Solar power



Would have to analyze the tracker. We get a lot of dirt blowing that would raise hell with gear drives. There is obviously a trade off between increased production and increased system cost. The tracker will cost more in maintenance??? Right now we have no moving parts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since I haven't signed any kind of non-disclosure, here is the web site URL for my PV tracking customer:
http://www.pvtrackers.com /
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Since I haven't signed any kind of non-disclosure, here is the web site URL for my PV tracking customer:
http://www.pvtrackers.com /
Paul
Paul: Thanks for the link. The photos don't look like a very sturdy installation. I'm going to ask them about wind loading. We have seen 80mph winds here in the desert and 50mph gusts aren't unusual. It does look like we could get more from less # panels. However, we would lose our car port..tee hee. I'll ask them about the cost of one of their 20 panel trackers. Thanks again for the link
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What sort of drive mechanism should a DIYer look for that has proven to last?
The only similar experience I have is with a 1950's antenna rotator, which is weatherproof, reliable and easy to maintain but not very powerful.
I have several hand-powered rope and pulley systems around the house that have held up well to the weather. Some use home-made imitations of (expensive) marine hardware, mainly in brass and stainless with polyester rope or steel cable. The rope stretches enough to absorb the shock of falling branches well. Only ice storms jam them, and only until the sun comes back out.
The most exposed ones are the clotheslines which extend back 50 feet under tall trees. Cheap clothesline rope and pulleys last for many years despite ice storms and branches.
jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think tracking mechanisms can be as complicated as one cares to go. A TEFC AC or DC gearmotor or a C-band satellite dish "jack" linear actuator could be sources of power.
When I was looking at various solar devices online years ago (just out of curiosity) there were fairly simple motorized trackers, and others controlled by software on a PC or a home-built circuit, and these were just DIY setups.
I think there is a lot of gear available for amateur astronomer telescopes which could possibly be used as a building block for a tracking system.
--
WB
.........


"Jim Wilkins" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And your marketing research seems to be a thumbs sideways, my salesman will be banging on your door any second, just kidding. Sand has been in the design factor all along, no problem. The tracker cost way less per watt than what the panels cost per watt to add more statically. Not sure about maintenance for sure yet, maybe grease it once a year. That and wash the guidance system while cleaning what ever is on the platform. Thanks for the input.
SW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A losing deal anyway I figure it around here. PPL just raised their rates 45% and it's still cheaper to buy it than to make it.
A school district here just spent $2.4 million on solar power, with a 900K grant from the state of PA. That leaves them 1.5M out of pocket, they say they will make/save 85,000 bucks a year. That gives them a break even at 17.6 years IF nothing ever needs repair or maintanance on the whole system. Morons.
I can't find that article, but here's an even better one......on a planned system.
from www.mcall.com
http://www.mcall.com/opinion/mc-letter-oberle-nazareth-school-dist20100629,0,5514410.story

The questionable or downright stupid use of tax dollars by area school districts continues unabated during a period of stretched budgets and increasing tax rates. The latest is the possible installation of solar panels by the Nazareth Area School District.
The district proposes spending approximately $5.1 million, including, according to a Morning Call report, approximately $3.2 million of local taxpayer dollars, to build two solar plants projected to have a 27-year break-even period. This does not account for maintenance and repair costs. Given that solar panels lose generating capacity over time, it is highly likely that there really is no payback at all. If there is an educational benefit to this project in line with the mission of the school district, it is hard to understand.
This represents an exorbitant waste of taxpayer money on the state and local levels. If we wish to strive toward energy efficiency, that is fine. Let's not do so by expending resources on such an obvious boondoggle.

Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
over night several times out of the year?? We are thinking about using the excess power to go back to a heat pump and get away from the swamp cooler and the disgusting pads. $ value? Value of better, more enjoyable use of my time?? Also the battery technology is gaining ground to the point we may get off the grid completely. $ value??
Stu
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Even the best batteries have a life span and will need replacement. And as they get older their capacity diminishes.
Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I was designing wind and solar in the early 1980's the lament was, "If only solar would come down from $100/ Watt, things would be possible." That was when in the Northwest, retail power cost 1 cent/ kw-hr.
The problem with wind in the Northwest is that we get 6mph wind all the time, except for 24 hours per year of 50 mph wind. What would be better is 15 mph wind all the time.
The trouble with solar heat was that it is dark, cloudy, and 40 degrees all winter.
The only things that really paid were solar lighting and super insulation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.