What is it? Set CCXXVII

Set number 227 has just been posted:
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Rob
Reply to
R.H.
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hi all,
1270 umph, i dont know the word for. you take a rope, put it throug this little thing. then you pull at one end of the rope, and it can´t slip back, even when something is drawing heavily at the other end. "self locking"
1274 hand held microscope or tiny telescope?
the others, hmm, no idea
greetings from germany chris
Reply to
Christian Stüben
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I've got a couple of related ones. They have the HV friction charger built-in. One holds a charge nicely, the other leaks down fairly quickly.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Friction Charger? Ive never seen one of those
Gunner
Reply to
Gunner
I have seen the piezo charger but never seen one with a buit-in charger. Could you post a pix of your unit don ? I would really like to see what one looks like.
If anyones intrested heres a link to what the hand held piezo charger looks like, it the one with the handle you squeeze.
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Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
azotic
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It is a cylinder turned by a knob which turns inside a dissimilar material to generate a high voltage static charge (very low current however). It is sort of like rubbing a glass rod with silk to generate high voltage sparks.
How do the separate chargers for the ones shown in the puzzle work?
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
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I would be glad to -- if I could find them. Right now, they are in the metal housing with the serious Navy surplus Geiger Counter (more ranges than the little CD ones, and a separate hand-held probe for the more sensitive ranges. (There is a second, smaller, tube inside the housing just behind a dimple designed to mark its location.)
Anyway -- I'll try my hand at ASCII graphics to show what they are like. Be sure to view with a fixed pitch font (like Courier) to avoid image distortion. +----------+ ++----------------------------------+ | || | | If anyones intrested heres a link to what the hand held piezo charger looks
I suspect that the one at the lower-left with the pot-metal knob and the one in the bottom middle with the black knob work in a fashion similar to mine. But they are a lot larger. I guess that these were for people who knew enough not to reset the one they were wearing in the middle of an operation. :-)
Speaking of CD -- are there still CD markers on any modern AM radio dials? :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
They wouldn't work for Chernobyl anyway. They're OK for direct radiation, almost no use for alpha-emitting dust, which is what the practical hazard was after Chernobyl (for anyone outside the "You're screwed anyway, Comrade Hero" range).
Reply to
Andy Dingley
The ones i have taken apart and studied consist of a transistor oscillator driving a transformer to generate the high voltage which is then rectified and fed into a filter capacitor. As i recall they required a single D cell to work. The problem with the battery operated units is that most of them came with batteries that eventually leaked. When the units were tested upon reciept the people in charge for the most part left the batteries installed eventually corroding the guts of the charger making them useless in the event they were ever needed.
Best Regards Tom.
Reply to
azotic
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Ouch! They wanted to be "ready". :-)
It is certainly different from mine, as there was no separate battery so the power had to come from physical energy put into the unit. Luckly, it did not take much energy. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Nope - they quit that in the 70's.
We don't have to worry about a swarm of Russkie Bombers coming over the Polar Route "DEW Line" using commercial AM Radio stations for Radio Direction Finding to home in on our big cities and deliver us a "Nookular Present" - they have GPS now, and even dead reckoning can be done much better.
Synopsis: The whole idea behind "CONtrol of ELectronic RADiation" was that ALL broadcast TV and radio stations, aircraft beacons, Ham, Public Service and Business two-way radio would shut down. Total Radio Silence, all bands. No fixed point signals to home in on.
And many of the larger AM radio stations would have hot TX crystal ovens and pre-tested tower tuning points (the red-painted spots on the loading coils and tuning knobs) for quickly switching over to either 640 or 1240 KHz non-directional.
The only radio you would hear would be the regional Civil Defense emergency instructions as the various stations all swapped off transmitting them round-robin every few minutes, not announcing call signs or locations.
RDF doesn't work worth beans if they can turn off every signal you could use, and the few that remain shift location by 25 miles or more in a random pattern every 3 minutes.
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PS: Hold the flames. Yes, I realize that even back then when they treated the Cold War seriously there is no WAY they could get 100% of the transmitters turned off for hours - they'd have to send someone out to the hilltop repeaters and rural translators and physically cut the cords, and search out the saboteurs sending homing signals... But CONELRAD was still a sound idea - /for it's time/.
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman

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