Stupidity of design. Rant Warning!

On Mon, 15 May 2017 05:12:03 -0700 (PDT), robobass
The set is likely asian - Jap standard, not Euro.

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wrote:

The problem is that more and more sets of things are poorly designed, and others mimic the first mfgr, so the only thing available is a badly put-together set. Buying extra sockets to fill the set is a given nowadays.
I bought some Chiwanese extension cord ends from a US source recently and was seriously disappointed. The connectors were neither marked nor color coded (unsafe for the normal DIYer), and one of the screws stripped out as I tightened the shell together evenly around the plug. Amazon gave my money back. The last sets were Chiwanese from HF and worked great.
The knockout punch set from HF was taken back immediately. I think someone made the threads with oversized taps and undersized dies, so the fit was close enough to be classified as a sink drain. A 1/4" drive would have stripped it. I checked 1 or 2 more there at the store and they were all made that way, so I chose not to accept a replacement.
I've seen cheap brooms collapse at the first sign of heavy sweeping. The handle was apparently made of 29ga steel.
And on and on...
--



--Robert Knight, senior fellow, American Civil Rights Union

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wrote:

Before putting the Fluke away I measured the voltage drop of 10.0A DC through a 50' 14 AWG HF extension cord I just bought, in case I would be risking a fire by running an air compressor on it.
The spec for 14 AWG is 2.5 ohms per 1000', so 100' should drop 2.5V at 10A. It measured 2.78V which isn't far off and includes the loopback end contact resistances. -jsw
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On Wed, 17 May 2017 20:55:11 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

When I first saw the thing and its quality (or lack thereof) I checked the terminals with a magnet to make sure they weren't dipped steel. Luckly, they weren't.

So it may be 14ga after all? Good.
--



--Robert Knight, senior fellow, American Civil Rights Union

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On Mon, 15 May 2017 04:27:58 -0700 (PDT), robobass

Because there are several different metric "standards" and if you work on Japanese stuff you WILL use the 14, and a 15 would be a total waste.On a Chevy and most weiner wagons, you will never use a 14. Same goes for 11 vs 10, Japs use 10, EVERYWHERE. GM and Wiener wagons use 11. A lot of bikes use 15.
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wrote:

Why? Years ago, perhaps decades, you rescued some old motorcycles from the scrapyard. If you haven't done anything with them by now then you never will.

Elaborating on your scrap pile does nothing to prove you work on motorcycles.

LOL Carry them to where? None of that crap has ever moved because you're too busy online, pretending, instead of working. Any 16 year old with a licensed moped has managed what you cannot.
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wrote:

You meat WHITWORTH. There are quite a few places they are available - Koken (out of Japan) Eurotech, ToolZone,Sealey, lots of others.
I'd buy Kokens if I was in the market - available at Lowbrowcustoms.com, Amazon (They also have Sealey),E-Bay has lots too. They don't usually come cheap though - - -

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On Mon, 15 May 2017 15:49:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When Wieber fantasizes about buying stuff for his yard ornaments, money's no object. Recently he said he'd consider buying some $600 motorcycle jeans. Exactly what he needs for all that iron-butt long-distance hard-charging typing he's not so good at.
BTW, in case any real motorcyclists are reading, I recently added an Airhawk seat pad to my ride. Highly recommended. Wieber could talk about using the same tech on his chair if he wasn't too busy talking about his 2 million miles of scooter riding.
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OK then. I stand corrected. My last Japanese car was an RX-2, which bit the dust in 1981. Since then it has been VW, Saab, or now I am a real sucker f or Alfa Romeo. Still... All tools, machines, bikes, pretty much every hex h ead I have experienced here in Europe, uses 10, 13, 15,17, 19, etc. I own l athes, table saws, milling machines...not to mention bicycles. Never seen a 14mm hex head. But I haven't owned a Toyota!
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On Monday, May 15, 2017 at 12:06:12 PM UTC-4, robobass wrote:

he dust in 1981. Since then it has been VW, Saab, or now I am a real sucker for Alfa Romeo. Still... All tools, machines, bikes, pretty much every hex head I have experienced here in Europe, uses 10, 13, 15,17, 19, etc. I own lathes, table saws, milling machines...not to mention bicycles. Never seen a 14mm hex head. But I haven't owned a Toyota!
I was a real sucker for Alfa Romeo, too. I owned one each '57 and '58 Giull ietta Spiders, one of which I drove through SCCA driver's school. Years lat er, I wrote ad copy for Alfa Romeo when they were headquartered here in NJ.
But they tended to go for the fine-pitch series of metric threads, which we re all but unavailable here at the time. I actually had to order some from Italy in one case.
And then there was the miserable bronze distributor drive gear on my '57 th at gave me ignition-timing hell. <g>
--
Ed Huntress

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On Monday, May 15, 2017 at 6:17:00 PM UTC+2, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

the dust in 1981. Since then it has been VW, Saab, or now I am a real suck er for Alfa Romeo. Still... All tools, machines, bikes, pretty much every h ex head I have experienced here in Europe, uses 10, 13, 15,17, 19, etc. I o wn lathes, table saws, milling machines...not to mention bicycles. Never se en a 14mm hex head. But I haven't owned a Toyota!

llietta Spiders, one of which I drove through SCCA driver's school. Years l ater, I wrote ad copy for Alfa Romeo when they were headquartered here in N J.

were all but unavailable here at the time. I actually had to order some fro m Italy in one case.

that gave me ignition-timing hell. <g>

Ed, Alfas are not so exotic now, I'm sorry to say. They are owned by Fiat, from which you can get your parts, and all screws are Euro standard. The semi-r ecent ones are still real bait for enthusiasts, though. My '02 2 liter has more dents than a trash can, but I pass motorcycles in the Eifel.
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 09:06:08 -0700 (PDT), robobass
I used to dive VW Bugs. I really liked those cars. I would just beat the crap out of them driving fast on dirt roads and had to give up driving them because I abused 'em so much and it got expensive. The Bugs used almost all odd number metric sized fastener hex heads. My tool kits for these cars had 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19mm sized sockets and wrenches. When I started driving japanese cars I had to make sure I had even number metric tools. So I get where you are coming from. Eric
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On Monday, May 15, 2017 at 6:44:50 PM UTC+2, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

the dust in 1981. Since then it has been VW, Saab, or now I am a real sucke r for Alfa Romeo. Still... All tools, machines, bikes, pretty much every he x head I have experienced here in Europe, uses 10, 13, 15,17, 19, etc. I ow n lathes, table saws, milling machines...not to mention bicycles. Never see n a 14mm hex head. But I haven't owned a Toyota!

Eric, yes, I started my VW experience with an '82 Rabbit. Never was there a car more fun to beat the shit out of!
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 09:57:26 -0700 (PDT), robobass

I used to follow my motocrossing friends on the mellower track in my '62 Corvair convertible. It flew nicely with the 100# sandbag in the front. Fond memories.
--



--Robert Knight, senior fellow, American Civil Rights Union

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OK then. I stand corrected. My last Japanese car was an RX-2, which bit the dust in 1981. Since then it has been VW, Saab, or now I am a real sucker for Alfa Romeo. Still... All tools, machines, bikes, pretty much every hex head I have experienced here in Europe, uses 10, 13, 15,17, 19, etc. I own lathes, table saws, milling machines...not to mention bicycles. Never seen a 14mm hex head. But I haven't owned a Toyota!
The old Honda tool kit wrenches in my collection are 8 + 12 and 10 + 14. -jsw
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OK. You guys have got me on the 14mm socket thing. Never saw that coming! B ut now explain this: I have two little kids. In all of the cars I have owned in the last 20 year s except one, there were seat belts for three passengers in the back. The r eceiver for the center seat belt and a side one were adjacent and visually nearly indistinguishable, but not interchangeable. The inconvenience of ha ving to get the belt around a child seat and blindly find the seat belt rec eiver is in itself a chore. Getting it wrong on the first try and having to fish for the other one is just punishment. There is absolutely no reason f or a bias. The receivers mount right next to each other, and can easily be overlapped during use. Explain this one to me.
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On Monday, May 15, 2017 at 12:55:10 PM UTC-4, robobass wrote:

But now explain this:

ars except one, there were seat belts for three passengers in the back. The receiver for the center seat belt and a side one were adjacent and visuall y nearly indistinguishable, but not interchangeable. The inconvenience of having to get the belt around a child seat and blindly find the seat belt r eceiver is in itself a chore. Getting it wrong on the first try and having to fish for the other one is just punishment. There is absolutely no reason for a bias. The receivers mount right next to each other, and can easily b e overlapped during use. Explain this one to me.
I've had the same issue. Finally, I wrapped a piece of masking tape around the one that was for the middle-seat belt. Frustration solved.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Mon, 15 May 2017 09:55:07 -0700 (PDT), robobass

OIverlapping the belts can affect their strength. The center belt HAS to connect to the proper attachment to meat the engineering specs. The only way to assure that happens is to "bastasrdize" the one connector
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 09:55:07 -0700 (PDT), robobass

If you look at it logically, the 2 sides are opposite, so the middle one will be at odds with one or the other, so it doesn't matter which way it goes, belt or receiver. So, they made the middle one a different size, one side getting two receivers. It was probably a legal decision so the button was on the correct side for the passenger, facing away from them, and preventing overlap which would lead to one undoing the other's belt inadvertently.
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--Robert Knight, senior fellow, American Civil Rights Union

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robobass wrote:

Boy, LOTS of stuff on my Honda and Toyota cars are 14mm. Oil drain plugs come to mind, but a lot of the mid-sized body fasteners are also 14mm.
Jon
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