Tires for Rockwell 20" bandsaw

Our Rockwell 20" bandsaw has rubber "tires" on each wheel. The wheels
are cast aluminum with a central V shaped groove. The tires have
hardened over the years and are now just fragments.
Does anyone know of a source for such parts?
Is it dangerous to run the saw without them?
Thanks.
-DU-...etc...
Reply to
David Utidjian
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The best solution I have found is strips of silicone rubber contact cemented onto the wheels.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I had my Walker Turner bandsaw wheels re-tired at Woodworker's Tool Works in Wisconsin. Their number used to be 800-475-9991. They did a real good job for me back in 1997.
GWE
Tom Gardner wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
There are dozens of sources for new tires. Carter Products, Iturra Design and Delta (Rockwell) are just a few.
Running without tires probably wouldn't hurt the blades, but you'd sure tear up the wheels. Also, wheels that take tires are designed to have the tires crowned - which is what keeps the blade from running off.
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin
Can't speak to the safety issue but Suffolk Machinery lists 20" tires here:
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I have no personal experience with their tires but from what I understand they're good quality and Suffolk is also good about custom jobs if their off-the-shelf stuff isnt suitable.
Contact Info: Suffolk Machinery, Corp. 12 Waverly Avenue Patchogue, NY 11772-1902
Phone: (800) 234-7297 Local: (631) 289-7153 Fax: (631) 289-7156
E-Mail: snipped-for-privacy@SuffolkMachinery.com
Reply to
LP
LP,
Thanks. I will call them on Monday.
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Reply to
David Utidjian
That was just it. I looked at about a half dozen of the first hits I got with a google search and could not find exactly what I wanted. This a rather old Rockwell and I didn't find Delta's site to be very helpful.
Yeah the wheels are already showing wear. The saw is offline for now. It also needs a new blade of which I have several in stock.
Looking at the profile of the old tires it does appear that it was crowned.
I have never welded a bandsaw blade before (I have the manual). Would you recommend welding or silver brazing?
Thanks.
-DU-...etc...
Reply to
David Utidjian
There are three instances in which you'll want to join a bandsaw blade: 1. when making up a new blade from roll stock 2. when repairing a broken blade 3. when cutting and joining a blade to cut an inside shape
For #1, get your blades welded to length by the manufacturer or distributor. They will do a much better job than you will.
For #2, this doesn't happen all that often. Usually, by the time a blade breaks it's pretty well worn. But you can repair by either welding or silver soldering/brazing. Welding is probably stronger, and doesn't require overlap scarfing, but it is usually done with specialized bandsaw welding equipment - not your basic home welding setup. For occasional breaks, I'd save up a few blades and then have them re-welded at a bandsaw shop.
#3 is the real reason to want this capability yourself. If this is something you don't need, skip it. Most users don't need it. If you do, though, you should consider a dedicated blade welder for heavy use, and silver soldering/brazing only for occasional use.
John Martin
Reply to
John Martin

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