Support situation of old South Bend Lathes

On 9/27/2013 1:03 PM, Gunner Asch wrote:


Yet mil is also correct:
<http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mil
David
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Sorry, I thought the term was common. 1 mil is .001", as in one in a thousand.

Found that one, but it's a 10L, not a 10k. The suction scheme might be required anyway. I was hoping for more detail.
Thanks for reading,
bob prohaska
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wrote:

Not in metalworking.

They work the same way. Simply suck it out, flush with kero..and refill
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Gunner Asch wrote:

It is used around these parts (these parts being Oregon). Heck, they use it at the hardware store to describe the plastic sheeting as well.
Maybe it's a regional thing.
Jon
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    [ ... ]

    Depends on the field. In the electronics field, in particular in things like the lead spacing on ICs (e.g. your plain old 74LS00 quad nand gate IC -- 14 pin DIP) the spacing is given in "mils" which are thousandths of an inch. (Think "Mili-inch". :-) Look on the data sheest for these old ICs. I don't know *what* the lead spacing on those postage-stamp chips where all the leads are bent down and soldered flat to the circuit board. They might be still spec'd in mils, or may be in mm by now. The DIPs like above had the pins on "100 mil centers", and in two rows "300 mils apart". (Or was it "400 mils"? -- I should check sometime soon to refresh my memory.)
    And you *know* that the EEs and such *never* talk to the machinists in the company. (Or if they talk, they don't listen. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Mili-inch is probably it. I picked up the term from my father, who worked in the rubber industry starting in about 1940. It seemed very` common both in academic circles and in the aerospace industry through the early 1980's. The academics preferred to use microns (.001 mm) but everybody used mils when talking about machinery.
Apologies for the confusion,
bob prohaska
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This is an Army copy of the 9" SB manual: http://www.lathetalk.com/library/tm-9-3416-235-14&P_DeptofArmyLatheManual.pdf
The manual for my Heavy 10 gives more about testing and maintenance. I don't know how much of it applies to yours. http://neme-s.org/Shaper%20Books/South%20Bend/CE3458%20Parts%20Manual.pdf
jsw
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Thank you, that promises to be a useful document!
bob prohaska

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wrote:

The extra material in the 10L book shows you what questions to research on the Model A, to the extent that they apply. You don't have the spindle bearing shim adjustment. Here's some discussion on pulling the spindle to get at the bearing surfaces: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/9-southbend-headstock-bearing-gone-south-128883/
jsw
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The photos in the link no longer work, but the discussion is useful. It looks like there's something in the slot below the spindle pinch bolts on my 10k, if it's not a shim then I'm puzzled.
For the moment I'm in "look but don't touch" mode. The spindle feels fine and I'm trying to figure out what the dominant errors in the lathe are. The saddle bed is worn about .020", the tailstock center is visibly below the axis of the spindle, maybe .020". It would be interesting to know the skew between headstock and tailstock axes, but it's not obvious to me how to measure it.
Seems like the first step is make a few parts; if they're good enough it may be wisest to just oil the machine and use it.
Thanks to all for reading and your advice!
bob prohaska
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On 9/26/2013 12:04 AM, User Bp wrote:

SOME Craftsman lathes were built by Atlas. Some of the Craftsman 618 lathes were built by AA and are a much lighter built machine than the Atlas 618.
David
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wrote:

Some..not all.

My 13x42 Clausing and my 15x52 Clausing and my Hardinge HLV-H are hobby machines. Value is about $17,000. My cost was under $3k for all.
One of the hobby uses they are in my shop...putting rifle barrels on actions. And building rifle actions from bar stock. And building off road Stuff for friends various off road rolling stock.

Good luck!
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    [ ... ]

    That depends. The larger ones are, but the 6" ones can be either an Atlas, or the 109 series is by AA machines, and is a very substandard machine, with (among other problems) a spindle which is too small in diameter, and the first crash is likely to produce a bent spindle.
    My Atlas/Craftsman is an older style, with bronze bearings instead of the roller bearings of the later ones. And I have better machines now, so it is retired. :-) I did not like the square bed ways. (One of the things which AA did better -- prismatic ways at least, even with too wimpy a spindle diameter. :-)
    And I think that the Wards may sometimes have been Logan lathes instead of South Bends. (May vary with when.)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The tooling that matters is a 4-jaw chuck and a toolpost. After much searching for a good used chuck, which I couldn't check without running it, I bought a new Bison semisteel 4-jaw. 20 years of light hobby work hasn't loosened it at all.
jsw
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