see four-point sockets



Oh, hell. I guess I had better get prepared for that!
Where at (the bolt) and what year?
--
Jim in NC



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older Dodge Caravan (grand?) , but the round body style Late 90's I think 2.4 4cly, it held the upper motor mount together (pointing the same direction the cam did) Didn't actually have to remove it; and according to another tech it's a Chrysler special tool. I wouldn't buy a set yet!
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Stephen W. Hansen
ASE Certified Master Automobile Technician
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Oh, the BF Vise grip tool, or the BFH and cold chisel? Sounds like what I would end up using! <g>
Of course, then there is the fire ax or the sawz-all!
--
Jim in NC



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Morgans wrote:

BF oxy acetylene, LF dremel :)
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What're BF, BFH and LF?
The Monk
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Flyingmonk wrote:

Well B is big, F is not for polite conversation, H is hammer, L is little. Hope this (F) helps :)
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It sure (F) cleared things up for me :^)
The Monk
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wrote:

Probably needed a Torx socket. These are becoming more common slowly. I know that Briggs and Techumseh are using them on carb bolts now.
Wayne Cook Shamrock, TX http://members.dslextreme.com/users/waynecook/index.htm
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wrote:

Fire hydrant ?
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Leatherman Multitools
My wave has a 5 point security bit
Andy Dingley wrote:

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On Wed, 04 Jan 2006 11:46:06 -0500, Brent Philion

5-point bolt heads (and other strange and wonderful fastener designs) are often found holding things closed that they don't want the average induhvidual off the street to get into, the Leatherman Tools are one good example They'll fix it for you for free if you send it back for service, so you don't need the special 5-point Tamper Torx driver. Controls unauthorized mods that could cause injuries.
Or things that aren't supposed to come apart at that point, like those motor mounts. Sounds like that's for the 'backup bolt' on the mount, meant to keep the engine from falling totally out of the car if the rubber mount fails - and there's always some fool who will remove the bolt "To save weight" and then act surprised when the engine falls on the freeway at speed...
(And then they'll sue the manufacturer of the 'defective' motor mount - and win. Look up "Chutzpah" in the dictionary.)
Things like the lids of Power Utility manholes and handholes, where there are seriously hazardous voltages lurking inside... Which is the reason I need to get a few of those 5-point sockets, so when I get called out on an outage I can confirm whether or not it's dead in there. And secure the lid properly if someone else didn't.
It's one of those "Kids, Don't Try This At Home!" things.
Occasionally (two small associations we service) they tap HOA owned streetlight poles straight from the Edison handhole with a simple inline fuseholder and pay a flat-rate for the power - which is cheaper than installing a meter pedestal and paying the monthly minimum for a meter. And I very occasionally need to get in there and pull the fuse so I can work on the pole without the <ahem> excitement factor.
I do my darnedest to make sparks only when I'm welding. On purpose type welding. With a MIG torch in my hand. Oh heck, you get it... ;-P
--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
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That Makes sense.
Steve

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the other thing about specialist tools is a bit of a liability issue
you CAN work around them but unless you know where and how to find the right tool to tear apart something that shouldnt be tampered with odds are you shouldnt be tampering with it
you CAN rig up a manhole Lidlifter for example but there is a reason manholes are not easy to lift
12 feet underground in a flooded area that just been pumped with high voltage is not a friendly place for untrained people and thats just a telecom manhole let alone a sewer or hydro one.
Stephen H wrote:

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On Fri, 06 Jan 2006 02:16:09 -0500, Brent Philion

Yeah - cause they're also really hard on your toes if you drop them. It's like a Rigger, you have to keep your feet out of the "No Zone". And steel-toes don't help at all if it's your ankle in the way.

Actually, voltage concerns are not a big problem with telecom manholes - everything down there is Class 2 Current Limited. Some of the carrier circuits have 300V or more on them, but most is -48V DC.
Bad air from oxygen depletion or hydrogen sulphide and explosive vapors are a much more imminent hazard, and all you need to do to get killed by them is climb inside without testing and ventilating the space first. I was a construction splicer for 8 years.
Everything involved with telephones is bonded and grounded 47 ways from Sunday. The only holes we had to worry about power were ones located directly under the path of a high-tension transmission line, and they simply wanted us to keep the bonding straps connected at each cable end at all times, and hook up temporary grounds to the racking (instead of leaving them open for the day) and setup our work positions sitting on a rubber blanket with HV Lineman Gloves at the ready "just in case" we had to bail out in an emergency.
--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
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Yep, there is a reason you need a permit to climb down into such places. There are dangers that can kill, if you do not have the proper training.
--
Jim in NC



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You weren't trying to loosen the hood ornament were you? ;-)

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On 3 Jan 2006 11:39:10 -0800, dances_with snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Who on an aviation group uses "FARMER BOLTS" <:-)) I've never see a 4-pt socket, but open end wrences work well. Usually the bolt is of such quality you can plan on twisting it off rather then getting the nut off.
Good luck,
Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member) (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair) www.rogerhalstead.com
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They use those on tractor biplanes....
Jim
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Roger wrote:

I don't know about more modern cars, but on my old Studebakers there's quite a few pipe plugs that have square heads.
nate
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    If you check the headers, you will see that this is cross-posted to rec.crafts.metalworking and rec.autos.tech as well as your newsgroup.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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