source for small cams and followers

I make small kinetic sculptures by buying old electric alarm clocks, electric can openers, and other small motorized kitchen appliances at the
Goodwill, removing the motors, and mounting them into welded boxes with long, bent rods brazed onto the motor shafts. I braze small copper figures like animals, birds, fish, etc. onto the other end of the rods, and plug them in, making sharks that swim in circles, for instance.
I now want to add cams, so these objects move in more complex patterns than just around in circles. Not as complex as automatons, but leading in that direction.
My question is where to source the cams and followers? Either as parts in cheap appliances, or more likely, as stand alone parts ?? I would be happy to fabricate them, but my experiments with 1/8" plexi have not been too successful - any better ideas??
Thanx!
__ "All it took was all I had..."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Emmo wrote:

One thing that comes to mind is to use the same gears, etc. that you are using, and make eccentrics to actuate the actions via pushrod or pull-pull cables in tubes.
Thinking like soldering a pin off axis on the face of a gear. (Does that make any sense?)
Gearing a couple sets of gears together like spirograph can get some pretty complicated motions going too.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Emmo wrote:

Bend up a cam out of 1/8 rod and weld or braze it to the shaft; use a lightweight follower. As long as you actuate _really_ lightweight stuff with it and dress any welds on the working surface carefully it ought to stand up pretty well.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't bother to make the parts yourself. Scavange them from old copiers and laser printers. They're loaded with cams and drive mechanisms.
Emmo wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    Oooooooooo! Me want pictures! :-)
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Whatever happened
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : to Tom Nelson?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to http://www.arthurganson.com/ and buy his DVD. You will see tons of ideas on how to arrange linkages, etc. Most are brazed from wire. Fascinating stuff, and incidentally, a great way to keep visiting nephews rivetted to the couch and out of trouble... --Glenn Lyford
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanx to you and the other respondents. I didn't know there were cams in copiers and laser printers, so that is a good pointer. I don't have any pictures right now, but I will post some soon...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In that event, keep experimenting. JR Dweller in the cellar
Emmo wrote:
I would be happy

--
--------------------------------------------------------------
Home Page: http://www.seanet.com/~jasonrnorth
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Emmo wrote:

Dunno if it'll help ya but ask an appliance repair store for a couple of defective washing machine timers. If you can get enough covers off of one, you will find cams stacked as much as 6 high.
technomaNge
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Emmo: I was just at a very large copier repair facility the other day looking for bearing and rod asssemblies. . They had several large copiers that were slated for the junk pile. Most of the parts are unfortunately, linear in nature. Actuators, slides...that kind of thing. I own several of these large copiers in my business. I have one in fact, that cost me over 40K 7 years ago, is out of service and is in storage because it costs more to move it or dispose of than it is worth. Weird.
Anyway, these types of machines, have motors, rack and pinions, air pumps, air tanks, cylinders, valves...all interesting stuff, but not a lot of cams and followers. Hope that info will save you some time. -Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve: Why not take a short piece of round stock, drill a hole off-center, and braze a rod or shaft into it. I guess this is an eccentric rather than a cam, but the resulting action is the same.
--
Gary Brady
Austin, TX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This makes really good sense, and would be very easy to do - great suggestion !! A huge benefit is that I can easily make them any size that I might need - I have both 1/2" and 5" aluminum rounds that I picked up off the floor at Westbrook Metals. I also think that the followers or tappets would ride easier on rounds than on actual cams, especially if I were to use something like slot car wheels. My mental gears are turning...
Thanx!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Only problem with eccentrics is you have a much longer "activation phase" because the ramps are shallow. A cam gives a good "kick" to activate, then de-activates quickly. An eccentric slowly activates, then slowly de-activates (relative to the action of a cam)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.