What is it? Set 448

Painters need to stay hydrated? Must be.
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Bottle opener is right
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
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Is 2599 (the grinding stones) related, in some way, to 2603 (the large 5' kettle)? Both appear to be at the same museum, ie. the signs on the tree with the number 26, other grinding stones, and the fence construction in some areas.
Whatever is ground, by the stones, is placed into the kettle for cooking/processing? Other guesses: For grinding some wood/fibrous product, to make a resinous paste product or for making a texture product for better chinking of logs of a log cabin, for enhancing mortar for chimney making or for making a more solid (or waterproof?) flooring in cabins?
That museum looks like a nice interesting place to visit.
Reply to
Sonny
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#6 shows a 60-gallon Columbus kettle used to scald hogs. It looks like a match.
#11 shows a 120-gallon used to boil cane juice. Kettles for this purpose appear thicker than the mystery item, probably to prevent hot spots.
Reply to
J Burns
I cheated and found the answer to #2599, the grinding stones. Here is someone's MySpace site with 90 pictures taken at the Museum of Appalachia, in Norris, Tn.
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As for as that large kettle, I still believe its original purpose was for making syrup. It may have had a secondary use for scalding hogs, just as today the kettles, in my area, have a secondary use as lawn decor. You don't need 60 or 120 gallons of hot water to scald a hog, unless it was used at a slaughter house for scalding lots of hogs, hence the quantity of water needed was great, for the many hogs. Additionally, read the sign here:
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Reply to
Sonny
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From that area, the most likely was for a molasses kettle...
I wasn't back for a while; I see the posting from the shots from somebody else from the Applachian Museum identified the crusher.
I wasn't absolutely positive it was the same one--when I was last there it hadn't gotten in such bad shape yet as indicated by the picture on the other link when it was still intact...the current state is sad to see... :(
It's been 15 yr now since we moved back to the farm from the time spent in TN and I suppose probably had been 10 since had done anything except go to the festival weekends and not wandered the grounds much while still there. We were located about 15 mi southwest...
Reply to
dpb
Interesting comment Michael, that was my tool of choice for them too. And I fiddled with them pretty regular. Motorola used them to secure the microphone cords on their Maxar/Moxy model line and I replaced a lot of them... Used to be the smallest version (don't know if that is still true) made by Channel Lock. Worked quite well too :)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
These were about 8" long, and I would set them to one groove longer than parallel so that the Heyco would compress with little or no damage. I've done that on ones that ranged from 1/4" mounting hole, to ones that were over an inch in diameter.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
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This museum had a couple of smaller kettles that were marked as being for scalding hogs, but this larger one was not for making syrup. Still no luck on the clamp but the rest of the answers have been posted:
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Reply to
Rob H.
Yup, that is exactly how I used to do it and why the "groove" style plier worked so well. Now I don't feel quite so clever anymore, must have been an obvious solution ;-)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
As I mentioned, the owner of these items had told me they were targets, they didn't have any noticeable dents in them so I was skeptical but went with that answer for lack of a better one. Someone just sent me an email stating:
"They are actually "frying pan" or "pancake" pipe line blanks, for blanking off product lines in manufacturing processes. I worked with them for 40 odd years. They are installed in the lines between flange fittings to prevent product flow in the lines while doing maintenance or repair."
Sounds reasonable so I went ahead and added this to my answer.
Reply to
Rob H.
Yes, I recall, when working at Placid Refinery, Port Allen, La., those were used as blocks at flange fittings during maintenance operations. I initially thought they looked familiar.
Sonny
Reply to
Sonny
Think I got lucky ;-) Item #2602 seems to be a "Device for filling Pipe Joints".
Patent number: 948686 Date: Feb 8, 1910
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Reply to
Leon Fisk
Great job on finding the patent! I'll send this to the owner, I was guessing it was from the 1920s.
Rob
Reply to
Rob H.

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