrap metal.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
You didn't sort the beer into its own pile :-(
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Iggy was putting a well understood scale of reference in the picture. :)
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Awesome. YOU SUCK!!!!
I bet he does not care.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16496
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ LOL
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
A lot of my job pictures included a pack of cigarettes - drove my immediate supervisor right up the wall, much to the amusement of his supervisor who used to bum smokes from me. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
I think that including beer in pictures kind of brightens the mood of most people. Beer is usually associated with fun and other pleasant things. Plus a bottle of beer looks great if the picture is taken with a powerful flash.
In addition, everyone knows how big is a bottle of beer, not so with cigarettes any more.
The more politically correct scale item would be a Coke can, but I do not like pop and so I choose beer, cans or bottles.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16496
Iggi -
Need to get a paint pen and mark the bars as you know.
After time - one will forget.
Martin
Ignoramus5865 wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Martin, I sorted them, but never marked any. If the bars had markings, I would put them in the proper pile, the rest into the mystery metal pile. That place was good at marking and most pieces were marked.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus16496
"Ignoramus16496" wrote in message
In my last two offices I had a picture of my wife with a 30-06 rifle and a big dead deer she just shot on the wall in the waiting room. Boy did that break ice and relax people. In 14 years here was only one complaint.
Reply to
Michael Koblic
A spark test on a grinding wheel comparing the unknown with a known piece of metal will usually give you a good idea of what it is. Another test is to full harden a small piece by heating it until it loses its magnetic attraction and dropping it into cold water. Then test for how hard it is.
John
Reply to
John
A beer would not have looked good in pictures of construction projects on an airport! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
I bought out the stockroom of a tool and die shop eight years ago that had over 4 tons of marked tool steels. Most of it was Carpenter Steel stamped with their special trade names, Badger, Vega,Speedstar, Stentor. Solar,#158 and Hampden. I loaded it Carboloy and pallets and the riggers moved it along with a bunch of machinery I bought at the auction. My back was aching for a week. Most of it was 158 mold steel in rounds up to 9 inches and some blocks up to 12 inch square. The rest of it was in smaller rectangles and cutoffs. Metal usually goes cheap if it is in large lots. The dealers don't want it because it doesn't usually come with certifications and it is too much to handle for the average home machinist.
I got the whole supply room for 200 bucks including the racks.
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John
Reply to
John
Awesome. What did you do with that steel?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus12951
Quite right too! ('T'was a wind-up, by the way :)
Regards Mark Rand(who has over 1000lb of mild steel sections that were given away from a University store) RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I have used up a lot of it over the years making repair parts for machinery of my customers. The oil hard stuff I don't use much of because of the problems with heat treating and quenching in oil. You have to heat the oil to about 140 degrees or there is a chance of the piece cracking at high stress areas like keyway cuts. The Carpenter 158 is a very tough steel and can be carborized to give it a high surface hardness. This works great for pins and shafts where you need a good wearing surface but also the toughness underneath the surface hardness.
Having a good selection of metal on hand saves a lot of time in doing emergency repairs. I can make a replacement for a broken part and have it done the same day. Ordering material takes at least a day and sometimes more.
John
Reply to
John

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