Tool storage hanger ideas sought

I've been running out of room for my tools and needing a way to pack a
lot of tools into a small space and have them still easily at hand. I've
been building a tool storage rack the past few days that consists of a 2x4
frame holding up a few 7/16 strandboard panels attached to heavy duty drawer
slides. Slide the panel out and there's a "wall" full of tools, and you can
use both sides if your layout allows. My panels are about 50" x 24" each
and so far are holding more than I expected, but I've run into an issue when
it comes to holding my selection of pliers and similar shaped items.
I purchased some of the magnetic tool strips from HF, which were a major
disappointment for anything but my putty knives. I did some poking around
on the web in search of ideas, and came across a fellow who uses chest
handles mounted upside down to hold his pliers. These are the handles that
flop down out of the way but lift up 90 degrees when you need to lift the
chest. However, they aren't cheap, and continuing on with that thinking I
looked at a bunch of cheap plastic drawer handles, which so far seem to be
about the right size to do the job, but they don't look so incredibly sturdy
to handle long term abuse. I'm not willing to spend more than a dollar to
hang each tool, and believe me there's plenty of ways to store your tools
out there that are expensive! I was willing to settle for plain steel
handles, but I need to find a source that's a bit cheaper than Home Depot,
and the ones they sold were a bit too wide inside.
So I'm on a quest for simple and inexpensive solutions to store pliers
(and my ratchets if you have a good one!) on a wall that doesn't take up
much horizontal space. I'll use nails if I have to, but the wood is a bit
thin (in retrospect, maybe thicker plywood would have been better!) and I'd
like something that will hold many different sizes and kinds without having
them fall off if I bump the rack into something rolling it around.
Reply to
carl mciver
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For your pliers, check out some of the pegboard hangers - they make them for this purpose. (I have a few in use...)
While most are for the small perf size, I *think* I've seen them for 1/4".
Either type can be used with a solid board by simply drilling a couple of parallel holes.
Reply to
RAM^3
| For your pliers, check out some of the pegboard hangers - they make them for | this purpose. (I have a few in use...) | | While most are for the small perf size, I *think* I've seen them for 1/4". | | Either type can be used with a solid board by simply drilling a couple of | parallel holes.
I had even pondered a piece of pegboard mounted on top of the panel, but there are two issues. One, pegboard and the hangers for it suck. If you want the clips to stay put, you have to spend even more money on more expensive ones. This rack is a mobile one and as it is I need to install a solid "floor" on it to stop the tools from going all the way through! Secondly, the hangars for pliers don't have a positive way to keep them from coming off if the rack gets bumped, which so far is becoming an issue for my small wrenches.
Reply to
carl mciver
I saw an old Popular Mechanics design which was basically a cube. Inside the bottom of the upper surface of the cube ran a bunch of parallel tracks, on which hung squares of pegboard. So viewed one way, you'd see the ends of a bunch of pegboard squares, each slightly smaller than the cube dimension. You could slide each out on its track, with the nearer track mount coming loose and the rear track mount staying in. The pegboard square would be slid nearly all the way out and then slid sideways, where the other track mount would again bear. Each pegboard was separated by a couple of inches or so, and each had lots of tools mounted on it.
Tough to describe in words, it's probably in one of my old Shop Notes. I might see it again someday, but I can't dig it out now. Lots of tool storage in a small space, though.
Me, I use rollaways and 3x6x18" drawers, lots of 'em, labeled.
GWE
carl mciver wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Plastic tubing (drop one handle down into the tubing) or garden hose, etc., etc. Ken.
Reply to
Ken Sterling
PVC pipe, various sizes, cheap, easy to cut, drill, can be heated and flattened a little like for the pliers. Dril through both sides and enlarge one to drive screw into inside hole. Dale
Reply to
drandall
Rare earth magnets.
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Amazingly strong. Strong enough to raise blood blisters. Get a cup for each, for easy single-screw mounting and to increase the strength.
- - Rex Burkheimer WM Automotive Fort Worth TX
carl mciver wrote:
Reply to
Rex B
Tool hangers? Try our new, improved ToolyRoo(tm) and Possum(tm) handy pouches!
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Those are actually rather cool. Only problem I can see is sawdust gumming up the velcro. Snaps may be a better way to go. Or YKK zipper.
Gunner
"This device is provided without warranty of any kind as to reliability, accuracy, existence or otherwise or fitness for any particular purpose and Bioalchemic Products specifically does not warrant, guarantee, imply or make any representations as to its merchantability for any particular purpose and furthermore shall have no liability for or responsibility to you or any other person, entity or deity with respect to any loss or damage whatsoever caused by this device or object or by any attempts to destroy it by hammering it against a wall or dropping it into a deep well or any other means whatsoever and moreover asserts that you indicate your acceptance of this agreement or any other agreement that may he substituted at any time by coming within five miles of the product or observing it through large telescopes or by any other means because you are such an easily cowed moron who will happily accept arrogant and unilateral conditions on a piece of highly priced garbage that you would not dream of accepting on a bag of dog biscuits and is used solely at your own risk.'
Reply to
Gunner
Not a problem.
A brushing and/or quick blast of compressed air frees all dust (to go gum up something else.) File cards and shop vacs work pretty well, too.
Zippers have a much worse time in a dirty environment. BTDT.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
OK - so why not simply use a screw eye to balance the pliers on [or hook a box-end wrench on] and staple a strip of Velcro to lock them in place?
If you're doing a number of tools in a row, all you'd really need would be a good staple gun.
Other "loose" tools can fit in pouches formed from canvas/webbing/plastic stapled to the backing board.
Reply to
RAM^3
Go to a thrift store and look for pants and vests with tons of extraneous pockets. Buy them, cut out the pockets, staple the pockets to the boards, insert tools.
Reply to
B.B.
I wear an Uncle Mikes ankle holster with an handgun tucked away in it. It depends on velcro to stay attached to my leg..and when Im working in sawdust, or similar type of environment...its a stone bitch to get all the spooge out of the velco so it will attach the next day
Ive tried all those methods, none work well for me. Shrug
The big YKK nylon ones? Those seem to last forever for me with few issues, unless you pull hard on them or snag em.
Gunner
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
Reply to
Gunner
So put on a tyvek/cotton/nylon jump suit to keep the spooge offen yer ankles/holster. You're talking about kneeling/sitting/laying/rolling around in sawdust under large machine beds, right? BTDT, but without a piece.
Perhaps I make finer sawdust than you do. ;)
The big YKK nylon jobs are better, but how often do you find them, especially on smaller items like that ankle holster?
P.S: I'm almost glad I didn't have a chance to stop by your place last week. It was 105° in Concord and DOWN to 102°F in Redding when I was heading north for home last Sunday. An extra couple days of driving in that kind of heat (old truck/no A/C) would have killed me.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Try it daily with. Cant wear a jump suit...way too hot most of the time for two layers of clothes. Shrug.
Perhaps. Im going to have to buy another identical holster soon, as this one is just about worn out.
Hint..you make Stuff..right?
But...its a dry heat. , up there in Redding etc..the humitiy is a lot higher. True.
Yall come on down when the weather cools off and you girly men dont melt. Let you play in the shop, maybe get some range time with assorted toys.
Chuckle
Gunner
Liberals - Cosmopolitan critics, men who are the friends of every country save their own. Benjamin Disraeli
Reply to
Gunner
Yup, but I'm not cheap. ;) Whatcha need?
Yeah, I didn't realize it was a swampy area until I stopped to see the Sundial Bridge a year and a half ago.
Get a Barrett 50 toy, OK? I really want to play with one. Wait until I save up some ducats, then find a cheap knuckle boom truck to buy to bring back all my goodies on, eh?
That's the ticket!
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
Try the jumpsuit without the other clothes underneath. Feels strange at first but you get used to it and much cooler.
Reply to
Nick Hull
Neat idea. How about getting some cheap steel hinges and welding or brazing wire loops to them that fit the various tools. 69 cents each.
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Reply to
Don Foreman

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