Sorta NMR: Motorcycles Anyone?

wrote:


Most of the head issues are urban legands. Ive dumped em at speed, and it just grinds up the valve covers a little bit. Nice thing is..it doesnt trap your foot and leg under the bike while you are sliding. Maint is easy, do it yourself, its basicly half a VW engine, dry clutch, drive shaft. Part can be expensive or cheap, depending on where you look and how much of a ripoff your dealer is. Bakersfield has a rat bike dealer...Johnnys BMW.
If you hit something hard enough to fuck up a jug..you are going to be in far worse shape than the scooter.
I paid $600 for my '78 R90/6. Ive got 187,000 miles on the engine..havent had the heads off yet. Mine has points rather than electronic ignition..someday Ill do a conversion.
Gunner
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wrote on Wed, 10 May 2006 09:26:35 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :

    dang, I wish I had written down what George told me. George drove a Moto Guzzi, but told me of a mod then possible with "older" BMWs (this was in 74), which basically involved removing the engine and sticking a stock 1200 VW pancake engine in. Apparently this added power and torque out the wazoo. Draw back was that you kept having to stop and go back and pick up whoever fell off the back.     But you could wind it up on the Interstate and be back before you left. Oh, and the engine provided a nice foot rest (and warmer in the winter).
    Your mileage will vary...
pyotr
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as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
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wrote:

You are mixing two different criteria here Joe..reliable transport and cosmetics. While they may together inhance the "riding experience", they do not necessarily correspond.
I road a stripped down Goldwing for some years. Ugly as hell, but reiliable as an anvil. (and about the same handling). I then went to a Honda VF-700. Fairly reliable..and clean..but made my back hurt on each daily 90 mile ride.
Then I went to a old R90/6 BMW. Totally reliable, needed paint, etc etc..but thats all I needed. Reliability. The simple fairing was a requirement for rain/fog, but I never looked through the badly fogged plastic..but rather over it. I seldom washed it..prefering to use a putty knife every 6 months or so to remove the layer of bugs one picks up when riding 90 miles daily through farms and planted fields, and the layer of coyote one also tends to pick up.
But it was my daily driver for over 5 yrs and frankly..I didnt care what it looked like...Im not into the Biker Lifestyle.
If its dead nuts reliable, and will get you from points A to B..and do so safely..(it IS a motorcycle)...then go for it. All else is icing on the cake. If you want pretty..get a custom Harley. If you want reliable..there are far better choices than Harley. I dont know much about the bike in question so cannot answer to its specific reliablity.
Gunner
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Nah. I'm wondering out loud whether the additional "stuff" that you see as cosmetics might enhance the riding experience during different seasons or protect the vitals that were under the fairing to begin with.

Ahh... The Goldwing must have been something like my current ride - Valkyrie. Except with less power. :) Don't really know what I would do on the VF. I borrowed a Hayabusa for three weeks recently. LOVED the power. Hated the seating position and the constant threat of jail time and large tickets... It was too easy to suddenly find yourself doing 20-30 MPH over the limit.

Most of the time, I would have to totally agree. I ride for the enjoyment and dress for safety whenever possible. However, I also like a reliable machine for the safety too... So I wash it once in a while to see what might be broken, missing, loose, etc.
My Valk is kept sparkling clean - just like I'd keep a Ferrari if I could own one. It's my hobby - my fun - my mistress.

Agreed!
Harley... Not for me. I like to ride, not suffer. :)
...Now all the Harley guys hate me....
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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Joe AutoDrill wrote:

Nah , we don't hate you . Different strokes for different folks , I say . As far as reliability , the new ones are much better than the old days . And comfy too , from what I've heard . I prefer my thirty year old bagger . Yup , I carry tools , but also know my bike intimately , and know what is likely to give me trouble .
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I LOVE the look and sound of a properly maintained and equipped HD.
My buddy has a full dresser and we ride all the time. He and I swapped a few weeks ago and all I can say is that I'd love to have one in my garage for parades, short rides (100 miles or less) or when I go to an event where the model you ride matters... But to ride it like I do - which is sauntering around for 300-500 miles on a weekend, it would kill me.
Plus, I hear his stories about maintenance costs. His last maintenance (10,000 mile) cost more than half the price of my bike and it was routine stuff.

That is a beautiful thing. It's all a matter of preference, right? You do that with your bike... I'll do it with my Opel GT or a 1960 Humber Super Snipe if I can find one again.
I hope this thread doesn't become a bike brand debate... :(
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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I had a Connie for many years. Watch it if it (they) are 86's... they had a tendency to eat their intake valves when ridden hard. My spring retainers were hitting the rocker arms at 32K. Solution was a Paul Gast cylinder head re-work. Stainless valves and some mild porting. My goodness she ran a lot better after that fifteen-hundred dollar infusion. And I hardly ever had to re-set the tappets. They ARE pretty big, heavy bikes though, and you want to take it easy in greasy rain on off-ramps and such. I never crashed mine but I came darn close a few times. The stock Dunlops are great, but the front starts getting weird after 3k of late braking. Good bikes overall, the gas tank is quite big. Final drive never gave probs but grease the splines every other rear tire change. I lost a water pump once. There's a 'junction box' w/relays and such under the sidepanel that can go bad, mine never did. Mine did like to eat speedo cables. Check out the Connie owner's group (COG)-lotsa good compiled info there. I did get caught at work once and rode it home in heavy, melting snow. Made it but was on tiptoes the whole way. If there is ice you will fall down.
Ed Peterson
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Ah, you might have wanted to check the parts book at the Kaw dealer, they were known for putting softer intake valves in bike around that vintage. My KLR (88) was needing those intake valves slacked off nearly weekly until I decided to open it up and see what the *heck* was going on. Good thing I did. I was able to push the valves open with my fingers and drop out the keepers, they had worn so much! The seats btw were just fine.
A trip to the dealer revealed an "updated" part for the intake valves only. NB, my original ex valves never showed the problem. For a hundred bucks I got new springs, valves, seals, and a head gasket.
I've checked them after that, but have yet to have to actually take a wrench to them - nothing's moving now.
Jim
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