Sears Tools

I recently purchased the Sears "Professional" Lithium batteried driver
drills. I purchased two because I was in the process of erecting a metal
building. The batteries and charger worked good but the keyless chuck on
both drills exhibit what I call "Auto Loosen". I have several other keyless
chucks in my shop and none of these exhibit the same characteristics. I
called Sears Customer Service to complain and they told me to visit my local
Sears dealer. The local Sears dealer told me to call Customer Service.
Whoa!! I've been a victim of that before. I will now look for my tool
requirements somewhere else.
Stu Fields
Reply to
Stuart & Kathryn Fields
Loading thread data ...
Exactly what did you want to happen. Neither the local dealer or customer service can really fix the problem if all of that model have chucks that loosen while being used. You might be able to convince them to let you return the drills as defective, but I don't think there is any way you are going to get a drill that is better.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
SKF:
Perhaps a polite letter asking them if you should take the issue up with the Consumer Products Safety Commission or other appropriate regulatory agency will help. Appeals for the involvement of outside authorities is the only way I've ever obtained Sears' attention in such matters.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Reply to
Edward Hennessey
Of course there is a way to get a better drill -- buy a Bosch, Makita, or Milwaukee.
Reply to
Doug Miller
Don't forget, you can make your own (much stronger) by killing some hydrochloric acid with a handful of zinc. (I presume you have zinc lying around if you're galvanising stuff.) Otherwise use scrap galvanised steel.
Cheers -- Jeff R.
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in news:C%k%i.5642$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr17.news.prodigy.net:
The drill isn't the problem, the keyless chucks are. I have yet to find a keyless chuck for a portable drill that works worth a damn for very long. We've tried several brands, including the high dollar carbide jaw jacobs, all would probably do fine for home, non-professional use, but they just won't stand up to the all day, every day work environment. Buy a good quality keyed chuck and be done with it. We've got 2 crapsman cordless drills that work all day every day and they have been around since '02, the chucks lasted less than a week though.
Reply to
Anthony
Haven't had a problem yet with the keyless chucks on either my Bosch cordless, or my Makita corded, despite heavy daily use.
Hmmm.... maybe it's you?
Reply to
Doug Miller
I bought the 19.4 volt combo kit from Sears. My electric drill does the same thing and it is very frustrating. I've lost several bits because of it happening when I was on top of a ladder.
Bill Longyard
Reply to
William Longyard
Dan: I wanted them to acknowledge the problem and tell me that they were busy finding another chuck. I have a Makita with a keyless chuck that I've had for maybe 10 years and other than the Ni-Cad battery issues, the drill continues to outshine the Sears stuff. See another posting below where another guy has had the same problem with the Sears drill. The chuck is a piece of Sh-t. I've got at least 5 other keyless chucks being used in my lathe, mill, drill press and other cord and cordless drills. None of these has exhibited the problems I'm having with the Sears unit. They need to have a recall or send a new useable chuck out to all the people that bought their "Professional" drills. Stu
Reply to
Stuart & Kathryn Fields
Bill: I've now in the habit of carrying as many as three extra drill bits if I'm operating on the top of a ladder or some inacessable location. I used to buy a lot of Sears tools, kitchen appliances etc. but that has now come to a screeching halt based on the "bump the dummy" response I got when I tried to file a complaint.
Stu
Reply to
Stuart & Kathryn Fields
I've had problems with keyless on Black and Decker, Ryobi, Milwalkee, Dewalt and Makita. The Dewalt went the longest.
And if your hands are grimy and sweaty keyless truely suck. (Not locating the key to be fair sucks too.)
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Years ago I purchased a 3/8" variable speed reversible hand drill from Sears. It lasted about a week. It was returned, but I was advised to take it in for repairs. I insisted I couldn't wait for ten days, as I was in process of building a house and needed it immediately. I was provided a second drill by the store.
To make a long story short, this was repeated twice more, so when the third drill died, I returned it to the store and demanded a refund. I added some money to the refund and purchased a Black & Decker, identical characteristics as the Sears model, but more money. I am still using the same drill motor, but I have replaced the power cord once.
I no longer spend my money on power tools from Sears. It's obvious to me that the only difference between their products and those from HF is the price. If I must settle for inferior quality, I insist the price be in keeping with what I receive.
I recall that Sears was a quality operation dealing with quality merchandise when I was a boy. How things have changed.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Sears was never a "high quality" operation. But they did sell decent quality goods at fair prices to what I call the "advanced amateur" market, i.e., farmers, gas stations, etc.
But now Sears is owned by K-Mart...
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster
On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 20:34:55 -0500, with neither quill nor qualm, "William Longyard" quickly quoth:
See the Wreck (rec.woodworking) for long notes on the ARHA feature of Crapsman routers. That's Automatic Random Height Adjuster, including quick release when the router bit, spinning at 20kRPM, comes out of the collet. Crapsman tools are exciting!
Note: Please don't confuse this with the AHRA, or American Hot Rod Association, a group with a valid function in this world.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Indeed! The circular saw, scroll saw, router, and belt sander that I bought 30 years ago have never been any trouble and are still in use.
There is still an urge to buy Craftsman, based upon many years of good experience (in college, I went to Sears and bought Whitworth wrenches off the shelf!). Occasionally I lapse and buy there, only to regret it.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in news:BFp%i.3344$ snipped-for-privacy@nlpi068.nbdc.sbc.com:
This is an industrial environment with mulitiple users.
Reply to
Anthony
Unfortunately Sears is a retailer. Customer Service and the local store probably do not have any keyless chucks so to get another keyless chuck they would have to get one from MSC or Mc Master- Carr. So the very best you can expect is that they either replace the drill with another one that has the same design problem or that they refund your money.
If the returns are high enough, they will eventually quit selling that model.
Your best bet is to replace the chuck with one that uses a key.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Dan: It is obvious that Sears bought this drill from some supplier and put their logo on it. If I was Sears, I would get back to the supplier and get them to provide a working chuck. I like the keyless chucks. I have several that function properly and have for some time. The heavily used chuck on my Makita still functions properly. I even have a HF drill that has a keyless chuck that performs much better than the Sears unit. It is possible to manufacture a keyless chuck that functions properly. I haven't had any problems with my Albrecht chucks on my other tools. If I bought a Ford that had a faulty alternator, I would expect Ford to replace the alternator. Sears should recall all those drills and fix the problem. No they choose instead to play the "Its not my job, you have to call..______"
Reply to
Stuart & Kathryn Fields
Sears used to offer around three steps of quality/price in their power tools (20+ years ago?). The higher end stuff was identical to Black & Decker Industrial and I suspect that was who made them for Sears at the time. Sears had some good power tools, but you had to do your homework first and then watch for a good sale price. The good stuff wasn't inexpensive.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
I also have a belt/disc sander and a horizontal band saw of the older Crafstsman pursasion that have held up with minimal problems in excess of thirty years. But the "Auto Loosen" of the keyless chuch on their "Professional" grade driver drill is frustrating. I wonder if this is just an omen of the further down hill slide of Sears quality.
Reply to
Stuart & Kathryn Fields

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.