What is it? CXXV

A new set of photos has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com/
Rob

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R.H. wrote:

726 The predecessor to the dial indicator.
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727. Coffee griinder? 728. Maybe an old "hot stick" for working on distribution lines before the introduction of fiberglass poles?
todd
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I think 730 is a variant on the "Ames window" optical illusion.
LLoyd
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R.H. wrote:

726
727- spice grinder?
728- gaff for opening/closing windows, or something made to threead rope/chain from the floor.
729
730
731- scrapes paint off glass, goes around the window frame
Dave
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R.H. wrote:

728 - Suppose it's 1930 and I want take electricity 100 yards from a house to a barn. A device like this could be used to pick up both wires, keep one several inches above the other so they don't end up crossed, and provide temporary support by hooking over something. This could simplify the job and reduce the number of trips up a ladder.
729 - Looks like it could be used to check the gap of a spark plug and bend the side electrode. A similar tool could be used on some ignition points.
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727 is a cigarette rolling machine I do believe.
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My father worked for the Bell System and had a commercial one of these. This one looks home made. It's used for manipulating overhead wires/cables/ropes without the need for a ladder or climbing up a telephone pole. In addition to the stated defects this one also has a misshapen hook.
Art

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Oops. Previous refers to #728.

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Where and when did your dad work for Bell?
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Phoenix. Late 50's 'till about '80.
Art

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Cool. I worked for them in Louisville from the early 80's till 2000
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@cinci.rr.com says...

727 - (wool?) carding machine.
Ned Simmons
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    As usual, posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
726)    This one is a combination of two tools:
    A runout indicator (most have dials, but this one is just a     pointer moved by the lever, and calibrated to tell how far the     ball tip is moving. The needle will move upscale for either     direction of motion. I have one example of this sort of     indicator. This one moves full scale for a motion of 0.010"     (assuming that the ball tip is at the right angle to the tested     surface -- at other angles, it will introduce cosine error, so     the reading will not be accurate.
    And a wiggler gauge, with the sharp point it is used to show how     far off center a center-punch mark is, to allow it to be     adjusted on center. The area where the small diameter shank     joins the larger one has a ball at the end of the small     diameter, fitted into a cavity at the large diameter shank, with     a knurled cap to tighten it just enough so the point can be     easily moved, but not too tight.
    To use (one possible way) chuck the larger shank in the     tailstock chuck in the lathe. Advance the point until it enters     the center punch mark, and then adjust the runout indicator to     touch the small diameter just behind the point.
    Then (assuming a 4-jaw independent chuck), rotate the chuck     slowly, by hand, and note the maximum and minimum reading of the     indicator, and loosen the chuck jaw near the lowest reading, and     tighten that near the highest reading. Repeat a few times to     get the mark as close to center as possible. (There are other     ways to do this, but this is one way that this would be used.)
    It can also be used to center a milling machine spindle (or ever     a drill press spindle) over a center punch mark for locating the     hole to be drilled or milled.
    I must admit to never having seen the two joined like this, but     it is a good tool.
727)    This looks like a small version of a cotton gin, or perhaps a     machine for carding wool.
    If a cotton gin, the seeds would collect in the drawer below the     surface.
    An indication of size would be nice to have, but assuming that     the crank handle is designed for a single hand, I would guess     that the flat surface is about 5 to 6 inches across, and the     drum is about that diameter (exclusive of the points).
728)    At a guess -- it is a tool for shifting belts (flat leather     ones) for machines which were driven by an overhead lineshaft,     as was common in earlier days before almost all machine tools     got their own electric motors. The lineshaft could have been     driven by a steam engine, perhaps by horses or oxen, or by a     large electric motor.
729)    Tool for adjusting something by bending it, and verifying the     adjustment by using the pivoted tab as a feeler gauge, I think.
730)    Hmm ... it looks as though it is designed to be looked at from     a specific angle and distance, and it will appear square. So     some sort of perspective demonstrator.
731)    It looks like a tool designed to run along taut cables and to     allow that to guide the corner scraper mounted on the near end.
    One possible use might be to run it along the inside of window     frames to square up the step into which the glass is fitted     before it gets puttyed in place.
    Now -- to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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Thanks for the info on this tool, I knew what it was called, but not how it was used.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

The long pole is with hooks is used for stinging lines or cable I built one myself for stringing up christmas tree lights on a large tree outside of our house. It is also good for tinsel popcorn strings and in the summer time string lights in the backyard
PJ
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R.H. wrote:

I believe the wood box with the gears is a bread crumb grinder or a nut grinder
PJ
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All six have been answered correctly this week:
726. Mechanical indicator
727. Wool carder, this item only has the one large drum, most of these have a second smaller drum on the same shaft as the handle, so the owner wasn't sure if was actually a drum wool carder or not. I'm going with this answer until I see evidence otherwise.
728. Wire stringing tool, thanks to those who answered this one
729. Spark plug gap tool and gauge
730. Image: Ames room floor; Project: making a model Ames room.
731. Window paint scraper
A couple new photos and a few links have been posted on the answer page:
http://pzphotosan127-8.blogspot.com/
Rob
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If you don't mind I'm willing to ask on a fiber related mailing list. Both antique spinning equipment and modern carding drums have been discussed there in the recent past.
--
William

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